Syfi
Syfi

Syfi

Booped
Booped

Booped

How Much
How Much

How Much

Imposses
Imposses

Imposses

Booping
Booping

Booping

there is
 there is

there is

farms
 farms

farms

sing
 sing

sing

evident
evident

evident

cred
cred

cred

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woodland: jareckiworld: Milan Nápravník  -  Woodland   (oil on canvas, mid-1970s)
woodland: jareckiworld:
Milan Nápravník  -  Woodland   (oil on canvas,
mid-1970s)

jareckiworld: Milan Nápravník  -  Woodland   (oil on canvas, mid-1970s)

woodland: . Outdoor cats face danger from cars, disease, predators and cruel humans Domestic cats DO NOT belong outdoors as they're not a natural part of our ecosystem. They're a genetically modified species & a non-native, invasive predator Cats kill up to 3.7 billion birds 20.7 billion mammals, 800 million lizards and 300 million frogs every year. . Domestic pets like dogs & ferrets & even exotic pets like snakes & lizards do not roam free & hunt outside. Why should cats? A 2011 study indicates that cats have caused the extinction of 33 species of birds, mammals and reptiles kaijutegu: fantasticbeastsandhowtokeepthem: wildlife-rehabilitator: hotcommunist: withgoldenfire: hotcommunist: findchaos: wildlife-rehabilitator: Some of you may have seen my reply to a post and the ask I received about outdoor cats, so here is a little infographic about outdoor cats. Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cast outside. No exceptions. Nope, I don’t care if Muffles is super-special and adventurous. Nope, still don’t care that it’s different where you live. Please refer to the original bullet points.  (*gets ready to hit ‘Block’ on a thousand angry cat owners*) this is a mess have you gobshites genuinely never fucking heard of farm cats jesus wept, if i never see another fucking townie animal rights activist it’ll be too fucking soon. the current political system we live under doesn’t give a fuck about nature. wildlife charities have had a huge downward swoop in donations due to the recession caused by the powers that be, fracking is being done on national parks and nature reserves, roads are hastily built through wildlife rich areas and adequate warning signage is not provided… but no, it’s us ordinary people and our pesky outdoor cats that are the cause of…extinct….species…? really? is this the hill u want to die on OP??? get back 2 me I’m not refuting that humans kill far more animals than cats do, but over a billion animals are killed annually in the US by outdoor cats. That’s also a huge problem. I’m also aware that wildlife rescue organizations are losing donations - I’m the vice president and co-founder of a 501©(3) non-profit organization and not only do we scrape by on small donations while dozens of animals come in a month, many of which are injured by cats. We just had to euthanize a yearling squirrel because it was mauled by a cat and had full hind-end paralysis from the attack. Believe me, I understand. “An estimated 60 to 88 million cats are owned in the US and an estimated 60 million more are feral… While loss of habitat is the primary cause of extinction, cats are responsible for the extinction of 33 species of birds worldwide. Cats kill an estimated 480 million birds per year (assuming eight birds killed per feral cat per year.)” That is a grossly conservative number, and only accounts for feral cats, not outdoor pets. And that’s just birds. Plus the other wildlife that are killed by cats annually. Here’s another resource, a smaller scale research program called Kitty Cams: “Hunting cats captured an average of 2 items during seven days of roaming. Carolina anoles (small lizards) were the most common prey species followed by Woodland Voles (small mammals). Only one of the vertebrates captured was a non-native species (a House Mouse).” From the same group: “44% of cats were witnessed stalking or chasing prey; 30% captured wildlife.” An article from Mental Floss, sources listed at the bottom of the article:  “84 million House cats in the United States 4 to 18 Birds killed by a typical house cat every year 8 to 21 Small mammals killed by a typical house cat every year 30 million to 80 million Free-roaming, feral cats estimated to be living in the United States. They either survive alone or live in colonies. In Washington, D.C., for example, there are estimated to be some 300 outdoor cat colonies. 23 to 46 Birds killed by each feral cat every year 129 to 338 Small mammals killed by each feral cat every year 1.4 billion to 3.7 billion Total birds killed by America’s cats every year 15 Percentage of all bird deaths estimated to come at the hands — er, paws — of cats 6.9 billion to 20.7 billion Total small mammals killed by cats every year” From a report on ABC News: “Cats are responsible for the deaths of 1.4 to 3.7 billion birds and 6.9 to 20.7 billion mammals every year, according to research conducted by the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.” From the American Bird Conservancy: “If we extrapolate the results of this study across the country and include feral cats, we find that cats are likely killing more than 4 billion animals per year, including at least 500 million birds.” (Also you’re putting your cat in unnecessary danger from tons of different threats by letting them outside unsupervised. So even if you don’t wanna give a shit about wildlife, maybe try giving a shit about your cat’s health life.) (Also farm cats are often not treated well, not provided with proper veterinary care, and there are other options for rodent control that doesn’t put other wildlife in as much danger) also consider: this is 100% something that you, as an individual, can do to mitigate some of the natural disaster that is the anthropocene. We’re on track to lose something like 80% of global biodiversity by the end of the century, and there’s almost nothing that your average citizen can do about it. But keeping your cats inside to help preserve local biodiversity and mitigating the damage that ferals do is actually something that you can do. 
woodland: . Outdoor cats face danger
 from cars, disease, predators
 and cruel humans
 Domestic cats DO NOT
 belong outdoors as they're
 not a natural part of our
 ecosystem. They're a
 genetically modified species
 & a non-native, invasive
 predator
 Cats kill up to 3.7 billion birds
 20.7 billion mammals,
 800 million lizards and 300
 million frogs every year.
 . Domestic pets like dogs
 & ferrets & even exotic pets
 like snakes & lizards do not
 roam free & hunt outside.
 Why should cats?
 A 2011 study indicates
 that cats have caused the
 extinction of 33 species of
 birds, mammals and reptiles
kaijutegu:

