Equalism
Equalism

Equalism

You Know Its Cold Outside When You Go Outside And Its Cold
You Know Its Cold Outside When You Go Outside And Its Cold

You Know Its Cold Outside When You Go Outside And Its Cold

Tip
Tip

Tip

A Boss
A Boss

A Boss

go outside
 go outside

go outside

life tip
 life tip

life tip

dollars
 dollars

dollars

yours
yours

yours

nts
nts

nts

throwing
throwing

throwing

🔥 | Latest

tipping: So a customer tried tipping me a 5,and I can get fired for that so I said no thanks. He gave me a pat on the arm.
tipping: So a customer tried tipping me a 5,and I can get fired for that so I said no thanks. He gave me a pat on the arm.

So a customer tried tipping me a 5,and I can get fired for that so I said no thanks. He gave me a pat on the arm.

tipping: KEA @KEA_HGA How can this be explained? Same location. Same destination. Same account. Different phones. Different prices l45% 14:24 ae 1 90%+ 14:24 hITArtelTigo Madina University of Ghana, Legon Haatso My location > N4 6 6 MIN My Location Taifa min EAST L Kotoka InternaHonal Arport N1 NI AYAWASO Lapaz Accra Accra osu NIMA CANTONMENTS Rev. Lartey Adotey Apostolic Church> G NORTH AIDGE LABADI Bolt Comfort ST AIDGE OSU GHC 21 GHO 23 Rev, Lartey Adotey Apostolic Church > GHC 25 G 16 MIN 6 MIN Bolt Comfort Cash -GHC 2 PROMO GHC 24 GHC 28 GHC 26 16 MIN 6 MIN SELECT BOLT Cash GHC 2 PROMO SELECT BOLT O Doxologist @Prestige_T The phone on the left has lower battery than the phone on the right. Bolt, Uber, etc raise their prices relative to your battery level (yes, they can do that and they do). KEA @KEA_HGA Sep 17 How can this be explained? Same location. Same destination. Same account. Different phones. Different prices. sotoke nteraa Accra Acgrs Rev Lartey Adetoy Apestolc Church Bolt Comfort GHE 21 RLarty AeteyApestole Church l6 MIN 6 MIN Bolt Confort Cash OHt 2 ROMO GHE 24 GHE 6 MIND SELECT BOLT Cash eRO SELECT BOLT 10:10 PM Sep 18, 2019 Twitter for Android Doxologist @Prestige T Just for some proof. independent.co.uk/life-style/gad.. Uber tried to BS themselves by saying they don't use battery level to make fares more expensive (which back then they di..), but also said "it's a strong predictor" on surge sensitivity - showing they actively collect and use it. BER Uber knows when your phone is about to die Uber knows when the battery on your phone is running low - and that you are more likely to pay higher "surge" prices for a car as a result. The taxi-hailing app.. independent.co.uk 3:58 PM Sep 19, 2019 Twitter for Android that-anglophile: fuckyeahsnackables: uncommonbish: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/uber-knows-when-your-phone-is-about-to-run-out-of-battery-a7042416.html 👏🏿 Capitalism 👏🏿  wants 👏🏿  to 👏🏿 fuck 👏🏿 you 👏🏿 all  👏🏿 the 👏🏿  time. 👏🏿 Just to make this explicit, they’re charging you more if your phone’s about to die because they know you’re scared you’re gonna get stranded. They know you have fewer options. Please remember that under capitalism, it is All like this. DoorDash steals your tips if you give them through the app, or if you notify them that you gave a cash tip. DO NOT TELL them you are tipping in cash! They stole a $20 cash tip from me by “deducting” it from that night’s earnings. I had to work an extra hour to make up for what they stole from me. The CEO should be drawn and quartered.
tipping: KEA
 @KEA_HGA
 How can this be explained? Same location. Same
 destination. Same account. Different phones. Different
 prices

