Are
Are

Are

Buy
Buy

Buy

The
The

The

But
But

But

Try
Try

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I Try
I Try

I Try

When I Was
When I Was

When I Was

When
When

When

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And

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Forget

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Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d My children will get "privacy" from me when they can pay their own bills and feed themselves. Until then, you do what I say Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends. t 394 687 1,171 Mermaid Hofessional @StarStuffSister Replying to @TheTrillAC I haven't spoken to my mother in ten years. Welcome to your future. 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. meanwhile, my parents… password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission regularly checked our internet browsing history shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them. your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights. nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy
Android, Books, and Children: Agent of Chaos @TheTrillAC 1d
 My children will get "privacy" from me
 when they can pay their own bills and
 feed themselves. Until then, you do what I
 say
 Ain't shit negotiable. We not friends.
 t 394
 687
 1,171
 Mermaid Hofessional
 @StarStuffSister
 Replying to @TheTrillAC
 I haven't spoken to my mother in
 ten years.
 Welcome to your future.
 20:29 06 Nov 19 Twitter for Android
marzipanandminutiae:

greysonderulo:
dragonsspire:


knight-nick:
If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. 
Listen, my parents installed a lock on my door so I could lock everyone out of my room if I wanted to at sometime around 8 years old. They had a key of course for safety but they’ve never had to use it and they’ve never used it when they didn’t have to. 
I was allowed full access to any books, movies, and internet I wanted fully informed about our family beliefs and practices but I was given no supervision once I reached about 13 because my parents trusted me to stick to the rules or not as I felt and come to them if there was anything that I had questions about. 
As long as I said where I was going, who I was with, and when I was going to be back and then phone if anything changed I was allowed to do pretty much as I pleased from 13 onward. 
I moved back in with my parents after university and the first conversation  we had was my dad telling me that if I felt like they were treating me like a child to please tell them because they had no intention of doing so. 
I still live with them and I’m comfortable here as an adult. When I eventually move out again, which I feel no rush to do because I feel respected and given more than enough elbow room, I will probably talk to them often if not everyday. Because they’ve always respected my privacy and my autonomy both physically and emotionally. If you want an independent and fictional child trusting them and giving them their space will do you many more favours than not. 


meanwhile, my parents…
password protected my computer so i had to get permission every time i wanted to use it
put a passcode lock on our pantry so we couldn’t eat without permission
regularly checked our internet browsing history
shut off the internet at regular intervals, including when i needed it for university homework
did monthly checks of our bank statements and would confiscate money if they didn’t approve of our activities
in response, i went behind their backs and opened a new bank account, got a secret job, bought my own groceries, and used the wifi from the school across the street. they didn’t succeed in disciplining me. all they did was force me to distance myself from them.
your children are not your property. they are human beings, and they deserve basic human rights.

nothing in this world teaches you to lie and sneak around like a parent who doesn’t believe you should have privacy

marzipanandminutiae: greysonderulo: dragonsspire: knight-nick: If you think like that, please don’t ever have children. Listen, my paren...

Girls, Obama, and Taken: Steve Silberman @stevesilbermarn Rosaries confiscated from immigrants at the Arizona/Mexico border. [via @MikeOLoughlin] newyorker.com/ culture/photo-, く @claríssalule Remember the piles of wedding rings taken from holocaust victims and how we see it now and wonder how we ever let the violation of human rights get so far well yeah cryptid-sighting: arithanas: gaylileofigaro: This is worse. Looking at these you can tell they have no significant monetary value. They were confiscated as a fear tactic. Nothing more. This picture breaks my heart everytime it appears in my dash. It’s a fear tactic, alright but— The first one in the left corner: It’s a first communion rosary, and it’s not cheap. The black one in the first line: That’s a widow rosary and it’s old. The white one in the second line:  is a commemoration rosary. It has a miniature picture in the round part. I haven’t seen that since the 70′s. In the third line, multicolor one: It’s an Anima mundi, I have only seen those in the hands of Rosary ministery’s old ladies. The oldest ones are from the 80′s after Juan Pablo II came to Mexico for the first time. It’s one of the old ones, I know because the crucifixes are different.  The third one on the fourth line: Red and gold. The style is old, the metal is dark, that’s a 50′s rosary, probably a quinceañera one (or it’s maybe older, from the 40′s when the brides carried red roses with their offerings). The fifth one on the fourth line: It’s a quinceañera rosary with Ignatius’s tear. The style is old and in my part of Mexico is orphan girls who used it. At least it was when I was young.The third one of the fifth line: the blue one with the anchor. That one I have only seen in Veracruz and it doesn’t look new.The fifth one on the fifth line: That’s a 90′s wedding rosary. Black and white patterns were popular on that date.The fourth one on the last line: That’s a first communion rosary from the 30′s. It’s delicate and most probably silver. The rest wrench my heart too, the humble everyday rosaries with wooden beads and knots. Those are cheap and bear the wear and tear of their user handling. But those  I described are much more. Those are mother’s rosaries. Those are not just rosaries. Those are mementos, that’s the proof of their families stories. They are taking from them the only portable things they can carry to feel the connection to their families.It’s not a fear tactic. Call it like by its name.It’s dehumanization. Just want to remind everyone that the DHS janitor who saved these rosaries and photographed them started his project in the latter years of the Bush administration and finished during the latter days of the Obama administration. Just in case anyone reading naively believes this atrocity began on November 8 2016
Girls, Obama, and Taken: Steve Silberman
 @stevesilbermarn
 Rosaries confiscated from immigrants
 at the Arizona/Mexico border. [via
 @MikeOLoughlin] newyorker.com/
 culture/photo-,

