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Clothes, College, and Confused: Walmart Dress Code Freedom of Choice Walmart Associate Dress Code Color Guide You have a lot of freedom when dressing for work. Here's a range of the dress-code compliant colors Tops Lightest Darkest amkrii: akornzombie: siryouarebeingmocked: diarrheaworldstarhiphop: siryouarebeingmocked: friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt: thes3nator: counterclockworkminds: the-dao-of-the-zerg: left-reminders: “Freedom of choice” under capitalism Hey now, that looks like nearly 50% of a color! Half a color worth of freedom. You can’t get that with the competition, which requires you to wear exactly one shade. We give you five different shades! Innovation, that’s what this is. Raw, capitalistic innovation. Now you’ve got a full half a color worth of freedom. So, I worked for a big name department store. I was happy when I came in and they said I could pick my own outfits, I just had to stick to ‘dark colors’ (dark blue, red, black, etc) and look business professional. Oh and only ½ print at most (printed top). Coming from a call center (I went into retail to help pay for college) pretty much all of my current clothes were fine. It was great! I even could wear my red dress that everyone loved because it was ‘on brand’.A few months in I find out that the only reason I could wear color at all was because of a state supreme court decision that said forcing only one color counted as a uniform, and that if it was a uniform the company had to pay. So across the river my fellow associates could only wear black, but whatever ‘business professional’ clothes they wanted.What a liberal dress code! /s How come we haven’t seen any walmart employees wear dresscode compliant fursuits yet? wearing a different shade of blue fursuit each day of the work week is direct action. Is there any petty, inane thing that people like OP can’t blame on capitalism? Yes, OP would tooootallyyy love to go into a walmart in a hurry and be fucking confused as to who to ask for help cus every employee wears what ever the fuck they want I somehow got confused for an employee all the time even when my uniform didn’t match the joint I was in. Heck, I got mistaken the other day, when I waited around in a food store for someone in my Sunday best, even though all the employees were in t-shirts.Me, not the person. They must’ve thought I was security. Huh. I’ve been at my weekend job, in my work shirt (black polo with the company name embroidered on the sleeve, with name tag) and had people ask me “ do you work here? ” “No. I just cosplay as a Wal-mart employee because misery is my kink.”
Clothes, College, and Confused: Walmart Dress Code
 Freedom of Choice
 Walmart Associate Dress Code Color Guide
 You have a lot of freedom when dressing for work. Here's a range
 of the dress-code compliant colors
 Tops
 Lightest
 Darkest
amkrii:

akornzombie:

siryouarebeingmocked:

diarrheaworldstarhiphop:
siryouarebeingmocked:

friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt:

thes3nator:

counterclockworkminds:


the-dao-of-the-zerg:

left-reminders:
“Freedom of choice” under capitalism 
Hey now, that looks like nearly 50% of a color! Half a color worth of freedom. You can’t get that with the competition, which requires you to wear exactly one shade. We give you five different shades! Innovation, that’s what this is. Raw, capitalistic innovation. Now you’ve got a full half a color worth of freedom.

So, I worked for a big name department store. I was happy when I came in and they said I could pick my own outfits, I just had to stick to ‘dark colors’ (dark blue, red, black, etc) and look business professional. Oh and only ½ print at most (printed top). Coming from a call center (I went into retail to help pay for college) pretty much all of my current clothes were fine. It was great! I even could wear my red dress that everyone loved because it was ‘on brand’.A few months in I find out that the only reason I could wear color at all was because of a state supreme court decision that said forcing only one color counted as a uniform, and that if it was a uniform the company had to pay. So across the river my fellow associates could only wear black, but whatever ‘business professional’ clothes they wanted.What a liberal dress code! /s


How come we haven’t seen any walmart employees wear dresscode compliant fursuits yet?

wearing a different shade of blue fursuit each day of the work week is direct action.

Is there any petty, inane thing that people like OP can’t blame on capitalism?