 l45%
 14:24
 ae 1 90%+
 14:24
 hITArtelTigo
 Madina
 University of
 Ghana, Legon
 Haatso
 My location >
 N4 6
 6 MIN
 My Location
 Taifa
 min
 EAST L
 Kotoka
 InternaHonal
 Arport
 N1
 NI
 AYAWASO
 Lapaz
 Accra
 Accra
 osu
 NIMA
 CANTONMENTS
 Rev. Lartey Adotey Apostolic Church>
 G
 NORTH AIDGE
 LABADI
 Bolt
 Comfort
 ST AIDGE
 OSU
 GHC 21
 GHO 23
 Rev, Lartey Adotey Apostolic Church >
 GHC 25
 G
 16 MIN
 6 MIN
 Bolt
 Comfort
 Cash
 -GHC 2 PROMO
 GHC 24
 GHC 28
 GHC 26
 16 MIN
 6 MIN
 SELECT BOLT
 Cash
 GHC 2 PROMO
 SELECT BOLT
 O

 Doxologist
 @Prestige_T
 The phone on the left has lower battery than the phone
 on the right. Bolt, Uber, etc raise their prices relative to
 your battery level (yes, they can do that and they do).
 KEA @KEA_HGA Sep 17
 How can this be explained? Same location. Same destination. Same account.
 Different phones. Different prices.
 sotoke
 nteraa
 Accra
 Acgrs
 Rev Lartey Adetoy Apestolc Church
 Bolt
 Comfort
 GHE 21
 RLarty AeteyApestole Church
 l6 MIN
 6 MIN
 Bolt
 Confort
 Cash
 OHt 2 ROMO
 GHE 24
 GHE
 6 MIND
 SELECT BOLT
 Cash
 eRO
 SELECT BOLT
 10:10 PM Sep 18, 2019 Twitter for Android

 Doxologist
 @Prestige T
 Just for some proof. independent.co.uk/life-style/gad..
 Uber tried to BS themselves by saying they don't use
 battery level to make fares more expensive (which back
 then they di..), but also said "it's a strong predictor"
 on surge sensitivity - showing they actively collect and
 use it.
 BER
 Uber knows when your phone is about to die
 Uber knows when the battery on your phone is running low - and that you are
 more likely to pay higher "surge" prices for a car as a result. The taxi-hailing app..
 independent.co.uk
 3:58 PM Sep 19, 2019 Twitter for Android
that-anglophile:
fuckyeahsnackables:

uncommonbish:
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/uber-knows-when-your-phone-is-about-to-run-out-of-battery-a7042416.html
👏🏿

Capitalism
👏🏿  wants 
👏🏿 

to
👏🏿

 fuck 
👏🏿

you
👏🏿

 all 
👏🏿

 the 
👏🏿 

time.
👏🏿



Just to make this explicit, they’re charging you more if your phone’s about to die because they know you’re scared you’re gonna get stranded. They know you have fewer options. Please remember that under capitalism, it is All like this.

DoorDash steals your tips if you give them through the app, or if you notify them that you gave a cash tip. DO NOT TELL them you are tipping in cash! They stole a $20 cash tip from me by “deducting” it from that night’s earnings. I had to work an extra hour to make up for what they stole from me. The CEO should be drawn and quartered.

that-anglophile: fuckyeahsnackables: uncommonbish: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/uber-knows-when-your-p...

