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Relying: pervocracy child handling for the childless urse My current job has me working with children, which is kind of a weird shock after years in environments where a young" patient is 40 years old. Here's my impressions so far Birth 1 year: Essentially a smail cute animal. Handle accordingly, gently and affectionately, but relying heavily on the caregivers and with no real expectation of cooperation Age 1-2: Hates you. Hates you so much. You can smile, you can coo, you can attempt to soothe they hate you anyway, because you're a stranger and you're scary and you're touching them. There's no winning this so just get it over with as quickly and non-traumatically as possible Age 3-5: Nervous around medical things, but possible to soothe. Easily upset but also easily distracted from the thing that upset them. Smartphone cartoons and who wants a stickerrl1?1? are key management techniques Age 6 10: Really cool, actually. I did not realize kids were this cool. Around this age they tend to be fairly outgoing, and super curious and eager to learn. Absolutely do not babytalk, instead, flatter them with how grown-up they are teach them some Fun Gross Medical Facts, and introduce potentially frightening experiences with hey, you want to see something really cool?" Age 11 14: Extremely variable. Can be very childish or very mature, or rapidly switch from one mode to the other. At this point you can almost treat them as an adult, just... a really sensitive and unpredictable adult Do not, under any circumstances, offer stickers. (But they might grab one out of the bin anyway.) Age 15-18: Basically an adult with severely limited life experience. Treat as an adult who needs a littie extra education with their care. Keep parents out of the room as much as possible, unless the kid wants them there. At this point you can go ahead and offer stickers again, because they'll probably think it's funny And they'll want one. Deep down, everyone wants a sticker nurse unlocks secret to raising kids
Relying: pervocracy
 child handling for the childless
 urse
 My current job has me working with children, which is kind of a weird shock after
 years in environments where a young" patient is 40 years old. Here's my
 impressions so far
 Birth 1 year: Essentially a smail cute animal. Handle accordingly, gently and
 affectionately, but relying heavily on the caregivers and with no real expectation
 of cooperation
 Age 1-2: Hates you. Hates you so much. You can smile, you can coo, you can
 attempt to soothe they hate you anyway, because you're a stranger and you're
 scary and you're touching them. There's no winning this so just get it over with
 as quickly and non-traumatically as possible
 Age 3-5: Nervous around medical things, but possible to soothe. Easily upset
 but also easily distracted from the thing that upset them. Smartphone cartoons
 and who wants a stickerrl1?1? are key management techniques
 Age 6 10: Really cool, actually. I did not realize kids were this cool. Around
 this age they tend to be fairly outgoing, and super curious and eager to learn.
 Absolutely do not babytalk, instead, flatter them with how grown-up they are
 teach them some Fun Gross Medical Facts, and introduce potentially frightening
 experiences with hey, you want to see something really cool?"
 Age 11 14: Extremely variable. Can be very childish or very mature, or rapidly
 switch from one mode to the other. At this point you can almost treat them as an
 adult, just... a really sensitive and unpredictable adult Do not, under any
 circumstances, offer stickers. (But they might grab one out of the bin anyway.)
 Age 15-18: Basically an adult with severely limited life experience. Treat as an
 adult who needs a littie extra education with their care. Keep parents out of the
 room as much as possible, unless the kid wants them there. At this point you
 can go ahead and offer stickers again, because they'll probably think it's funny
 And they'll want one. Deep down, everyone wants a sticker
nurse unlocks secret to raising kids