Yes, OP would tooootallyyy love to go into a walmart in a hurry and be fucking confused as to who to ask for help cus every employee wears what ever the fuck they want

I somehow got confused for an employee all the time even when my uniform didn’t match the joint I was in. Heck, I got mistaken the other day, when I waited around in a food store for someone in my Sunday best, even though all the employees were in t-shirts.Me, not the person. They must’ve thought I was security.

Huh. I’ve been at my weekend job, in my work shirt (black polo with the company name embroidered on the sleeve, with name tag) and had people ask me “ do you work here? ”

“No. I just cosplay as a Wal-mart employee because misery is my kink.”

amkrii: akornzombie: siryouarebeingmocked: diarrheaworldstarhiphop: siryouarebeingmocked: friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt: thes3nator: ...

Being Alone, Ass, and Assassination: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p> </blockquote> <p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p> </blockquote> <p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p> <p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ using an outdated term for transgender people is “<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad “<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p> </blockquote> <p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p> <p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p> <p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p> <p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p> <p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p> </blockquote> <p>“ Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender “<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“ I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity “<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“ Diversity isn’t bad. “<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“ It’s not going to kill you “<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“ It’s not that hard a concept to understand. “<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote> <p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote> <p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>
Being Alone, Ass, and Assassination: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD
 FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU
 I )
 OPNTS
<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176509323667/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-atomicsalmon" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote><p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176489965878/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p><blockquote>
<p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176488525882/atomicsalmon-brett-caton-libertarirynn" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176487882003/brett-caton-libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://brett-caton.tumblr.com/post/176468087807/libertarirynn-on-july-31-1968-a-young-black" class="tumblr_blog">brett-caton</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://libertarirynn.tumblr.com/post/176420298534/on-july-31-1968-a-young-black-man-was-reading" class="tumblr_blog">libertarirynn</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p>

<p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong’s first appearance on the iconic comic strip “Peanuts.” Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p>

<p>Franklin was “born” after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p>

<p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p>

<p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, ‘I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.‘”</p>

<p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p>

<p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p>

<p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn’t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn’t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p>

<p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p>

<p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was “over at Vietnam.” At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p>

<p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin’s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p>

<p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p>

<p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic’s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz’ popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p>

<p>Schulz’ response: “I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin – he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”</p>

<p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p>

<p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p>

<p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p>

<p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were “concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people … And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit … Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them … and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.”</p>

<p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Of course, nowadays one of the characters would suddenly be black, another would be transexual, and all the girls would be quasi lesbians at least. :P</p>
</blockquote>

<p>Diversity isn’t bad, but using an outdated term for transgender people is. </p>
<p>Please do NOT use transsexual. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>“
using an outdated term for transgender people is

“<br/><br/>Who appointed you to the language police?<br/><br/>Trans <b>gender</b> doesn’t make sense, since gender is the psychological depiction of biological sex. A transsexual is someone whose brain doesn’t align with the body. They experience gender dysphoria, they don’t flip genders because it’s Thursday.<br/><br/>“
Diversity isn’t bad

“<br/><br/>Bullshit. <i>Diversity </i>as it is used now is the opposite of what it used to <i>be</i>. Every story has to be the <b>same </b>because <i>diversity?</i> That’s some Animal Farm levels of crap. <br/><br/><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrlzSqLSGj8GIOeT5jrQsJA/videos</a><br/><br/></p>
</blockquote>

<p>1. Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender, regardless of whether or not it makes sense.</p>
<p>2. Kek, I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity, you’re just pulling shit out of your ass.</p>
<p>Diversity isn’t bad. It’s not going to kill you if there’s a story featuring someone that is gay, trans, disabled, of color, or anything else outside of what people usually choose to depict.</p>
<p>It’s not that hard a concept to understand. If you get heated over there being diversity then you need to check yourself and your beliefs.</p>
<p>Forced diversity is understandable to dislike, but I wasn’t even talking about that in the first place. I said a general statement. </p>
</blockquote>
<p>“
Trans people themselves would rather people use transgender