tipping: Friendly to the point that you become suspicious of their intent. 1. Americans generally are more confident in the way they present themselves, most other countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into a room full of different nationalities, l guarantee the American person will be the first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence thing, and I admire it. 2. 3. When they use the imperial system. 4. Wearing sneakers with anything 5. Big smiles, firm handshakes Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!") 6. Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look they have about them (fanny pack, backpack bottled water, camera pouch) compared to various other tourists Asians tend to herd together for safety, while Europeans vary between blend-right-in Scandinavian to designer-brands-everywhere French and traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But Americans are the only ones who seem to view a perfectly civilized, modern city like some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap bottled water. 7. They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I can't even begin to imagine making a sentence where great actually means great. 8. 9. Constant clapping. Being surprised about the topless models on page 3. 10. Speaking as a former barman or "bartender" as American customers would say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a barman. l'll occasionally get bought a drink by drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving me money for doing a job that I was already being paid for? Never happened. I would listen for American accents (which were easy to hear due to their natural loudness) and immediately serve them next. 11. Americans describe distances in driving time, as opposed to miles or kilometers. 12. The dead giveaway is when they call you "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling" 13. 14. North face jackets. Everywhere. Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly. Very often you can hear them before you see them 15. theultimatepumpkinpie: notasupersaiyan-yet: built2bulk: berserkerjerk: pr1nceshawn: Giveaways that someone is American, as told by non-Americans. Accurate. This is oddly comforting. Idk why I was expecting a list of negative shit We do do these things a lot and it’s so nice to hear them in a positive light because so often I feel like we’re hated on. Never in my life have I had someone from another country call us friendly. They always say we’re loud and obnoxious (not that that’s not true, it often can be). It’s such a relief to hear something else.
tipping: Friendly to the point that you become
 suspicious of their intent.
 1.
 Americans generally are more confident in the
 way they present themselves, most other
 countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into
 a room full of different nationalities, l
 guarantee the American person will be the
 first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence
 thing, and I admire it.
 2.
 3.
 When they use the imperial system.
 4.
 Wearing sneakers with anything
 5.
 Big smiles, firm handshakes
 Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your
 aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or
 "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!")
 6.
 Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look
 they have about them (fanny pack, backpack
 bottled water, camera pouch) compared to
 various other tourists Asians tend to herd
 together for safety, while Europeans vary
 between blend-right-in Scandinavian to
 designer-brands-everywhere French and
 traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But
 Americans are the only ones who seem to
 view a perfectly civilized, modern city like
 some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't
 have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap
 bottled water.
 7.

 They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I
 can't even begin to imagine making a sentence
 where great actually means great.
 8.
 9. Constant clapping.
 Being surprised about the topless models
 on page 3.
 10.
 Speaking as a former barman or
 "bartender" as American customers would
 say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a
 barman. l'll occasionally get bought a drink by
 drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving
 me money for doing a job that I was already
 being paid for? Never happened. I would listen
 for American accents (which were easy to hear
 due to their natural loudness) and
 immediately serve them next.
 11.
 Americans describe distances in driving
 time, as opposed to miles or kilometers.
 12.
 The dead giveaway is when they call you
 "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling"
 13.
 14.
 North face jackets. Everywhere.
 Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly.
 Very often you can hear them before you see
 them
 15.
theultimatepumpkinpie:

notasupersaiyan-yet:

built2bulk:

berserkerjerk:

pr1nceshawn:

Giveaways that someone is American, as told by non-Americans.

Accurate.

This is oddly comforting.

Idk why I was expecting a list of negative shit

We do do these things a lot and it’s so nice to hear them in a positive light because so often I feel like we’re hated on. Never in my life have I had someone from another country call us friendly. They always say we’re loud and obnoxious (not that that’s not true, it often can be). It’s such a relief to hear something else.

theultimatepumpkinpie: notasupersaiyan-yet: built2bulk: berserkerjerk: pr1nceshawn: Giveaways that someone is American, as told by n...

