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Ass, Bad, and Blade: 1AM glyndarling: aerylon: loloftheday: Let’s see you little punks smash my letterbox now This reminds me of this guy who used to live on my dad’s street.   Every time it snowed, the snow plow would take out his mailbox - and only his mail box.  And just to be clear - it was done intentionally.  No one knows why, but the driver of the snow plow would target his box and mow it down.  He’d call the DOT to complain, and would get an earful of excuses that amounted to “not our fault you have a wimpy mailbox.”   Fast forward to the next winter.  First decent snow starts falling, and every kid is hoping for a snow day.  It was right around 4:30 am that the whole neighborhood was woken up to this loud CLANG and the screech of tearing metal.  My dad made it to the window first and started laughing his ass off. Sitting out side was one very totaled, and almost ripped in half, snow plow.  And these weren’t little pick-up trucks with a blade on the front, we have these up in NY: Well, turns out over the summer, my dad’s neighbor got himself a backhoe and sank a steel I beam into the ground in his front yard.  Then he covered it with a decorative wood sleeve and topped it with a brand new mailbox.  When the snowplow driver tried to mow it down it was a bad case of immovable object meets unstoppable force - and the mailbox won.  With the plow firmly impaled on the I beam, it was very clear that the driver had gone out of his way to hit it.   Naturally, the DOT wasn’t happy, and the neighbor’s reply was simple: “Not my faulty you have a wimpy snowplow.”  They did try to sue him for the damages, but as he had gone to the town, gotten approval for the post and its installation, and made sure everything was up to code, it was thrown out pretty quick.   And for anyone wondering about the driver…  He was fine.  His job and tighty-whiteys … not so much. That is a very satisfying read.
Ass, Bad, and Blade: 1AM
glyndarling:

aerylon:

loloftheday:

Let’s see you little punks smash my letterbox now

This reminds me of this guy who used to live on my dad’s street.  

Every time it snowed, the snow plow would take out his mailbox - and only his mail box.  And just to be clear - it was done intentionally.  No one knows why, but the driver of the snow plow would target his box and mow it down.  He’d call the DOT to complain, and would get an earful of excuses that amounted to “not our fault you have a wimpy mailbox.”  

Fast forward to the next winter.  First decent snow starts falling, and every kid is hoping for a snow day.  It was right around 4:30 am that the whole neighborhood was woken up to this loud CLANG and the screech of tearing metal.  My dad made it to the window first and started laughing his ass off.

Sitting out side was one very totaled, and almost ripped in half, snow plow.  And these weren’t little pick-up trucks with a blade on the front, we have these up in NY:

Well, turns out over the summer, my dad’s neighbor got himself a backhoe and sank a steel I beam into the ground in his front yard.  Then he covered it with a decorative wood sleeve and topped it with a brand new mailbox.  When the snowplow driver tried to mow it down it was a bad case of immovable object meets unstoppable force - and the mailbox won.  With the plow firmly impaled on the I beam, it was very clear that the driver had gone out of his way to hit it.  

Naturally, the DOT wasn’t happy, and the neighbor’s reply was simple: “Not my faulty you have a wimpy snowplow.”  They did try to sue him for the damages, but as he had gone to the town, gotten approval for the post and its installation, and made sure everything was up to code, it was thrown out pretty quick.  

And for anyone wondering about the driver…  He was fine.  His job and tighty-whiteys … not so much.


That is a very satisfying read.

glyndarling: aerylon: loloftheday: Let’s see you little punks smash my letterbox now This reminds me of this guy who used to live on my ...

Advice, Children, and Click: Mr. Rogers used a set of 9 simple rules when talking to children. He did this to be more inclusive and avoid confusion because he knew children would often hear things literally. Ultrafacts.tumblr.com ultrafacts: 1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​ 2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe. 3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.” 4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play. 5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play. 6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. 7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them. 8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them. 9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing. Source: [x] Click HERE for more facts
Advice, Children, and Click: Mr. Rogers used a set of 9 simple rules
 when talking to children. He did this to be
 more inclusive and avoid confusion
 because he knew children would often
 hear things literally.
 Ultrafacts.tumblr.com
ultrafacts:
1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​
2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.
3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”
4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.
5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.
6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.
7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.
8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.
9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing.
Source: [x]
Click HERE for more facts

ultrafacts: 1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangero...

