Produces
Produces

Produces

It Comes
It Comes

It Comes

Enjoy It
Enjoy It

Enjoy It

I Was
I Was

I Was

Are
Are

Are

With
With

With

Was
Was

Was

Im The Worst
Im The Worst

Im The Worst

Twice
Twice

Twice

Pee My Pants
Pee My Pants

Pee My Pants

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Pairs: It Pairs Well with Oakleys
Pairs: It Pairs Well with Oakleys

It Pairs Well with Oakleys

Pairs: It Pairs Well with Oakleys by jcpearce MORE MEMES
Pairs: It Pairs Well with Oakleys by jcpearce
MORE MEMES

It Pairs Well with Oakleys by jcpearce MORE MEMES

Pairs: goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeadofflandersfields: Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window. @birdblogwhichisforbirds @snitling EXACTLY This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes. This is a work of beautiful defiance. Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery. The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it! From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them.  Reblogging for this beautiful addition. [ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]
Pairs: goosegoblin:
theramseyloft:

jurassicjenday:


theramseyloft:

tinysaurus-rex:


iwilltrytobereasonable:

cant-hug-every-human:

thedeadofflandersfields:
Pigeon steals poppies from the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia in order to build a nest beside a stained glass window.
@birdblogwhichisforbirds


@snitling EXACTLY


This is two pigeons, pigeons nest in bonded pairs (notice the first one is checked and its mate on the nest is barred). Usually they don’t make nests nearly so big but I guess if you have the materials, go for it. 


The nest is so unusually big because the vast majority is a platform to keep the actual nest (just that tiny ring in the corner around the bird sitting in it) cushioned from the anti bird spikes.
This is a work of beautiful defiance.
Using the very thing installed to make just a moment’s rest impossible as structural supports for an immovably stable nursery.

The symbolism achieved by these pigeons is better than some writers can hope for and I love it!
From the nest on the bird repellent spikes to the fact that those spikes are along the stained glass windows of a church, a place associated with sanctuary and compassion. The fact that the nest is made of stolen poppies for remembrance day hits the hardest though. Of the 54 animals to be awarded the Dickin Medal for acts of gallantry during WW2, 32 of them were pigeons. These were messengers who flew through battlefields and across borders, many of whom were killed or severely injured by enemy forces including gunfire and trained falcons. Many of their achievements saved the lives of hundreds of soldiers, and yet now their descendants are faces with anti-bird spikes, shooting and poisoning in an attempt to rid the cities from the rats with wings. I love this picture because it feels like they’re taking back just a little bit of that credit owed to them. 


Reblogging for this beautiful addition.

[ID: three colour photographs. The first shows a pigeon holding a fake poppy in its teeth, standing on a marble surface. The second shows a nest made of hundreds of fake poppies, cushioning a sitting pigeon from the anti-bird spikes below. The final photo is a zoomed-out picture of the nest, showing many stained glass windows surrounding it.]

goosegoblin: theramseyloft: jurassicjenday: theramseyloft: tinysaurus-rex: iwilltrytobereasonable: cant-hug-every-human: thedeado...

Pairs: cigardoesart:miraculous ladybug/spiderman crossover!! both pairs REALLY remind me of eachother !!
Pairs: cigardoesart:miraculous ladybug/spiderman crossover!! both pairs REALLY remind me of eachother !!

cigardoesart:miraculous ladybug/spiderman crossover!! both pairs REALLY remind me of eachother !!