tipping: HE WO MAN FE MALE HU MAN PER SON visual-poetry »swofehuperx by richard tipping (+) [vial mitosisisyourtosis men fabricated the idea that they are the default sex to compensate for their biological inferiority and general superfluousness this is not just the natural order this is the language of a patriarchal culture rhysiare Omg no, you are wrong on so many levels and as a linguist this makes me ache something terrible. In my linguistics dass in undergrad, we actually made fun of people who think like you along these lines and for good reason, because you are wholly ignorant and are choosing to spin narratives about things and fields which you know completely nothing about yet pretend you do. 1 She: This word evolved naturally from Old English from seo/heo which were just words to refer to feminine-female people evolving from Proto- Germanic words meaning that/there. He as a word evolved from the same ideas but Proto-Germanic words for thishere, Your idea of patriarchal language further falls apart when you compare this part of English to other Germanic languages, of which English is related, the words in German for he and she are 'er and sie", completely unrelated So it is by clear happenstance, not some patriarchal conspiracy that the words he and "she in English have similar form. 2. Woman: Oh god this one always gets my goat when people go for this one. Man did not used to mean "male", man used to mean humanity/human being, the old words in Old English for male adult person and female adult person were werman and wifman respectively, we can see this relation in words like werewolf and wife as being the remnants of the base "wer- and the base wif-. Woman evolved phonologically from the word wifman by natural processes where the 'f sound dropped and the became lax. Man dropped its wer stem for reasons mostly unknown but I can guarantee have nothing to do with patriarchy because phonological change has no basis in that. 3. Female: Male and Female actually come etymologically from two completely different words. Male comes from Old French masle which meant masculine, while Female came from Old French as well femella which meant young woman. This is another case, just like he and she where the words coincidentally ended up looking similar without having any direct correlation in historical linguistic processes to make them as such 4 Hman: This word etymologically derives from Proto-Indo- European "ghomon which means earthly being as opposed to heavenly being which would refer to gods. You have some small glimmer of hope here in that the word does eventually branch off into the word for man in some languages but this is still too small of a precedent to base any conspiratorial thinking like you are doing off of 5. Person: This one offends me the most, simply because I love the fuck out of Etruscan language and your continued ignorance just irks me at this point. Person derives from persona from Latin which meant the same meaning, which ultimately derived from phersu Etruscan for mask as Etruscans would often have theatre performers use masks to give identity to the performers. So never once did "person have any meaning to do with son So yes, this IS the natural order or language. Please never proselytise your faulty ideology and misandrist thinking within speaking about word origins and morphology again, as unless you actually do fact checking I will school the everloving hell out of you, stay in vour lane. Swofehuper He Man Male Manson
tipping: HE
 WO MAN
 FE MALE
 HU MAN
 PER SON
 visual-poetry
 »swofehuperx by richard tipping (+)
 [vial
 mitosisisyourtosis
 men fabricated the idea that they are the default sex to compensate for their
 biological inferiority and general superfluousness
 this is not just the natural order this is the language of a patriarchal culture
 rhysiare
 Omg no, you are wrong on so many levels and as a linguist this makes me
 ache something terrible. In my linguistics dass in undergrad, we actually made
 fun of people who think like you along these lines and for good reason,
 because you are wholly ignorant and are choosing to spin narratives about
 things and fields which you know completely nothing about yet pretend you do.
 1 She: This word evolved naturally from Old English from seo/heo which
 were just words to refer to feminine-female people evolving from Proto-
 Germanic words meaning that/there. He as a word evolved from the
 same ideas but Proto-Germanic words for thishere, Your idea of
 patriarchal language further falls apart when you compare this part of
 English to other Germanic languages, of which English is related, the
 words in German for he and she are 'er and sie", completely unrelated
 So it is by clear happenstance, not some patriarchal conspiracy that the
 words he and "she in English have similar form.
 2. Woman: Oh god this one always gets my goat when people go for this
 one. Man did not used to mean "male", man used to
 mean humanity/human being, the old words in Old English for male
 adult person and female adult person were werman and wifman
 respectively, we can see this relation in words like werewolf and wife as
 being the remnants of the base "wer- and the base wif-. Woman
 evolved phonologically from the word wifman by natural processes
 where the 'f sound dropped and the became lax. Man dropped
 its wer stem for reasons mostly unknown but I can guarantee have
 nothing to do with patriarchy because phonological change has no
 basis in that.
 3. Female: Male and Female actually come etymologically from two
 completely different words. Male comes from Old French masle which
 meant masculine, while Female came from Old French as well femella
 which meant young woman. This is another case, just like he and she
 where the words coincidentally ended up looking similar without having
 any direct correlation in historical linguistic processes to make them as
 such
 4 Hman: This word etymologically derives from Proto-Indo-
 European "ghomon which means earthly being as opposed to heavenly
 being which would refer to gods. You have some small glimmer of hope
 here in that the word does eventually branch off into the word for man
 in some languages but this is still too small of a precedent to base any
 conspiratorial thinking like you are doing off of
 5. Person: This one offends me the most, simply because I love the fuck
 out of Etruscan language and your continued ignorance just irks me at
 this point. Person derives from persona from Latin which meant the
 same meaning, which ultimately derived from phersu Etruscan
 for mask as Etruscans would often have theatre performers use masks
 to give identity to the performers. So never once did "person have any
 meaning to do with son So yes, this IS the natural order or language.
 Please never proselytise your faulty ideology and misandrist thinking within
 speaking about word origins and morphology again, as unless you actually do
 fact checking I will school the everloving hell out of you, stay in vour lane.
Swofehuper He Man Male Manson