“<br/><br/>And your proof is.. your opinion. Dismissed as easily. I’ve known transsexuals all my life, they used the word, that is where i heard it, I don’t care that your little group of 0.0001% of the english speakers want to control how english is spoken, any more than I care how scientologists want it to be spoken.<br/><br/>Authoritarians try to control minds by controlling words. It’s very revealing to read books like 1984. SocJus fits in perfectly to that world.<br/><br/>“
I never said every story has to be the same because of diversity

“<br/><br/>And I never said you did. God, strawmannery already? I said ‘diversity’ makes every story the same. You have to have the trans, you have to have the black person, the gay, blah blah blah. Art has to serve the needs of the ideology, not the audience, in the SocJus worldview.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/4d0465e9b6c0eee84fa8ff9bf3e14229/tumblr_inline_pcrreh11Tt1qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="1078" data-orig-width="881"/></figure><p><a href="http://brettcaton.blogspot.com/2018/04/has-squirrel-girl-acquired-downs.html">Which results in… that.</a><br/><br/>“
Diversity isn’t bad.

“<br/><br/>By that same logic, having every story push communism or fascism isn’t bad. I disagree.<br/><br/>“
 It’s not going to kill you

“<br/><br/>Bullshit. But even by that same bar, neither is pushing stories that talk about pushing transsexuals into gas chambers. Is that really the standard of morality you ascribe to? Something is acceptable if it won’t kill<i> you?</i><br/><br/>“
It’s not that hard a concept to understand. 

“<br/><br/>I understand it perfectly, just as I understand the claims of all sorts of religions and ideologies.<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/ec0315ffbc32535d8b176e33bc0a4599/tumblr_inline_pcrrlfOi931qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="546" data-orig-width="728"/></figure><p>There is something you - along with so many other fanatics do not comprehend. There are people who do not believe the same things you do, despite understanding your arguments. You cannot comprehend the idea that you may be…<br/><br/><br/></p><figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"><img src="https://78.media.tumblr.com/287067269a75c067af2f0325ca17e5e7/tumblr_inline_pcrrnh1mG01qj6ut1_540.jpg" data-orig-height="2592" data-orig-width="3888"/></figure></blockquote>

<p>Lol have you ever tried to chill? You should try it sometime, you look like you’re desperate for it. </p></blockquote>

<p>Why in the hell did a post about Peanuts turn into this shitshow?</p>

<p><a href="https://atomicsalmon.tumblr.com/post/176535484178/brett-caton-atomicsalmon-brett-caton" class="tumblr_blog">atomicsalmon</a>:</p...