nurse unlocks secret to raising kids

Relying: CITY OF ATLANTA PUBLIC NOTICE URG ATLAY LANTA Please Do Not Dump Trash on White Supremacist Leaders' Properties People have been dumping trash on the properties of well-known white nationalists Sam Dickson and Evan Anderson. Dickson has said that this dumping is a financial hardship, and it interferes with his plans of gentrifying the Lakewood area and forcing out people of color. He and Anderson are very busy organizing with other white supremacists, including attending white pride rallies and providing violent white supremacists with material support. It has been too costly for them to hire security at each of these properties, and it is not possible for police to watch them at all times. So we are relying on your honor and goodwill to refrain from dumping garbage or doing other property damage to these locations, such as breaking windows and spray painting "Nazis get out". If the dumping continues, Dickson and Anderson may even be forced to sell the properties at a loss. Here is a list of Sam Dickson's and Evan Anderson's properties to please not dump any trash on: Hickory Hill 1185 run by Sam Dickson Six lots on Rhodesia Ave (A and B on map) 14 005700210453 14 005700220320 14 005700230360 14 005700230352 14 005700230345 Turman Ave .14 0057 LL0053 Rhodesia Ave SE Sun Rising run by Evan Anderson 1701 Jonesboro Rd 54 building (D on map) Adair Ave SE Three lots on Lakewood Ave (C on map) 14 005700250327 14 005700250335 14 005700250343 Claire Dr SE ire Dr SE . The Beltem Trust managed by Sam Dickson 139 Rhodesia Ave (Part of B on map) 1445 Parsons St SE (Part of B on map) 路 antisolanum: antifainternational: C鈥檓on now Atlanta they鈥檙e asking ever-so nicely! I鈥檓 glad they gave specific addresses so the good people of atlanta know where not to dump their used diapers en masse
Relying: CITY OF ATLANTA
 PUBLIC NOTICE
 URG
 ATLAY
 LANTA
 Please Do Not Dump Trash
 on White Supremacist Leaders' Properties
 People have been dumping trash on the properties of well-known white nationalists Sam Dickson and Evan
 Anderson. Dickson has said that this dumping is a financial hardship, and it interferes with his plans of gentrifying
 the Lakewood area and forcing out people of color. He and Anderson are very busy organizing with other white
 supremacists, including attending white pride rallies and providing violent white supremacists with material
 support.
 It has been too costly for them to hire security at each of these properties, and it is not possible for police to
 watch them at all times. So we are relying on your honor and goodwill to refrain from dumping garbage or doing
 other property damage to these locations, such as breaking windows and spray painting "Nazis get out". If the
 dumping continues, Dickson and Anderson may even be forced to sell the properties at a loss.
 Here is a list of Sam Dickson's and Evan Anderson's properties to please not dump any trash on:
 Hickory Hill 1185
 run by Sam Dickson
 Six lots on Rhodesia Ave (A and B on map)
 14 005700210453
 14 005700220320
 14 005700230360
 14 005700230352
 14 005700230345
 Turman Ave
 .14 0057 LL0053
 Rhodesia Ave SE
 Sun Rising
 run by Evan Anderson
 1701 Jonesboro Rd
 54
 building (D on map)
 Adair Ave SE
 Three lots on Lakewood
 Ave (C on map)
 14 005700250327
 14 005700250335
 14 005700250343
 Claire Dr SE
 ire Dr SE
 .
 The Beltem Trust
 managed by Sam
 Dickson
 139 Rhodesia Ave (Part of B on map)
 1445 Parsons St SE (Part of B on map)
 路
antisolanum:
antifainternational:
C鈥檓on now Atlanta they鈥檙e asking ever-so nicely!

I鈥檓 glad they gave specific addresses so the good people of atlanta know where not to dump their used diapers en masse

antisolanum: antifainternational: C鈥檓on now Atlanta they鈥檙e asking ever-so nicely! I鈥檓 glad they gave specific addresses so the good peo...