Pairs: I HAVE TINY CRUSTACEANS STUCK IN MY GILLS! I'M HUNGRY FOR SEA BUGS! WHITETIP SHARK CLEANER WRASSE I NEED SOMEONE TO CARRY MY POLLEN TO OTHER FLOWERS I NEED NECTAR TO EAT! TICKSEED FLOWERS BUCKEYE BUTTERFLY l'M LOOKING FOR A BIG MEAL, BUT I NEED HELP FINDING A DEER I WANT TO EAT VENISON, BUT I'M TOO SMALL TO HUNT DEER! COMMON RAVEN COYOTE I NEED SOMEONE TO KEEP ANTS FROM EATING MY EGGS! I WANT A HOME WITH A BODYGUARD AND FREE ANT DELIVERY INCLUDED! COLOMBIAN LESSERBLACK TARANTULA DOTTED HUMMING FROG M. TILLERY - CYANEUS.COM /w/Av[ paramud: personal-scientist: draconym: themaishi: draconym: Mutualistic pairs for an “Odd Couples” Valentine’s program at my work. (Why do so many of my big work projects revolve around Valentine’s programs?) Also, by “sea bugs,” I obviously meant “gnathiid isopod larvae.” The himan one is not as good as the rest If you mean the mutualism between humans and honeyguides, I respectfully disagree. Human/honeyguide mutualism is one of the most sophisticated interspecies relationships in the animal kingdom. While humans have domesticated many other animals for their labor, the honeyguide remains entirely wild while electing to partner up with humans. Both humans and honeyguides have each developed specific calls to signal to one another that they are on the hunt, and these calls greatly increase the likelihood of success. According to this paper: The production of this sound increased the probability of being guided by a honeyguide from about 33 to 66% and the overall probability of thus finding a bees’ nest from 17 to 54%, as compared with other animal or human sounds of similar amplitude. That’s fucking bonkers, you guys!!! There are people out there who over the course of human history have created a sound to communicate with birds, and the birds themselves have a Human Call they use to communicate with us. There is no other wild animal you can just make noises at and immediately communicate that you want it to come help you!!! What’s more, many scientists consider this relationship more exploitative on the honeyguide’s end than on our end! That’s unprecedented!! These birds have essentially negotiated a trade deal with humanity!!!! This is the stuff of fantasy movies, except it’s real. Here’s an article from The Guardian about the broader implications of this kind of relationship with wild animals. It’s a good read: Apart from with our gut bacteria, we humans don’t really have any mutualistic relationships with other creatures. There is no special tune that we can sing to magically attract nearby hedgehogs into our gardens to feast on slugs. There will never be a special wink that fishermen can offer otters, encouraging them to catch fish that we might then de-bone for them, in return for some of the catch. The world is poorer for this. OKAY BUT the noise we make at honeyguides is one of my favorite noises there is, and if y’all haven’t heard the “BRRR-HM?” call that hunters use to summon honeyguides you are SERIOUSLY missing out. There’s an audio clip on the Audobon Society’s article about them [link] @metalpaca
Pairs: I HAVE TINY CRUSTACEANS
 STUCK IN MY GILLS!
 I'M HUNGRY FOR SEA BUGS!
 WHITETIP SHARK
 CLEANER WRASSE
 I NEED SOMEONE TO CARRY
 MY POLLEN TO OTHER FLOWERS
 I NEED NECTAR TO EAT!
 TICKSEED FLOWERS
 BUCKEYE BUTTERFLY
 l'M LOOKING FOR A BIG MEAL,
 BUT I NEED HELP FINDING A DEER
 I WANT TO EAT VENISON, BUT
 I'M TOO SMALL TO HUNT DEER!
 COMMON RAVEN
 COYOTE
 I NEED SOMEONE TO KEEP
 ANTS FROM EATING MY EGGS!
 I WANT A HOME WITH A BODYGUARD
 AND FREE ANT DELIVERY INCLUDED!
 COLOMBIAN LESSERBLACK TARANTULA
 DOTTED HUMMING FROG
 M. TILLERY - CYANEUS.COM
 /w/Av[
paramud:

personal-scientist:
draconym:

themaishi:

draconym:

Mutualistic pairs for an “Odd Couples” Valentine’s program at my work. (Why do so many of my big work projects revolve around Valentine’s programs?)
Also, by “sea bugs,” I obviously meant “gnathiid isopod larvae.”