Swofehuper He Man Male Manson

tipping: me, tipping 20% peo FRESH MEME: CATCH IT BEFORE FACEBOOK (SUPERIORITY COMPLEX MEME) via /r/MemeEconomy https://ift.tt/2G6sZAH
tipping: me, tipping 20%
 peo
FRESH MEME: CATCH IT BEFORE FACEBOOK (SUPERIORITY COMPLEX MEME) via /r/MemeEconomy https://ift.tt/2G6sZAH

FRESH MEME: CATCH IT BEFORE FACEBOOK (SUPERIORITY COMPLEX MEME) via /r/MemeEconomy https://ift.tt/2G6sZAH

tipping: softlyfiercely pervocracy: dysgraphicprogrammer pervocracy: How to hack any hospital computer -Use the password taped to the monitor How to hack any hospital computer (L337 version for advanced security systems) -Use the password taped to the back of the monitor As a computer guy: This is what happens when you have too much security. It reaches a tipping point and then suddenly you have none Security at the cost of convenience comes at the cost of security This is true of so many things in healthcare. Example: our software is designed to automatically alert the doctor if a patient's vital signs are critically out of range. If someone has a blood pressure of 200/130, the doc gets a pop-up box that they have to acknowledge before doing anything else. It makes sense, in our setting But then some mega-genius upstairs realized something: the system was only alerting for critical vital signs, but not for all vital signs that could possibly be bad. Like, yeah, 200/130 is potentially life- threatening, but 130/90 is above ideal and can have negative effects on health. Should the doctors be allowed to just ignore something that could negatively affect a patient's health? Heavens no! So now the system generates a pop-up for any vital signs that are even slightly abnormal. A pressure of 120/80 (once considered textbook normal, now considered slightly high) will create the pop up. We have increased our vigilance! Well, no, what we've actually done is train doctors to click through a constant bombardment of pop-ups without looking. We've destroyed their vigilance and made it much easier for them to accidentally skim past life-threatening vital signs But you can't tell that to management, because you'd have to confess that you are a flawed human with limited attention resources They'd tell you "well, all the other doctors take every abnormal vital sign seriously, it sounds like you're being negligent." And if you're smart, you back down before you start telling the big boss all about your habit of ignoring critical safety alert:s The end result is exactly the same as if we had no alerts at all, except with more annoying clicking this here is an absolutely fascinating overview of how and why this happens A fascinating look at the intersection of technology and healthcare, and how we still have a lot to figure out
tipping: softlyfiercely
 pervocracy:
 dysgraphicprogrammer
 pervocracy:
 How to hack any hospital computer
 -Use the password taped to the monitor
 How to hack any hospital computer (L337
 version for advanced security systems)
 -Use the password taped to the back of the monitor
 As a computer guy: This is what happens when you have too much
 security. It reaches a tipping point and then suddenly you have
 none
 Security at the cost of convenience comes at the cost of security
 This is true of so many things in healthcare. Example: our software
 is designed to automatically alert the doctor if a patient's vital signs
 are critically out of range. If someone has a blood pressure of
 200/130, the doc gets a pop-up box that they have to acknowledge
 before doing anything else. It makes sense, in our setting
 But then some mega-genius upstairs realized something: the system
 was only alerting for critical vital signs, but not for all vital signs that
 could possibly be bad. Like, yeah, 200/130 is potentially life-
 threatening, but 130/90 is above ideal and can have negative effects
 on health. Should the doctors be allowed to just ignore something
 that could negatively affect a patient's health? Heavens no!
 So now the system generates a pop-up for any vital signs that are
 even slightly abnormal. A pressure of 120/80 (once considered
 textbook normal, now considered slightly high) will create the pop
 up. We have increased our vigilance!
 Well, no, what we've actually done is train doctors to click through a
 constant bombardment of pop-ups without looking. We've destroyed
 their vigilance and made it much easier for them to accidentally skim
 past life-threatening vital signs
 But you can't tell that to management, because you'd have to confess
 that you are a flawed human with limited attention resources
 They'd tell you "well, all the other doctors take every abnormal vital
 sign seriously, it sounds like you're being negligent." And if you're
 smart, you back down before you start telling the big boss all about
 your habit of ignoring critical safety alert:s
 The end result is exactly the same as if we had no alerts at all, except
 with more annoying clicking
 this here is an absolutely fascinating overview of how and why this
 happens
A fascinating look at the intersection of technology and healthcare, and how we still have a lot to figure out