Fire, Future, and Guns: NY AG Underwood @NewYorkStateAG To be clear, it was the Trump ad- min that decided to give criminals the tools to build untraceable, undetectable 3-D printed guns at the touch of a button That's why we sued. on.ny.gov 2LznSLv Donald J. Trump @realDonaldTrump I am looking into 3-D Plastic Guns being sold to the public. Already spoke to NRA, doesn't seem to make much sense! <p><a href="http://amalgamasreal.tumblr.com/post/176527642745/friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt-kasaron" class="tumblr_blog">amalgamasreal</a>:</p><blockquote> <p><a href="https://friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt.tumblr.com/post/176491719675/kasaron-1r3l4nd13-kasaron-1r3l4nd13" class="tumblr_blog">friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://kasaron.tumblr.com/post/176491236610/1r3l4nd13-kasaron-1r3l4nd13-kasaron" class="tumblr_blog">kasaron</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://1r3l4nd13.tumblr.com/post/176486816978/kasaron-1r3l4nd13-kasaron" class="tumblr_blog">1r3l4nd13</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://kasaron.tumblr.com/post/176486495640/1r3l4nd13-kasaron-liberalsarecool-another" class="tumblr_blog">kasaron</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="https://1r3l4nd13.tumblr.com/post/176486223328/kasaron-liberalsarecool-another-trump-policy" class="tumblr_blog">1r3l4nd13</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://kasaron.tumblr.com/post/176486019980/liberalsarecool-another-trump-policy-creating" class="tumblr_blog">kasaron</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><a href="http://liberalsarecool.com/post/176483209782/another-trump-policy-creating-the-worst-outcome" class="tumblr_blog">liberalsarecool</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Another <b>Trump</b> policy creating the worst outcome. #3DPrintedGuns</p> <p>Trump saying ‘it doesn’t make much sense’ should be his campaign slogan.</p> <p>The abdication to the NRA is GOP law.</p> </blockquote> <p>The tools to build 3D printed guns have existed since at least the Obama Administration.</p> <p style=""><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberator_(gun)">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberator_(gun)</a><br/></p> <p style="">The gun was designed in 2013. </p> <p>The issue was not the existence of the gun itself, but the fact that if the Liberator (and other 3D printed gun files) were “weapons of war” that would possibly violate ITAR.</p> <p>That adjudication resulted in the government (and ITAR specifically) being sued by Cody Wilson. The government settled out of court and openly admitted their wrongdoing as part of the settlement. </p> <p>I will repeat; the 3D printing and manufacture of firearms was <i>never</i> illegal in the US, only the international distribution of the files themselves. Even the distribution of the files within US borders and possession of the files themselves are all and were all legal. </p> </blockquote> <p>I have no issues with people owning guns legally but I don’t think I’m ok with them being able to print a gun. </p> </blockquote> <p style="">Would you be willing to explain why?</p> </blockquote> <p>See, my reasons only make sense to me and the environment I grew up in but I don’t see a reason for an individual to be able to make a gun whenever they want. I know most probably won’t do anything illegal with the gun but I also think the gun might not be safe to use…I have never used a 3D gun or know much about them so they could be perfectly safe to use. </p> </blockquote> <p>Generally, polymer is a less than stellar material to make a gun out of; that’s why the Liberator is basically a single-shot low-power gun. It’s a proof of concept to show it Can Be Done and thereby challenge the idea of controlling ownership of firearms as a whole.</p> <p>Since it has been adjudicated that code (and files) are themselves a form of speech; sharing that “speech” in an open forum is, by default, legal and protected.</p> <p>The issue is, people (for a variety of reasons) already DO make untracable firearms, from 80% lowers, from raw stock, from scrap metal, etc. They’re rarely if ever used in criminal activities, mostly because criminals can just buy an illegal (but legitimately manufactured) firearm either which were illegally purchased themselves, stolen, or gotten thanks to programs like ATFs Fast and Furious and other gunwalking schemes.</p> </blockquote> <p>as for fears about criminals building untraceable guns, they can almost certainly do it better for cheaper with scrap metal &amp; metal working shop tools. 3d printers arent cheap &amp; polymer guns dont last, as <a class="tumblelog" href="https://tmblr.co/miMjDZnDWnZqZODmSVuibaw">@kasaron</a> has already noted. assuming that they dont just buy black market factory made guns, which are much better quality for much less effort.</p> <p>&amp; some people have this ridiculously idea that a polymer gun is totally undetectable by security scanners &amp; can be taken ANYWHERE. yeah, they arent, &amp; they still require metal bullets.</p> </blockquote> <p>Anyone who’s worried about 3d printed guns has <b>NEVER </b>actually had or used a 3d printer. I’ve got 5 of them, ranging from $300 chinese DIY kits to $4500 “prosumer” fully assembled devices, and not a single one can make a gun that I’d be willing to fire with any form of reliability or safety. The tolerances and durability just aren’t there. </p> <p>The best I could make would be that Liberator up there and the chances that it might just explode in my hand on the first shot aren’t low. </p> <p>The people who’ve made the fully functional AR lowers aren’t doing it using a 3D printer you can just buy off the shelf, they’d using industrial grade SLA resin printers that <b>START</b> in the 5 figures and if you want the metal additive printers you’re not walking away without spending 6 figures. At that price point they can just buy metal working equipment and make real metal guns by the dozen in the time it would take to print a single gun. </p> <p>Now: I can’t speak for the future, 3d printers might change, but the direction they’re moving in now does not lend to making guns in the least bit; and stifling the entire branch of technology out of idiotic fear of a possibility is the last thing we need to do.</p> <p>Also: THERE’S ALREADY OVER 300 MILLION GUNS IN THE US AND IT WOULD BE WAY EASIER AND CHEAPER TO JUST BUY/STEAL ONE OF THOSE THAN PRINT ONE. </p> </blockquote> <p>This is what I’m saying. The school I work at has a 3-D printer and by no means would it be capable of making a gun you would want to use. Not only would trying to prevent the program from being downloaded be an enormous waste of time, most criminals wouldn’t even be bothered with it when there are much easier ways to get a gun.</p>
Fire, Future, and Guns: NY AG Underwood
 @NewYorkStateAG
 To be clear, it was the Trump ad-
 min that decided to give criminals
 the tools to build untraceable,
 undetectable 3-D printed guns at
 the touch of a button
 That's why we sued. on.ny.gov
 2LznSLv
 Donald J. Trump @realDonaldTrump
 I am looking into 3-D Plastic Guns being sold to
 the public. Already spoke to NRA, doesn't seem
 to make much sense!
<p><a href="http://amalgamasreal.tumblr.com/post/176527642745/friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt-kasaron" class="tumblr_blog">amalgamasreal</a>:</p><blockquote>
<p><a href="https://friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt.tumblr.com/post/176491719675/kasaron-1r3l4nd13-kasaron-1r3l4nd13" class="tumblr_blog">friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://kasaron.tumblr.com/post/176491236610/1r3l4nd13-kasaron-1r3l4nd13-kasaron" class="tumblr_blog">kasaron</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://1r3l4nd13.tumblr.com/post/176486816978/kasaron-1r3l4nd13-kasaron" class="tumblr_blog">1r3l4nd13</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://kasaron.tumblr.com/post/176486495640/1r3l4nd13-kasaron-liberalsarecool-another" class="tumblr_blog">kasaron</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="https://1r3l4nd13.tumblr.com/post/176486223328/kasaron-liberalsarecool-another-trump-policy" class="tumblr_blog">1r3l4nd13</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://kasaron.tumblr.com/post/176486019980/liberalsarecool-another-trump-policy-creating" class="tumblr_blog">kasaron</a>:</p>