fantasticbeastsandhowtokeepthem:

wildlife-rehabilitator:

hotcommunist:

withgoldenfire:

hotcommunist:

findchaos:

wildlife-rehabilitator:

Some of you may have seen my reply to a post and the ask I received about outdoor cats, so here is a little infographic about outdoor cats.

Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cast outside.
No exceptions. Nope, I don’t care if Muffles is super-special and adventurous. Nope, still don’t care that it’s different where you live. Please refer to the original bullet points. 
(*gets ready to hit ‘Block’ on a thousand angry cat owners*)

this is a mess

have you gobshites genuinely never fucking heard of farm cats jesus wept, if i never see another fucking townie animal rights activist it’ll be too fucking soon.

the current political system we live under doesn’t give a fuck about nature. wildlife charities have had a huge downward swoop in donations due to the recession caused by the powers that be, fracking is being done on national parks and nature reserves, roads are hastily built through wildlife rich areas and adequate warning signage is not provided…
but no, it’s us ordinary people and our pesky outdoor cats that are the cause of…extinct….species…? really? is this the hill u want to die on OP??? get back 2 me


I’m not refuting that humans kill far more animals than cats do, but over a billion animals are killed annually in the US by outdoor cats. That’s also a huge problem. I’m also aware that wildlife rescue organizations are losing donations - I’m the vice president and co-founder of a 501©(3) non-profit organization and not only do we scrape by on small donations while dozens of animals come in a month, many of which are injured by cats. We just had to euthanize a yearling squirrel because it was mauled by a cat and had full hind-end paralysis from the attack. Believe me, I understand.
“An estimated 60 to 88 million cats are owned in the US and an estimated 60 million more are feral… While loss of habitat is the primary cause of extinction, cats are responsible for the extinction of 33 species of birds worldwide. Cats kill an estimated 480 million birds per year (assuming eight birds killed per feral cat per year.)” That is a grossly conservative number, and only accounts for feral cats, not outdoor pets. And that’s just birds. Plus the other wildlife that are killed by cats annually.
Here’s another resource, a smaller scale research program called Kitty Cams: “Hunting cats captured an average of 2 items during seven days of roaming. Carolina anoles (small lizards) were the most common prey species followed by Woodland Voles (small mammals). Only one of the vertebrates captured was a non-native species (a House Mouse).” From the same group: “44% of cats were
witnessed stalking or
chasing prey; 30% captured
wildlife.”