 く @claríssalule
 Remember the piles of wedding rings
 taken from holocaust victims and how
 we see it now and wonder how we
 ever let the violation of human rights
 get so far well yeah
cryptid-sighting:
arithanas:

gaylileofigaro:
This is worse. Looking at these you can tell they have no significant monetary value. They were confiscated as a fear tactic. Nothing more. 
This picture breaks my heart everytime it appears in my dash. It’s a fear tactic, alright but—
The first one in the left corner: It’s a first communion rosary, and it’s not cheap.
The black one in the first line: That’s a widow rosary and it’s old.
The white one in the second line:  is a commemoration rosary. It has a miniature picture in the round part. I haven’t seen that since the 70′s.
In the third line, multicolor one: It’s an Anima mundi, I have only seen those in the hands of Rosary ministery’s old ladies. The oldest ones are from the 80′s after Juan Pablo II came to Mexico for the first time. It’s one of the old ones, I know because the crucifixes are different.  The third one on the fourth line: Red and gold. The style is old, the metal is dark, that’s a 50′s rosary, probably a quinceañera one (or it’s maybe older, from the 40′s when the brides carried red roses with their offerings).
The fifth one on the fourth line: It’s a quinceañera rosary with Ignatius’s tear. The style is old and in my part of Mexico is orphan girls who used it. At least it was when I was young.The third one of the fifth line: the blue one with the anchor. That one I have only seen in Veracruz and it doesn’t look new.The fifth one on the fifth line: That’s a 90′s wedding rosary. Black and white patterns were popular on that date.The fourth one on the last line: That’s a first communion rosary from the 30′s. It’s delicate and most probably silver. The rest wrench my heart too, the humble everyday rosaries with wooden beads and knots. Those are cheap and bear the wear and tear of their user handling. But those  I described are much more. 
Those are mother’s rosaries.
Those are not just rosaries. Those are mementos, that’s the proof of their families stories. They are taking from them the only portable things they can carry to feel the connection to their families.It’s not a fear tactic. Call it like by its name.It’s dehumanization.

Just want to remind everyone that the DHS janitor who saved these rosaries and photographed them started his project in the latter years of the Bush administration and finished during the latter days of the Obama administration.
Just in case anyone reading naively believes this atrocity began on November 8 2016

cryptid-sighting: arithanas: gaylileofigaro: This is worse. Looking at these you can tell they have no significant monetary value. They wer...