<blockquote>
<p><a href="http://liberalsarecool.com/post/176483209782/another-trump-policy-creating-the-worst-outcome" class="tumblr_blog">liberalsarecool</a>:</p>
<blockquote>
<p>Another <b>Trump</b> policy creating the worst outcome. #3DPrintedGuns</p>

<p>Trump saying ‘it doesn’t make much sense’ should be his campaign slogan.</p>

<p>The abdication to the NRA is GOP law.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>The tools to build 3D printed guns have existed since at least the Obama Administration.</p>
<p style=""><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberator_(gun)">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberator_(gun)</a><br/></p>
<p style="">The gun was designed in 2013. </p>
<p>The issue was not the existence of the gun itself, but the fact that if the Liberator (and other 3D printed gun files) were “weapons of war” that would possibly violate ITAR.</p>
<p>That adjudication resulted in the government (and ITAR specifically) being sued by Cody Wilson. The government settled out of court and openly admitted their wrongdoing as part of the settlement. </p>
<p>I will repeat; the 3D printing and manufacture of firearms was <i>never</i> illegal in the US, only the international distribution of the files themselves. Even the distribution of the files within US borders and possession of the files themselves are all and were all legal. </p>
</blockquote>

<p>I have no issues with people owning guns legally but I don’t think I’m ok with them being able to print a gun. </p>
</blockquote>
<p style="">Would you be willing to explain why?</p>
</blockquote>

<p>See, my reasons only make sense to me and the environment I grew up in but I don’t see a reason for an individual to be able to make a gun whenever they want. I know most probably won’t do anything illegal with the gun but I also think the gun might not be safe to use…I have never used a 3D gun or know much about them so they could be perfectly safe to use. </p>
</blockquote>