A fascinating look at the intersection of technology and healthcare, and how we still have a lot to figure out

tipping: 15 Dead Giveaways That Somebody Is American, As Told Bv Non-Americans. Friendly to the point that you become suspicious of their intent 1. Americans generally are more confident in the way they present themselves, most other countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into a room full of different nationalities, I guarantee the American person will be the first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence thing, and I admire it. 2. 3. When they use the imperial system. 4. Wearing sneakers with anything 5. Big smiles, firm handshakes Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!") 6. Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look they have about them (fanny pack, backpack, bottled water, camera pouch) compared to various other tourists Asians tend to herd together for safety, while Europeans vary between blend-right-in Scandinavian to designer-brands-everywhere French and traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But Americans are the only ones who seem to view a perfectly civilized, modern city like some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap bottled water. 7. 8. They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I can't even begin to imagine making a sentence where great actually means great. 9. Constant clapping Being surprised about the topless models on page 3. 10. Speaking as a former barman or "bartender" as American customers would say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a barman. I'll occasionally get bought a drink by drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving me money for doing a job that I was already being paid for? Never happened. I would listen for American accents (which were easy to hear due to their natural loudness) and immediately serve them next. 11. Americans describe distances in driving time, as opposed to miles or kilometers. 12. The dead giveaway is when they call you "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling". 13. 14. North face jackets. Everywhere. Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly Very often you can hear them before you see them 15. srsfunny:We Do Love Americans
tipping: 15 Dead Giveaways That
 Somebody Is American,
 As Told Bv Non-Americans.
 Friendly to the point that you become
 suspicious of their intent
 1.
 Americans generally are more confident in the
 way they present themselves, most other
 countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into
 a room full of different nationalities, I
 guarantee the American person will be the
 first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence
 thing, and I admire it.
 2.
 3.
 When they use the imperial system.
 4.
 Wearing sneakers with anything
 5.
 Big smiles, firm handshakes
 Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your
 aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or
 "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!")
 6.
 Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look
 they have about them (fanny pack, backpack,
 bottled water, camera pouch) compared to
 various other tourists Asians tend to herd
 together for safety, while Europeans vary
 between blend-right-in Scandinavian to
 designer-brands-everywhere French and
 traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But
 Americans are the only ones who seem to
 view a perfectly civilized, modern city like
 some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't
 have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap
 bottled water.
 7.
 8. They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I
 can't even begin to imagine making a sentence
 where great actually means great.
 9. Constant clapping
 Being surprised about the topless models
 on page 3.
 10.
 Speaking as a former barman or
 "bartender" as American customers would
 say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a
 barman. I'll occasionally get bought a drink by
 drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving
 me money for doing a job that I was already
 being paid for? Never happened. I would listen
 for American accents (which were easy to hear
 due to their natural loudness) and
 immediately serve them next.
 11.
 Americans describe distances in driving
 time, as opposed to miles or kilometers.
 12.
 The dead giveaway is when they call you
 "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling".
 13.
 14.
 North face jackets. Everywhere.
 Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly
 Very often you can hear them before you see
 them
 15.
srsfunny:We Do Love Americans