Relying: REMEMBER Turn your computer off before midnight orn 12/31/99. BUY tamashiihiroka: forloveofreason: shananaomi: jaybushman: spytap: ralfmaximus: faisdm: the-most-calamitous: jibini: top-lotad-breeder: chocogoat: what. why? someone pls explain to me pls i wasnt born yet in 1999 why turn computer off before midnight? what happen if u dont? y2k lol everyone was like 鈥渢he supervirus is gonna take over the world and ruin everything and end the world!!!鈥 This is the oldest I鈥檝e ever felt. Right now. WHAT THE FUCK DO YOU MEAN YOU WEREN鈥橳 BORN YET IN 1999. Ahh the Millenium bug. It wasn鈥檛 a virus, it was an issue with how some old computers at the time were programmed to deal with dates. Basically some computers with older operating systems didn鈥檛 have anything in place to deal with the year reaching 99 and looping around to 00. It was believed that this inability to sync with the correct date would cause issues, and even crash entire systems the moment the date changed. People flipped out about it, convinced that the date discrepancy between netwoked systems would bring down computers everywhere and shut down the internet and so all systems relying on computers, including plane navigation etc. would go down causing worldwide chaos. It was genuinely believed that people should all switch off computers to avoid this. One or two smart people spoke up and said 鈥渦m hey, this actually will only effect a few very outdated computers and they鈥檒l just display the wrong date, so it probably won鈥檛 be harmful鈥 but were largely ignored because people selling books about the end of the world were talking louder. In the end, absolutely nothing happened. Oh gosh. I鈥檝e been a programmer working for various government agencies since the early 1990s and I can say with some confidence: NOTHING HAPPENED BECAUSE WE WORKED VERY HARD FIXING SHIT THAT MOST DEFINITELY WOULD HAVE BROKEN ON 1-JAN-2000. One example I personally worked on: vaccination databases. My contract was with the CDC to coordinate immunization registries 鈥 you know, kids鈥 vaccine histories. What they got, when they got it, and (most importantly) which vaccines they were due to get next and when. These were state-wide registries, containing millions of records each. Most of these systems were designed in the 1970s and 1980s, and stored the child鈥檚 DOB year as only two digits. This means that 鈥 had we not fixed it 鈥 just about every child in all the databases I worked on would have SUDDENLY AGED OUT OF THE PROGRAM 1-JAN-2000. In other words: these kids would suddenly be 鈥渢oo old鈥 to receive critical vaccines. Okay, so that鈥檚 not a nuke plant exploding or airplanes dropping from the sky. In fact, nothing obvious would have occurred come Jan 1st. BUT Without the software advising doctors when to give vaccinations, an entire generation鈥檚 immunity to things like measles, mumps, smallpox (etc) would have been compromised. And nobody would even know there was a problem for months 鈥 possibly years 鈥 after. You think the fun & games caused by a few anti-vaxers is bad? Imagine whole populations going unvaccinated by accident鈥 one case of measles and the death toll might be measured in millions. This is one example I KNOW to be true, because I was there. I also know that in the years leading up to 2000 there were ad-hoc discussion groups (particularly alt.risk) of amazed programmers and project managers that uncovered year-2000 traps鈥 and fixed them. Quietly, without fanfare.聽 In many cases because admitting there was a problem would have resulted in a lawsuit by angry customers.聽But mostly because it was our job to fix those design flaws before anyone was inconvenienced or hurt. So, yeah鈥 all that Y2K hysteria was for nothing, because programmers worked their asses off to make sure it was for nothing. Bolding mine. Absolutely true. 聽My Mom worked like crazy all throughout 1998 and 1999 on dozens of systems to avoid Y2K crashes. Nothing major happened because people worked to made sure it didn鈥檛. Now if we could just harness that concept for some of the other major issues facing us today. 聽 this meme came so far since i saw it this morning. god i love tumblr teaching tumblr about history. As a young Sys Admin during Y2K, I can confirm that it was SRS BZNS. 聽I worked for a major pharmaceutical company at the time. 聽They spent millions of dollars on consultant and programmer hours, not to mention their own employees鈥 time, to fix all their in-house software as well as replace it with new systems. 聽Sys Admins like myself were continually deploying patches, updating firmware, and deploying new systems in the months leading up to Y2K. 聽Once that was done, though, the programmers went home and cashed their checks. When the FATEFUL HOUR came along, it wasn鈥檛 just one hour. 聽For a global company with offices in dozens of countries, it was 24 hours of being alert and on-call. 聽I imagine that other large organizations had similar setups with entire IT departments working in shifts to monitor everything. 聽Everyone was on a hair trigger, too, so the slightest problem caused ALL HANDS ON DECK pages to go out. Yes, we had pagers. For hard numbers IDC鈥檚 2006 calculation put the total US cost of remediation, before and after, at $147 billion聽- that鈥檚 in 1999 dollars. 聽That paid for an army of programmers, including calling up retired grandparents from the senior center because COBOL and FORTRAN apps from the聽鈥60s needed fixing. Also note that there were some problems, including $13 billion in remediation included in the figure above. 聽Some of these involved nuclear power plants, medical equipment, and 鈥渁 customer at a New York State video rental store had a bill for $91,250, the cost of renting the movie 鈥楾he General鈥檚 Daughter鈥 for 100 years.鈥 Y2K was anything but nothing. Reblogging because this is a side to the story I had never heard.
Relying: REMEMBER
 Turn your computer off
 before midnight orn
 12/31/99.
 BUY
tamashiihiroka:

forloveofreason:

shananaomi:

jaybushman:

spytap:

ralfmaximus:

faisdm:

the-most-calamitous:

jibini:

top-lotad-breeder:

chocogoat:

what. why? someone pls explain to me pls i wasnt born yet in 1999 why turn computer off before midnight? what happen if u dont?

y2k lol everyone was like 鈥渢he supervirus is gonna take over the world and ruin everything and end the world!!!鈥

This is the oldest I鈥檝e ever felt. Right now.

WHAT THE FUCK DO YOU MEAN YOU WEREN鈥橳 BORN YET IN 1999.