The himan one is not as good as the rest 

If you mean the mutualism between humans and honeyguides, I respectfully disagree. Human/honeyguide mutualism is one of the most sophisticated interspecies relationships in the animal kingdom.
While humans have domesticated many other animals for their labor, the honeyguide remains entirely wild while electing to partner up with humans. Both humans and honeyguides have each developed specific calls to signal to one another that they are on the hunt, and these calls greatly increase the likelihood of success. According to this paper:
The production of this sound increased the probability of being guided 
by a honeyguide from about 33 to 66% and the overall probability of thus
 finding a bees’ nest from 17 to 54%, as compared with other animal or 
human sounds of similar amplitude.
That’s fucking bonkers, you guys!!! There are people out there who over the course of human history have created a sound to communicate with birds, and the birds themselves have a Human Call they use to communicate with us. There is no other wild animal you can just make noises at and immediately communicate that you want it to come help you!!!
What’s more, many scientists consider this relationship more exploitative on the honeyguide’s end than on our end! That’s unprecedented!! These birds have essentially negotiated a trade deal with humanity!!!! This is the stuff of fantasy movies, except it’s real.
Here’s an article from The Guardian about the broader implications of this kind of relationship with wild animals. It’s a good read:

Apart from with our gut bacteria, we humans don’t really have any 
mutualistic relationships with other creatures. There is no special tune
 that we can sing to magically attract nearby hedgehogs into our gardens
 to feast on slugs. There will never be a special wink that fishermen 
can offer otters, encouraging them to catch fish that we might then 
de-bone for them, in return for some of the catch. The world is poorer 
for this.



OKAY BUT the noise we make at honeyguides is one of my favorite noises there is, and if y’all haven’t heard the “BRRR-HM?” call that hunters use to summon honeyguides you are SERIOUSLY missing out. 
There’s an audio clip on the Audobon Society’s article about them [link]


@metalpaca

paramud: personal-scientist: draconym: themaishi: draconym: Mutualistic pairs for an “Odd Couples” Valentine’s program at my work. (W...

Pairs: ASKERART jasker: jasper and pearl in a couple of my favorite pairs of socks *♡* ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️
Pairs: ASKERART
jasker:

jasper and pearl in a couple of my favorite pairs of socks *♡*

❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

jasker: jasper and pearl in a couple of my favorite pairs of socks *♡* ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