An article from Mental Floss, sources listed at the bottom of the article: 


“84 million House cats in the United States
4 to 18 Birds killed by a typical house cat every year
8 to 21 Small mammals killed by a typical house cat every year
30 million to 80 million Free-roaming, feral cats estimated to be living in the United States. They either survive alone or live in colonies. In Washington, D.C., for example, there are estimated to be some 300 outdoor cat colonies.
23 to 46 Birds killed by each feral cat every year
129 to 338 Small mammals killed by each feral cat every year
1.4 billion to 3.7 billion Total birds killed by America’s cats every year
15 Percentage of all bird deaths estimated to come at the hands — er, paws — of cats
6.9 billion to 20.7 billion Total small mammals killed by cats every year”
From a report on ABC News: “Cats are responsible for the deaths of 1.4 to 3.7 billion birds and 6.9 to 20.7 billion mammals every year, according to research conducted by the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.”


From the American Bird Conservancy: “If we extrapolate the results of this study across the country and include feral cats, we find that cats are likely killing more than 4 billion animals per year, including at least 500 million birds.” 



(Also you’re putting your cat in unnecessary danger from tons of different threats by letting them outside unsupervised. So even if you don’t wanna give a shit about wildlife, maybe try giving a shit about your cat’s health  life.)
(Also farm cats are often not treated well, not provided with proper veterinary care, and there are other options for rodent control that doesn’t put other wildlife in as much danger)

also consider: this is 100% something that you, as an individual, can do to mitigate some of the natural disaster that is the anthropocene. We’re on track to lose something like 80% of global biodiversity by the end of the century, and there’s almost nothing that your average citizen can do about it. But keeping your cats inside to help preserve local biodiversity and mitigating the damage that ferals do is actually something that you can do. 

kaijutegu: fantasticbeastsandhowtokeepthem: wildlife-rehabilitator: hotcommunist: withgoldenfire: hotcommunist: findchaos: wildlif...