Ahh the Millenium bug.
It wasn鈥檛 a virus, it was an issue with how some old computers at the time were programmed to deal with dates. Basically some computers with older operating systems didn鈥檛 have anything in place to deal with the year reaching 99 and looping around to 00. It was believed that this inability to sync with the correct date would cause issues, and even crash entire systems the moment the date changed.
People flipped out about it, convinced that the date discrepancy between netwoked systems would bring down computers everywhere and shut down the internet and so all systems relying on computers, including plane navigation etc. would go down causing worldwide chaos. It was genuinely believed that people should all switch off computers to avoid this. One or two smart people spoke up and said 鈥渦m hey, this actually will only effect a few very outdated computers and they鈥檒l just display the wrong date, so it probably won鈥檛 be harmful鈥 but were largely ignored because people selling books about the end of the world were talking louder.
In the end, absolutely nothing happened.

Oh gosh.
I鈥檝e been a programmer working for various government agencies since the early 1990s and I can say with some confidence:
NOTHING HAPPENED BECAUSE WE WORKED VERY HARD FIXING SHIT THAT MOST DEFINITELY WOULD HAVE BROKEN ON 1-JAN-2000.
One example I personally worked on: vaccination databases.
My contract was with the CDC to coordinate immunization registries 鈥 you know, kids鈥 vaccine histories. What they got, when they got it, and (most importantly) which vaccines they were due to get next and when. These were state-wide registries, containing millions of records each.
Most of these systems were designed in the 1970s and 1980s, and stored the child鈥檚 DOB year as only two digits. This means that 鈥 had we not fixed it 鈥 just about every child in all the databases I worked on would have SUDDENLY AGED OUT OF THE PROGRAM 1-JAN-2000.
In other words: these kids would suddenly be 鈥渢oo old鈥 to receive critical vaccines.
Okay, so that鈥檚 not a nuke plant exploding or airplanes dropping from the sky. In fact, nothing obvious would have occurred come Jan 1st.
BUT
Without the software advising doctors when to give vaccinations, an entire generation鈥檚 immunity to things like measles, mumps, smallpox (etc) would have been compromised. And nobody would even know there was a problem for months 鈥 possibly years 鈥 after.
You think the fun & games caused by a few anti-vaxers is bad?
Imagine whole populations going unvaccinated by accident鈥 one case of measles and the death toll might be measured in millions.
This is one example I KNOW to be true, because I was there.
I also know that in the years leading up to 2000 there were ad-hoc discussion groups (particularly alt.risk) of amazed programmers and project managers that uncovered year-2000 traps鈥 and fixed them.
Quietly, without fanfare.聽
In many cases because admitting there was a problem would have resulted in a lawsuit by angry customers.聽But mostly because it was our job to fix those design flaws before anyone was inconvenienced or hurt.
So, yeah鈥 all that Y2K hysteria was for nothing, because programmers worked their asses off to make sure it was for nothing.

Bolding mine.

Absolutely true. 聽My Mom worked like crazy all throughout 1998 and 1999 on dozens of systems to avoid Y2K crashes. Nothing major happened because people worked to made sure it didn鈥檛.
Now if we could just harness that concept for some of the other major issues facing us today. 聽

this meme came so far since i saw it this morning. god i love tumblr teaching tumblr about history.

As a young Sys Admin during Y2K, I can confirm that it was SRS BZNS. 聽I worked for a major pharmaceutical company at the time. 聽They spent millions of dollars on consultant and programmer hours, not to mention their own employees鈥 time, to fix all their in-house software as well as replace it with new systems. 聽Sys Admins like myself were continually deploying patches, updating firmware, and deploying new systems in the months leading up to Y2K. 聽Once that was done, though, the programmers went home and cashed their checks.
When the FATEFUL HOUR came along, it wasn鈥檛 just one hour. 聽For a global company with offices in dozens of countries, it was 24 hours of being alert and on-call. 聽I imagine that other large organizations had similar setups with entire IT departments working in shifts to monitor everything. 聽Everyone was on a hair trigger, too, so the slightest problem caused ALL HANDS ON DECK pages to go out.
Yes, we had pagers.
For hard numbers IDC鈥檚 2006 calculation put the total US cost of remediation, before and after, at $147 billion聽- that鈥檚 in 1999 dollars. 聽That paid for an army of programmers, including calling up retired grandparents from the senior center because COBOL and FORTRAN apps from the聽鈥60s needed fixing.
Also note that there were some problems, including $13 billion in remediation included in the figure above. 聽Some of these involved nuclear power plants, medical equipment, and 鈥渁 customer at a New York State video rental store had a bill for $91,250, the cost of renting the movie 鈥楾he General鈥檚 Daughter鈥 for 100 years.鈥


Y2K was anything but nothing.

Reblogging because this is a side to the story I had never heard.

tamashiihiroka: forloveofreason: shananaomi: jaybushman: spytap: ralfmaximus: faisdm: the-most-calamitous: jibini: top-lotad-bre...