srsfunny:We Do Love Americans

tipping: Friendly to the point that you become suspicious of their intent. 1. Americans generally are more confident in the way they present themselves, most other countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into a room full of different nationalities, l guarantee the American person will be the first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence thing, and I admire it. 2. 3. When they use the imperial system. 4. Wearing sneakers with anything 5. Big smiles, firm handshakes Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!") 6. Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look they have about them (fanny pack, backpack bottled water, camera pouch) compared to various other tourists Asians tend to herd together for safety, while Europeans vary between blend-right-in Scandinavian to designer-brands-everywhere French and traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But Americans are the only ones who seem to view a perfectly civilized, modern city like some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap bottled water. 7. They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I can't even begin to imagine making a sentence where great actually means great. 8. 9. Constant clapping. Being surprised about the topless models on page 3. 10. Speaking as a former barman or "bartender" as American customers would say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a barman. l'll occasionally get bought a drink by drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving me money for doing a job that I was already being paid for? Never happened. I would listen for American accents (which were easy to hear due to their natural loudness) and immediately serve them next. 11. Americans describe distances in driving time, as opposed to miles or kilometers. 12. The dead giveaway is when they call you "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling" 13. 14. North face jackets. Everywhere. Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly. Very often you can hear them before you see them 15. strixus: acavatica: fairkid-forever: kkatkkrap: dfwm: mymindsecho: pr1nceshawn: Giveaways that someone is American, as told by non-Americans. Americans tag yourself: I’m friendly to the point that your suspicious of my intent mixed with calling you sweetie, darling, honey, etc. im the barman I’m “easy to hear due to their natural loudness.” I’m “they say great without being sarcastic” I’m “uses big adjectives generously.” I’m #7 even in my own city.
tipping: Friendly to the point that you become
 suspicious of their intent.
 1.
 Americans generally are more confident in the
 way they present themselves, most other
 countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into
 a room full of different nationalities, l
 guarantee the American person will be the
 first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence
 thing, and I admire it.
 2.
 3.
 When they use the imperial system.
 4.
 Wearing sneakers with anything
 5.
 Big smiles, firm handshakes
 Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your
 aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or
 "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!")
 6.
 Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look
 they have about them (fanny pack, backpack
 bottled water, camera pouch) compared to
 various other tourists Asians tend to herd
 together for safety, while Europeans vary
 between blend-right-in Scandinavian to
 designer-brands-everywhere French and
 traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But
 Americans are the only ones who seem to
 view a perfectly civilized, modern city like
 some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't
 have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap
 bottled water.
 7.

 They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I
 can't even begin to imagine making a sentence
 where great actually means great.
 8.
 9. Constant clapping.
 Being surprised about the topless models
 on page 3.
 10.
 Speaking as a former barman or
 "bartender" as American customers would
 say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a
 barman. l'll occasionally get bought a drink by
 drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving
 me money for doing a job that I was already
 being paid for? Never happened. I would listen
 for American accents (which were easy to hear
 due to their natural loudness) and
 immediately serve them next.
 11.
 Americans describe distances in driving
 time, as opposed to miles or kilometers.
 12.
 The dead giveaway is when they call you
 "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling"
 13.
 14.
 North face jackets. Everywhere.
 Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly.
 Very often you can hear them before you see
 them
 15.
strixus:

acavatica:

fairkid-forever:

kkatkkrap:

dfwm:

mymindsecho:

pr1nceshawn:

Giveaways that someone is American, as told by non-Americans.

Americans tag yourself: I’m friendly to the point that your suspicious of my intent mixed with calling you sweetie, darling, honey, etc.

im the barman

I’m “easy to hear due to their natural loudness.”

I’m “they say great without being sarcastic”

I’m “uses big adjectives generously.”

I’m #7 even in my own city.

strixus: acavatica: fairkid-forever: kkatkkrap: dfwm: mymindsecho: pr1nceshawn: Giveaways that someone is American, as told by non...