woodland: MAKE AMERICA AN ENDLESS EXPANSE OF OLD-GROWTH FOREST WITH NO CERTAIN BORDERS AGAIN virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t an endless expanse of forest with no certain borders. At least not while human beings inhabited it. The idea that native peoples did not cultivate or shape our land and that we had no borders is white propaganda meant to dehumanize and de-legitimize native peoples. This illustration here show Apalachee people using slash and burn methods for agriculture. Fires were set regularly to intention burn down forests and plains. Why would we do this? Well because an unregulated forest isn’t that great for people, actually. We set fires to destroy new forest growth and undergrowth, and to remove trees, allowing for easier game hunting, nutrient enriched soil, and better growth rates for crops and herbs we used in food and medicine. Pre-Colonial New England, where my tribe the Abenaki are from, looked more like an extensive meadow or savannah with trees growing in pockets and groves. Enough woodland to support birds, deer, and moose, but not too much to make hunting difficult. We carefully shaped the land around us to suit our needs as a thriving and successful people. Slash and burn agriculture was practiced virtually everywhere in the new world, from the pacific coast to chesapeake bay, from panama to quebec. It was a highly successful way of revitalizing the land and promoting crop growth, as well as preventing massive forest fires that thrive in unregulated forests. Berries were the major source of fruit for my tribe, and we needed to burn the undergrowth so they could grow. That changed when white people invaded, and brought with them disease. In my tribe, up to 9 in 10 people died. 90% of our people perished not from violence starvation, but from disease. Entire villages would be decimated, struck down by small pox. Suddenly, we couldn’t care for the land anymore. There weren’t enough of us to maintain a vast, carefully structured ecological system like we had for thousands of years. We didn’t have the numbers, or strength. So the trees grew back and unregulated. We couldn’t set fires anymore, and we couldn’t cultivate the land. And white people would make certain we never could again. Timber, after all, was the most important export from New England.  Endless trees and untamed wilderness is a nice fantasy. But it’s a very white fantasy, one that erases the history of my people and of my land. One that paints native peoples are merely parasites leeching off the land, not masters of the earth who new the right balance of hunting and agriculture. It robs us of our agency as people, and takes our accomplishments from us. Moreover, it implies that only white people ever discovered the power to shape the world around them, and that mere brown people can’t possibly have had anything to do with changing our environment. Don’t bring back untamed wilderness. Bring back my fire setters, my tree sappers, my farmers and my fishers. Bring back my people who were here first.  Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_use_of_fire#Role_of_fire_by_natives https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_000385.pdf http://www.sidalc.net/repdoc/A11604i/A11604i.pdf For those curious I recommend reading Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists and the Ecology of New England.https://books.google.com/books/about/Changes_in_the_Land.html?id=AHclmuykdBQCprintsec=frontcoversource=kp_read_button#v=onepageqf=false
woodland: MAKE AMERICA
 AN ENDLESS
 EXPANSE OF
 OLD-GROWTH
 FOREST WITH
 NO CERTAIN
 BORDERS
 AGAIN
virulentblog:

plaid-flannel:
Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine.
Photo: Bill Roorbach
Except America wasn’t an endless expanse of forest with no certain borders. At least not while human beings inhabited it. The idea that native peoples did not cultivate or shape our land and that we had no borders is white propaganda meant to dehumanize and de-legitimize native peoples.
This illustration here show Apalachee people using slash and burn methods for agriculture. Fires were set regularly to intention burn down forests and plains. Why would we do this? Well because an unregulated forest isn’t that great for people, actually. We set fires to destroy new forest growth and undergrowth, and to remove trees, allowing for easier game hunting, nutrient enriched soil, and better growth rates for crops and herbs we used in food and medicine.
Pre-Colonial New England, where my tribe the Abenaki are from, looked more like an extensive meadow or savannah with trees growing in pockets and groves. Enough woodland to support birds, deer, and moose, but not too much to make hunting difficult. We carefully shaped the land around us to suit our needs as a thriving and successful people. Slash and burn agriculture was practiced virtually everywhere in the new world, from the pacific coast to chesapeake bay, from panama to quebec. It was a highly successful way of revitalizing the land and promoting crop growth, as well as preventing massive forest fires that thrive in unregulated forests. Berries were the major source of fruit for my tribe, and we needed to burn the undergrowth so they could grow.
That changed when white people invaded, and brought with them disease. In my tribe, up to 9 in 10 people died. 90% of our people perished not from violence starvation, but from disease. Entire villages would be decimated, struck down by small pox. Suddenly, we couldn’t care for the land anymore. There weren’t enough of us to maintain a vast, carefully structured ecological system like we had for thousands of years. We didn’t have the numbers, or strength. So the trees grew back and unregulated. We couldn’t set fires anymore, and we couldn’t cultivate the land. And white people would make certain we never could again. Timber, after all, was the most important export from New England. 
Endless trees and untamed wilderness is a nice fantasy. But it’s a very white fantasy, one that erases the history of my people and of my land. One that paints native peoples are merely parasites leeching off the land, not masters of the earth who new the right balance of hunting and agriculture. It robs us of our agency as people, and takes our accomplishments from us. Moreover, it implies that only white people ever discovered the power to shape the world around them, and that mere brown people can’t possibly have had anything to do with changing our environment.
Don’t bring back untamed wilderness. Bring back my fire setters, my tree sappers, my farmers and my fishers. Bring back my people who were here first. 
Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_use_of_fire#Role_of_fire_by_natives
https://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fsbdev3_000385.pdf
http://www.sidalc.net/repdoc/A11604i/A11604i.pdf
For those curious I recommend reading Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists and the Ecology of New England.https://books.google.com/books/about/Changes_in_the_Land.html?id=AHclmuykdBQCprintsec=frontcoversource=kp_read_button#v=onepageqf=false