Burger King, Clothes, and Food: Burger King Worker DENMARK UNITED STATES S20 an hour 5Weeks paid vacation Pension Plarn Doesn't have to struggle to get by. $9an hour No paid vacation No Pension Plan Has to choose between buying food or clothes. fightfor15.org fb.com/fightfor151@fightfor15 iopele: queerspeculativefiction: heidiblack: pillowswithboners: luchagcaileag: This isn’t because Burger King is nicer in Denmark. It’s the law, and the US is actually the only so-called “developed” country that doesn’t mandate jobs provide a minimum amount of paid vacation, sick leave, or both. kinda debunks that claim that they can’t afford to pay their workers those sort of wages and still make a profit Its corporate greed, plain and simple. It is the same in Sweden. It is so funny every time an american company opens up offices here and then tries to do it the american way and all the unions go “I don’t think so”. Like when Toys ‘r Us opened in sweden 1995. They refused to sign on to the union deals that govern such things as pay/pension and vacation in Sweden. Most of our rights are not mandated by law (we don’t have a minimum wage for example) but are made in voluntary agreements between the unions and the companies. But they refused, saying that they had never negotiated with any unions anywhere else in the world and weren’t planning to do it in Sweden either.  Of course a lot of people thought it was useless fighting against an international giant, but Handels (the store worker’s union) said that they could not budge, because that might mean that the whole Swedish model might crumble. So they went on strike in the three stores that the company had opened so far. Cue a shitstorm from the press, and from right wing politicians. But the members were all for it, and other unions started doing sympathy actions. The teamsters refused to deliver goods to their stores, the financial unions blockaded all economical transactions regarding Toys ‘r Us and the strike got strong international support as well, especially in the US. In the end, Toys ‘r Us caved in, signed the union deal, and thus their employees got the same treatment as Swedish store workers everywhere. The right to be treated as bloody human beings and not disposable cogs in a machine. and that story right there? is exactly why Republicans in the US work so hard to bust unions. it’s because unionizing WORKS and they’re terrified of workers actually having some power.
Burger King, Clothes, and Food: Burger King Worker
 DENMARK UNITED STATES
 S20 an hour
 5Weeks paid vacation
 Pension Plarn
 Doesn't have to struggle
 to get by.
 $9an hour
 No paid vacation
 No Pension Plan
 Has to choose between
 buying food or clothes.
 fightfor15.org fb.com/fightfor151@fightfor15
iopele:

queerspeculativefiction:

heidiblack:

pillowswithboners:

luchagcaileag:

This isn’t because Burger King is nicer in Denmark. It’s the law, and the US is actually the only so-called “developed” country that doesn’t mandate jobs provide a minimum amount of paid vacation, sick leave, or both.

kinda debunks that claim that they can’t afford to pay their workers those sort of wages and still make a profit

Its corporate greed, plain and simple.

It is the same in Sweden. It is so funny every time an american company opens up offices here and then tries to do it the american way and all the unions go “I don’t think so”.
Like when Toys ‘r Us opened in sweden 1995.
They refused to sign on to the union deals that govern such things as pay/pension and vacation in Sweden. Most of our rights are not mandated by law (we don’t have a minimum wage for example) but are made in voluntary agreements between the unions and the companies.
But they refused, saying that they had never negotiated with any unions anywhere else in the world and weren’t planning to do it in Sweden either. 
Of course a lot of people thought it was useless fighting against an international giant, but Handels (the store worker’s union) said that they could not budge, because that might mean that the whole Swedish model might crumble. So they went on strike in the three stores that the company had opened so far.
Cue a shitstorm from the press, and from right wing politicians. But the members were all for it, and other unions started doing sympathy actions. The teamsters refused to deliver goods to their stores, the financial unions blockaded all economical transactions regarding Toys ‘r Us and the strike got strong international support as well, especially in the US.
In the end, Toys ‘r Us caved in, signed the union deal, and thus their employees got the same treatment as Swedish store workers everywhere.
The right to be treated as bloody human beings and not disposable cogs in a machine.


and that story right there? is exactly why Republicans in the US work so hard to bust unions. it’s because unionizing WORKS and they’re terrified of workers actually having some power.

iopele: queerspeculativefiction: heidiblack: pillowswithboners: luchagcaileag: This isn’t because Burger King is nicer in Denmark. It’s...

Life, Shit, and Teacher: votgs lady-feral "The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50 pounds of pots rated an "A", 40 pounds a "B", and so on Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only one pot albeit a perfect one to get an "A" Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay." Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety) Perfection is intimidating. I think most artists blocks come from the fear of creating something imperfect. (via buttastic) putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually itl be good shit. maybe most of it will just be shit but you can't make good shit if you're not making a lot of shit. GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS. (via aintgotnoladytronblues) Kind of important. Ive spent way too much of my life thinking about the perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things. 26,336 notes
Life, Shit, and Teacher: votgs lady-feral
 "The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing
 the class into two groups.
 All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely
 on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on
 its quality.
 His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in
 his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity" group: 50
 pounds of pots rated an "A", 40 pounds a "B", and so on
 Those being graded on "quality", however, needed to produce only
 one pot albeit a perfect one to get an "A"
 Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of
 highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for
 quantity
 It seems that while the "quantity" group was busily churning out piles
 of work-and learning from their mistakes the "quality" group had
 sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show
 for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay."
 Art and Fear- David Bayles and Ted Orland (via qweety)
 Perfection is intimidating. I think most artists blocks come from the fear of
 creating something imperfect.
 (via buttastic)
 putting it even more simply: just make shit. eventually itl be good shit.
 maybe most of it will just be shit but you can't make good shit if you're not
 making a lot of shit.
 GET EXCITED AND MAKE THINGS.
 (via aintgotnoladytronblues)
 Kind of important. Ive spent way too much of my life thinking about the
 perfect things I could make without actually making the damned things.
 26,336 notes