Target, Tumblr, and Blog: nunyabizni: When the red dot appears When I notice ur bulge uwu
Target, Tumblr, and Blog: nunyabizni:
When the red dot appears

When I notice ur bulge uwu

nunyabizni: When the red dot appears When I notice ur bulge uwu

Books, Food, and Homeless: If you see someone stealing from work lf you see someone shoplifting Mil HOPPERS KEEP IT TO YOURSELF. IDon't defend the system that keeps us in poverty. liamgalgey: be-their-sound: boychic: kaijuleng: tattoosfade: oppressionisntrad: anarchist-memes: We are forced to live in a system that steals from us daily, Kill snitch culture. Important things to keep in mind! - never take from ‘mom and pop’ type store. Its likely you’ll actually harm them, whereas taking from a walmart wont effect much. - never take items that a worker is assigned to monitor (usually super expensive items), theyll be in trouble for it. and its usually a minimum wage worker and usually they lose hours or pay, or they even get fired. - similar to the above, never take things that are usually locked up for the above reason - if its a store you know gives their near-expiration products to workers/charity, try to avoid taking the near expiration products. - if youre taking clothing, avoid leaving hangers. it sounds weird, but itll make it seem like it was more likely an error in the computer than a theft, since the empty hanger sitting there will seem suspicious.  - also for clothing, try not to take more than one item at once, as it will look suspicious if theres 10 medium shirts missing, and it won’t be written off as just a stocking error. and it will lead to workers being penalized - basically just always consider ‘will this harm a worker’ and if the answer is yes then dont do it like i was homeless for a while when i was younger and i tried to follow those guidelines to avoid doing harm to people who were probably not much better off than me while trying to get food for myself. Holy crap, is there like an unspoken thieves code or something?! it’s a thing. I won’t even lie. I watched someone slip a nursing exam book in their bag at the store I worked at. She made eye contact with me and the blood drained from her face. I simply gave her a sympathetic nod and walked away. I live in a small town and I knew she was a waitress at a hotel my sister works at, and people at that hotel don’t tip well during off season. Nursing exam books are 50+ bucks. Being a med student myself, I didn’t even breathe a word, and when inventory came up later and the book was missing, I suggested it was likely a mislabel, and the manager wrote it off. Sometimes, thievery is a necessity. Don’t send people to jail over petty things. theft for many is survival in this system and taking away from multi-billion dollar companies that are a part of the oppressive capitalist system I love this post so much. Like, an unbelievable amount.  And they say there’s no honour among thieves.
Books, Food, and Homeless: If you see someone
 stealing from work
 lf you see someone
 shoplifting
 Mil
 HOPPERS
 KEEP IT TO YOURSELF.
 IDon't defend the system that keeps us in poverty.
liamgalgey:
be-their-sound:

boychic:

kaijuleng:

tattoosfade:

oppressionisntrad:

anarchist-memes:

We are forced to live in a system that steals from us daily, Kill snitch culture.

Important things to keep in mind!
- never take from ‘mom and pop’ type store. Its likely you’ll actually harm them, whereas taking from a walmart wont effect much.
- never take items that a worker is assigned to monitor (usually super expensive items), theyll be in trouble for it. and its usually a minimum wage worker and usually they lose hours or pay, or they even get fired.
- similar to the above, never take things that are usually locked up for the above reason
- if its a store you know gives their near-expiration products to workers/charity, try to avoid taking the near expiration products.
- if youre taking clothing, avoid leaving hangers. it sounds weird, but itll make it seem like it was more likely an error in the computer than a theft, since the empty hanger sitting there will seem suspicious. 
- also for clothing, try not to take more than one item at once, as it will look suspicious if theres 10 medium shirts missing, and it won’t be written off as just a stocking error. and it will lead to workers being penalized
- basically just always consider ‘will this harm a worker’ and if the answer is yes then dont do it
like i was homeless for a while when i was younger and i tried to follow those guidelines to avoid doing harm to people who were probably not much better off than me while trying to get food for myself.

Holy crap, is there like an unspoken thieves code or something?!

it’s a thing. I won’t even lie. I watched someone slip a nursing exam book in their bag at the store I worked at. She made eye contact with me and the blood drained from her face. I simply gave her a sympathetic nod and walked away.
I live in a small town and I knew she was a waitress at a hotel my sister works at, and people at that hotel don’t tip well during off season. Nursing exam books are 50+ bucks. Being a med student myself, I didn’t even breathe a word, and when inventory came up later and the book was missing, I suggested it was likely a mislabel, and the manager wrote it off.
Sometimes, thievery is a necessity. Don’t send people to jail over petty things.

theft for many is survival in this system and taking away from multi-billion dollar companies that are a part of the oppressive capitalist system

I love this post so much. Like, an unbelievable amount. 

And they say there’s no honour among thieves.

liamgalgey: be-their-sound: boychic: kaijuleng: tattoosfade: oppressionisntrad: anarchist-memes: We are forced to live in a system tha...