<p>Generally, polymer is a less than stellar material to make a gun out of; that’s why the Liberator is basically a single-shot low-power gun. It’s a proof of concept to show it Can Be Done and thereby challenge the idea of controlling ownership of firearms as a whole.</p>
<p>Since it has been adjudicated that code (and files) are themselves a form of speech; sharing that “speech” in an open forum is, by default, legal and protected.</p>
<p>The issue is, people (for a variety of reasons) already DO make untracable firearms, from 80% lowers, from raw stock, from scrap metal, etc. They’re rarely if ever used in criminal activities, mostly because criminals can just buy an illegal (but legitimately manufactured) firearm either which were illegally purchased themselves, stolen, or gotten thanks to programs like ATFs Fast and Furious and other gunwalking schemes.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>as for fears about criminals building untraceable guns, they can almost certainly do it better for cheaper with scrap metal &amp; metal working shop tools. 3d printers arent cheap &amp; polymer guns dont last, as <a class="tumblelog" href="https://tmblr.co/miMjDZnDWnZqZODmSVuibaw">@kasaron</a> has already noted. assuming that they dont just buy black market factory made guns, which are much better quality for much less effort.</p>
<p>&amp; some people have this ridiculously idea that a polymer gun is totally undetectable by security scanners &amp; can be taken ANYWHERE. yeah, they arent, &amp; they still require metal bullets.</p>
</blockquote>
<p>Anyone who’s worried about 3d printed guns has <b>NEVER </b>actually had or used a 3d printer. I’ve got 5 of them, ranging from $300 chinese DIY kits to $4500 “prosumer” fully assembled devices, and not a single one can make a gun that I’d be willing to fire with any form of reliability or safety. The tolerances and durability just aren’t there. </p>
<p>The best I could make would be that Liberator up there and the chances that it might just explode in my hand on the first shot aren’t low. </p>
<p>The people who’ve made the fully functional AR lowers aren’t doing it using a 3D printer you can just buy off the shelf, they’d using industrial grade SLA resin printers that <b>START</b> in the 5 figures and if you want the metal additive printers you’re not walking away without spending 6 figures. At that price point they can just buy metal working equipment and make real metal guns by the dozen in the time it would take to print a single gun. </p>
<p>Now: I can’t speak for the future, 3d printers might change, but the direction they’re moving in now does not lend to making guns in the least bit; and stifling the entire branch of technology out of idiotic fear of a possibility is the last thing we need to do.</p>
<p>Also: THERE’S ALREADY OVER 300 MILLION GUNS IN THE US AND IT WOULD BE WAY EASIER AND CHEAPER TO JUST BUY/STEAL ONE OF THOSE THAN PRINT ONE. </p>
</blockquote>

<p>This is what I’m saying. The school I work at has a 3-D printer and by no means would it be capable of making a gun you would want to use. Not only would trying to prevent the program from being downloaded be an enormous waste of time, most criminals wouldn’t even be bothered with it when there are much easier ways to get a gun.</p>

<p><a href="http://amalgamasreal.tumblr.com/post/176527642745/friendly-neighborhood-ehrhardt-kasaron" class="tumblr_blog">amalgamasreal</a>:...

Being Alone, Assassination, and Baseball: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU I ) OPNTS <p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p> <p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p> <p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p> <p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p> <p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p> <p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p> <p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p> <p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p> <p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p> <p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p> <p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p> <p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p> <p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p> <p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p> <p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p> <p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p> <p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p> <p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p> <p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>
Being Alone, Assassination, and Baseball: HI... I'M I'M VERY GLAD
 FRANKLIN.. TO KNOW yOU
 I )
 OPNTS
<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his eyes, he started running and screaming throughout the house, calling for his mom. He would show his mom, and, she would gasp, seeing something she thought she would never see in her lifetime. Throughout the nation, there were similar reactions.</p>

<p>What they saw was Franklin Armstrong&rsquo;s first appearance on the iconic comic strip &ldquo;Peanuts.&rdquo; Franklin would be 50 years old this year.</p>

<p>Franklin was &ldquo;born&rdquo; after a school teacher, Harriet Glickman, had written a letter to creator Charles M. Schulz after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death outside his Memphis hotel room. </p>

<p>Glickman, who had kids of her own and having worked with kids, was especially aware of the power of comics among the young. “And my feeling at the time was that I realized that black kids and white kids never saw themselves [depicted] together in the classroom,” she would say. </p>