tipping: 20 Of The Weirdest Things About America That Americans Don't Realize Are Weird 1. Portion Sizes. 2. Flags everywhere. EVERYWHERE 3. Price tags without tax included. How do you know how much you're spending until you get to the cashier? 4. Tipping: It was incredibly hard for me to wrap my head about how much is appropriate for the service 5. Advertising prescription drugs. That was the weirdest one for me. "ask your doctor for brand x antidepressants" type commercials on TV. In the UK, your doctor tells you what drugs you should take, not the other way round 6. Everything being designed around cars. 7. The sheer amount of commercials on the television, and their lack of quality 8. Aerosol cheese. Like seriously I would try it at least once, but that shit looks like cancer 9. a visiting Italian friend was very puzzled at Americans' use of the phrase, "Oh, really?" in group conversations. Somehow he took that as a person challenging his opinion, when in reality, it's just some habit a lot of us have that basically means, "Interesting. Can you elaborate?" The guy was red in the face after an hour because he literally thought everyone in our group was challenging every single thing he said 10. Your toilets are too low down and the stalls have massive gaps around the door so that people can see in. You can put a man on the moon but can't design a setup whereby I can have a dump in comfortable privacy. Sort it out America 11. Pickles. Your hidden love for pickles. I have been in the states for like 8 years and you guys give a pickle with everything. 12. I find it really weird how college football players are kind of celebrities. They're scrutinized and have fans and do TV interviews, and it just boggles my mind so much. They're just students that do an extra- curricular activity! I don't understand 13. Jaywalking is a crime? I did this a lot in the US without realizing it was supposed to be illegal 14. Why is bread in the USA so sweet? Sandwich bread, hamburger buns, taste like cake but Americans have no idea what you're talking about because they're used to it. 15. Soft drink is free flowing, everywhere McDonalds you get a gigantic cup for a dollar - it comes with unlimited refills. Even at a restaurant if you half finish your coke the waitress will bring you another one. The first time you're like "hey I didn't order this" but then you realize it's free 16. You are all so loud! But friendly 17. There is so much water in your toilet bowls! Seriously, why so much? 18. A very blasé approach to credit card security Signatures don't matter and no one uses a PIN 19. The pledge of allegiance is creepy. I know most Americans just say it because they have to in school but if you listen to the words it sounds strange to have children just chanting it off 20. Lawyer adverts, everywhere. Saul Goodman laughoutloud-club: The Weirdest Things About America
tipping: 20 Of The Weirdest Things About
 America That Americans Don't
 Realize Are Weird
 1. Portion Sizes.
 2. Flags everywhere. EVERYWHERE
 3.
 Price tags without tax included. How do you
 know how much you're spending until you
 get to the cashier?
 4. Tipping: It was incredibly hard for me to
 wrap my head about how much is
 appropriate for the service
 5. Advertising prescription drugs. That was the
 weirdest one for me. "ask your doctor for
 brand x antidepressants" type commercials
 on TV. In the UK, your doctor tells you what
 drugs you should take, not the other way
 round
 6. Everything being designed around cars.
 7.
 The sheer amount of commercials on the
 television, and their lack of quality
 8. Aerosol cheese. Like seriously I would try it
 at least once, but that shit looks like cancer
 9. a visiting Italian friend was very puzzled at
 Americans' use of the phrase, "Oh, really?" in
 group conversations. Somehow he took that
 as a person challenging his opinion, when in
 reality, it's just some habit a lot of us have
 that basically means, "Interesting. Can you
 elaborate?" The guy was red in the face after
 an hour because he literally thought
 everyone in our group was challenging every
 single thing he said
 10.
 Your toilets are too low down and the stalls
 have massive gaps around the door so that
 people can see in. You can put a man on the
 moon but can't design a setup whereby I can
 have a dump in comfortable privacy. Sort it
 out America
 11. Pickles. Your hidden love for pickles. I have
 been in the states for like 8 years and you
 guys give a pickle with everything.
 12. I find it really weird how college football
 players are kind of celebrities. They're
 scrutinized and have fans and do TV
 interviews, and it just boggles my mind so
 much. They're just students that do an extra-
 curricular activity! I don't understand
 13. Jaywalking is a crime? I did this a lot in the
 US without realizing it was supposed to be
 illegal
 14. Why is bread in the USA so sweet? Sandwich
 bread, hamburger buns, taste like cake but
 Americans have no idea what you're talking
 about because they're used to it.
 15. Soft drink is free flowing, everywhere
 McDonalds you get a gigantic cup for a dollar
 - it comes with unlimited refills. Even at a
 restaurant if you half finish your coke the
 waitress will bring you another one. The first
 time you're like "hey I didn't order this" but
 then you realize it's free
 16. You are all so loud! But friendly
 17. There is so much water in your toilet bowls!
 Seriously, why so much?
 18. A very blasé approach to credit card security
 Signatures don't matter and no one uses a
 PIN
 19. The pledge of allegiance is creepy. I know
 most Americans just say it because they have
 to in school but if you listen to the words it
 sounds strange to have children just chanting
 it off
 20. Lawyer adverts, everywhere. Saul Goodman
laughoutloud-club:

The Weirdest Things About America

laughoutloud-club: The Weirdest Things About America