virulentblog: plaid-flannel: Seen in the window at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Maine. Photo: Bill Roorbach Except America wasn’t a...

woodland: RECORDS bohemianegyptain: RIP , Jus ran into bro in Woodland Hills smh life is too crazy 😧😢😢😢😢😢
woodland: RECORDS
bohemianegyptain:

RIP , Jus ran into bro in Woodland Hills smh life is too crazy

😧😢😢😢😢😢

bohemianegyptain: RIP , Jus ran into bro in Woodland Hills smh life is too crazy 😧😢😢😢😢😢

woodland: Deer meet kitten
woodland: Deer meet kitten

Deer meet kitten

woodland: A plan to turn Hiawatha Golif Course into Minneapolis' first food forest Tuesday, March 14, 2017 by Taylor Danz in Food & Drink Wikipedia The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea. nativenews: baapi-makwa: http://www.citypages.com/restaurants/a-plan-to-turn-hiawatha-golf-course-into-minneapolis-first-food-forest/416059773 this is awesome 😊 The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea. Imagine a forest filled with edible plants, berries, hazelnuts, and maple trees, bordered by hiking trails. A place where you can learn to forage and harvest while enjoying a beautiful lake and natural wetlands. Now imagine that the forest is located on the edge of Minneapolis. This is what Ryan Seibold and Russ Henry are trying to create near Lake Hiawatha. Parts of the nearby Hiawatha Golf Course have been closed since a 2014 flood, and are expected to reopen this spring. This spurred the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board to explore options for rebuilding the course to make it more flood resistant. Yet these plans stalled when it was discovered that the board was pumping more groundwater from the course – and into the already-polluted Lake Hiawatha – than allowed by the state. The city was left to decide whether to keep pumping or let the former wetland reclaim its territory. Henry, a landscape designer who is running for a Park Board seat, says replacing the course with a food forest would turn a big problem into a big benefit. The restored wetland would act as a natural filter, blocking major pollutants from storm water sewers and bringing back animals and plants displaced by the course, he says. Put simply, a food forest is a woodland that uses native trees, shrubs, and plants that are both edible and medicinal. The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea. Intended to be low-maintenance and self-maintaining once established, the plants are designed to not only build soil but to attract pollinators. (Plants like milkweed are especially beneficial for bees and monarch butterflies.) According to Seibold, the plants would be available for people to forage and harvest as needed. The idea is to teach people to understand the connection between plants and animals, as well as learn when to harvest sustainably. “You’re growing the food, but you’re also growing the community around the food,” Seibold says. There would have to be some sort of foraging training to ensure the plants are available for everyone, Henry adds. When he got his first job in a nursery 20 years ago, Henry says plants were just green things he couldn’t begin to tell apart. Since then, nature has opened up to him, and he would love for the kids of Minneapolis to have the same opportunity. By learning more about what they’re able to take from nature, Henry says that people might feel more empowered to grow food in their own yards, to embrace nature and sustainable development, and to encourage friends and neighbors to do the same. Seibold and Henry say they’ve been getting positive feedback. The park board has until July to decide what to do with the land, but Henry says it may have already decided to reconstruct the golf course. Either way, the men will continue their work. Seibold is working with the board to establish a fruit and nut tree orchard on the east side of the lake, and Henry is helping to coordinate a food innovation lab on March 16 in the Food Building in northeast Minneapolis. The event will showcase ideas for ensuring better soil and water quality, as well as new harvesting techniques and agro projects.
woodland: A plan to turn Hiawatha Golif
 Course into Minneapolis' first
 food forest
 Tuesday, March 14, 2017 by Taylor Danz in Food & Drink
 Wikipedia
 The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and
 hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and
 medicinal herbs like echinacea.
nativenews:
baapi-makwa:

http://www.citypages.com/restaurants/a-plan-to-turn-hiawatha-golf-course-into-minneapolis-first-food-forest/416059773

this is awesome 😊

The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea.

    
Imagine a forest filled with edible plants, berries, hazelnuts, and maple trees, bordered by hiking trails. A place where you can learn to forage and harvest while enjoying a beautiful lake and natural wetlands.


Now imagine that the forest is located on the edge of Minneapolis.


This is what Ryan Seibold and Russ Henry are trying to create near Lake Hiawatha.


Parts of the nearby Hiawatha Golf Course have been closed since a 2014 flood, and are expected to reopen this spring. This spurred the Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board to explore options for rebuilding the course to make it more flood resistant.


Yet these plans stalled when it was discovered that the board was pumping more groundwater from the course – and into the already-polluted Lake Hiawatha – than allowed by the state. The city was left to decide whether to keep pumping or let the former wetland reclaim its territory.


Henry, a landscape designer who is running for a Park Board seat, says replacing the course with a food forest would turn a big problem into a big benefit.


The restored wetland would act as a natural filter, blocking major pollutants from storm water sewers and bringing back animals and plants displaced by the course, he says.


Put simply, a food forest is a woodland that uses native trees, shrubs, and plants that are both edible and medicinal. The city would plant everything from raspberries and blackberries to maple trees and hazelnut trees, as well as shoreline plants like katniss (also known as duck potato) and medicinal herbs like echinacea.



Intended to be low-maintenance and self-maintaining once established, the plants are designed to not only build soil but to attract pollinators. (Plants like milkweed are especially beneficial for bees and monarch butterflies.)


According to Seibold, the plants would be available for people to forage and harvest as needed. The idea is to teach people to understand the connection between plants and animals, as well as learn when to harvest sustainably.


“You’re growing the food, but you’re also growing the community around the food,” Seibold says.


There would have to be some sort of foraging training to ensure the plants are available for everyone, Henry adds.


When he got his first job in a nursery 20 years ago, Henry says plants were just green things he couldn’t begin to tell apart. Since then, nature has opened up to him, and he would love for the kids of Minneapolis to have the same opportunity.


By learning more about what they’re able to take from nature, Henry says that people might feel more empowered to grow food in their own yards, to embrace nature and sustainable development, and to encourage friends and neighbors to do the same.


Seibold and Henry say they’ve been getting positive feedback. The park board has until July to decide what to do with the land, but Henry says it may have already decided to reconstruct the golf course.


Either way, the men will continue their work.


Seibold is working with the board to establish a fruit and nut tree orchard on the east side of the lake, and Henry is helping to coordinate a food innovation lab on March 16 in the Food Building in northeast Minneapolis. The event will showcase ideas for ensuring better soil and water quality, as well as new harvesting techniques and agro projects.

nativenews: baapi-makwa: http://www.citypages.com/restaurants/a-plan-to-turn-hiawatha-golf-course-into-minneapolis-first-food-forest/416...

woodland: francoiskumquatpasqali: dizzy-pup: wildlifewednesdays: A camerashy little weasel! It’s a Mew a pure woodland spirit
woodland: francoiskumquatpasqali:

dizzy-pup:

wildlifewednesdays:

A camerashy little weasel!

It’s a Mew

a pure woodland spirit

francoiskumquatpasqali: dizzy-pup: wildlifewednesdays: A camerashy little weasel! It’s a Mew a pure woodland spirit