<p>She would write, “Since the death of Martin Luther King, &lsquo;I’ve been asking myself what I can do to help change those conditions in our society which led to the assassination and which contribute to the vast sea of misunderstanding, hate, fear and violence.'”</p>

<p>Glickman asked Schulz if he could consider adding a black character to his popular comic strip, which she hoped would bring the country together and show people of color that they are not excluded from American society. </p>

<p>She had written to others as well, but the others feared it was too soon, that it may be costly to their careers, that the syndicate would drop them if they dared do something like that.</p>

<p>Charles Schulz did not have to respond to her letter, he could have just completely ignored it, and everyone would have forgotten about it. But, Schulz did take the time to respond, saying he was intrigued with the idea, but wasn&rsquo;t sure whether it would be right, coming from him, he didn&rsquo;t want to make matters worse, he felt that it may sound condescending to people of color.</p>

<p>Glickman did not give up, and continued communicating with Schulz, with Schulz surprisingly responding each time. She would even have black friends write to Schulz and explain to him what it would mean to them and gave him some suggestions on how to introduce such a character without offending anyone. This conversation would continue until one day, Schulz would tell Glickman to check her newspaper on July 31, 1968.</p>

<p>On that date, the cartoon, as created by Schulz, shows Charlie Brown meeting a new character, named Franklin. Other than his color, Franklin was just an ordinary kid who befriends and helps Charlie Brown. Franklin also mentions that his father was &ldquo;over at Vietnam.&rdquo; At the end of the series, which lasted three strips, Charlie invites Franklin to spend the night one day so they can continue their friendship.</p>

<p>There was no big announcement, there was no big deal, it was just a natural conversation between two kids, whose obvious differences did not matter to them. And, the fact that Franklin&rsquo;s father was fighting for this country was also a very strong statement by Schulz.</p>

<p>Although Schulz never made a big deal over the inclusion of Franklin, there were many fans, especially in the South, who were very upset by it and that made national news. One Southern editor even said, “I don’t mind you having a black character, but please don’t show them in school together.”</p>

<p>It would eventually lead to a conversation between Schulz and the president of the comic&rsquo;s distribution company, who was concerned about the introduction of Franklin and how it might affect Schulz&rsquo; popularity. Many newspapers during that time had threatened to cut the strip.</p>

<p>Schulz&rsquo; response: &ldquo;I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin &ndash; he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, &quot;Well, Larry, let&rsquo;s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How&rsquo;s that?&rdquo;</p>

<p>Eventually, Franklin became a regular character in the comic strips, and, despite complaints, Franklin would be shown sitting in front of Peppermint Patty at school and playing center field on her baseball team. </p>

<p>More recently, Franklin is brought up on social media around Thanksgiving time, when the animated 1973 special &ldquo;A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving&rdquo; appears. Some people have blamed Schulz for showing Franklin sitting alone on the Thanksgiving table, while the other characters sit across him. But, Schulz did not have the same control over the animated cartoon on a television network that he did on his own comic strip in the newspapers.</p>

<p>But, he did have control over his own comic strip, and, he courageously decided to make a statement because of one brave school teacher who decided to ask a simple question.</p>

<p>Glickman would explain later that her parents were &ldquo;concerned about others, and the values that they instilled in us about caring for and appreciating everyone of all colors and backgrounds — this is what we knew when we were growing up, that you cared about other people &hellip; And so, during the years, we were very aware of the issues of racism and civil rights in this country [when] black people had to sit at the back of the bus, black people couldn’t sit in the same seats in the restaurants that you could sit &hellip; Every day I would see, or read, about black children trying to get into school and seeing crowds of white people standing around spitting at them or yelling at them &hellip; and the beatings and the dogs and the hosings and the courage of so many people in that time.&rdquo;</p>

<p>Because of Glickman, because of Schulz, people around the world were introduced to a little boy named Franklin.” (Source: The Jon S. Randal Peace Page, Facebook)</p>

<p>“On July 31, 1968, a young, black man was reading the newspaper when he saw something that he had never seen before. With tears in his ey...