Pairs: (Ja)ded @thefathippy 20h maooo000 Judy Harris Yesterday at 5:04 PM. 0+ Why the zoo charge us to look at animals they stole? this ain't even yall shit Sharon @MySharona1987 Replying to @thefathippy To be fair, they are doing a lot to help pandas screw. 4:56 AM- 11 Jul 2018 mysharona1987: little-butch-crouton: severelynerdysheep: somehavegonemissing: spookyboyfelix: princess-nakamoto: mysharona1987: No, seriously: I do think zoos do a *lot* of good. Much of the time. It’s not necessarily a Seaworld situation. Yeah a lot of animals don’t even have habitats anymore anyway. So zoos are just giving them a home. Even if people come to see them nearly everyday, its better then being kicked out of their habitat eventually by man. The funds from zoos are often used to feed the animals anyway (most zoos are non profit they cant use that money for people) if you pay to go to the zoo you are paying to keep those animals alive Zoos also educate people about animals, allowing for people to fall in love with the weird and wonderful. They help promote habitat preservation and putting a stop to poaching. Please don’t dismiss zoos, they’re not the same places as they used to be in the 1800s, or even the mid 1900s. So while Zoos are absolutely miles better than they were historical, there are still many serious issues. In terms of education, while I totally get why most people believe that zoos teach people (children especially) about how to protect animals and their habitats and are great places of education, this is not actually the case. In reality viewing captive animals in zoos only teaches people how animals react to boredom, depression, and stress in captive situations. The most effective methods of education in zoos come via presenting videos, documentaries, interactive modules, graphic displays, and computer simulations. which all show animals in their natural environments and do not require any animals to actually be kept in zoos. In terms of the work Zoos to in regards to species conservation and habitat preservation, zoos really are not effective, especially compared to other conservation and preservation work. While there are zoos that do good conservation work, most of the significant conservation work is not from zoos but other organizations that work with wildlife and natural habitats. Most animals in captivity are not even classified as endangered, with the priority of Zoos being in getting hold of animals popular with visitors, rather than those who face extinction. When it comes to breeding programs (and breeding animals in captivity aren’t the best way to help in conservation)   zoos do spend plenty of money on these programs however half of the animals being bred by Zoos are not classed as endangered in the wild and 25% are not threatened species but ones popular with visitors. It’s also actually massively more expensive to keep animals captive in zoos than to protect equivalent numbers of them in the wild! When it comes to the research, few Zoos actually support meaningful scientific research (with fewer employing scientists with full-time research jobs) and of those that do employ scientists its common for these scientists to study free-living animals rather than those within the zoo. Due to the nature of any research that does take place in zoos, the results of this research also generates little information about how to best conserve species in the wild as studies of captive animals have limited benefits to animals in the wild and animals brought up in captivity are less likely to survive in the wild if reintroduced as they often don’t have the natural behaviors needed for survival in the wild. More effective methods of habitat preservation and species conservations would be a multipronged approach tackling habitat loss and climate change, investing in conservation programs in the wild, education, working with local communities, seriously addressing poaching etc. and also to move away from the Zoo model towards more ethical and effective models of species conservation.  Just a few of the other ethical issues with Zoos include surplus animals, who, when grow older, and are less attractive to patrons, will often be sold or killed. Animals who breed frequently also are sometimes sold to game farms and ranches where hunters pay to kill them and other surplus animals are sometimes sold to roadside zoos,, private individuals, animal dealers, or to laboratories for experimentation purposes. The animals not sold often end up being fed to other zoo animals. In terms of the health of these captive animals, many develop health conditions and mental health problems such as Zoochosis. Of course, a major problem with zoos as well is that the animals who live there are kept in enclosures that don’t allow them to live their lives in a natural way and don’t compare with the natural habitat the animals were meant to be in. Zoo animals have to spend day after day, week after week, year after year in the exact same enclosure. This makes their lives very monotonous. Take elephants, for example, elephants in the wild, are used to traveling many miles a day in herds of about ten related adults and their offspring but in zoos are usually kept in pairs or even isolated in incredibly small enclosures compared to what they are used to in the wild. Elephants kept in zoos often show many signs of being mental distress and the average lifespan of elephants in zoos is around 16-18 years, instead of the 50-70 years they can live in the wild. I’m just going to copy paste your response when people ask me what I’m going to school for. I’m very pro zoo and I want animals in their natural habitat just as much. This is genuinely quite an interesting discussion.
Pairs: (Ja)ded @thefathippy 20h
 maooo000
 Judy Harris
 Yesterday at 5:04 PM.
 0+
 Why the zoo charge us to
 look at animals they stole?
 this ain't even yall shit
 Sharon
 @MySharona1987
 Replying to @thefathippy
 To be fair, they are doing a lot to help pandas
 screw.
 4:56 AM- 11 Jul 2018
mysharona1987:

little-butch-crouton:
severelynerdysheep:

somehavegonemissing:

spookyboyfelix:

princess-nakamoto:


mysharona1987:


No, seriously: I do think zoos do a *lot* of good. Much of the time.
It’s not necessarily a Seaworld situation.


Yeah a lot of animals don’t even have habitats anymore anyway. So zoos are just giving them a home. Even if people come to see them nearly everyday, its better then being kicked out of their habitat eventually by man.


The funds from zoos are often used to feed the animals anyway (most zoos are non profit they cant use that money for people) if you pay to go to the zoo you are paying to keep those animals alive

Zoos also educate people about animals, allowing for people to fall in love with the weird and wonderful.  They help promote habitat preservation and putting a stop to poaching. Please don’t dismiss zoos, they’re not the same places as they used to be in the 1800s, or even the mid 1900s. 

So while Zoos are absolutely miles better than they were historical, there are still many serious issues. In terms of education, while I totally get why most people believe that zoos teach people (children especially) about how to protect animals and their habitats and are great places of education, this is not actually the case. In reality viewing captive animals in zoos only teaches people how animals react to boredom, depression, and stress in captive situations. The most effective methods of education in zoos come via presenting videos, documentaries, interactive modules, graphic displays, and computer simulations. which all show animals in their natural environments and do not require any animals to actually be kept in zoos.
In terms of the work Zoos to in regards to species conservation and habitat preservation, zoos really are not effective, especially compared to other conservation and preservation work. While there are zoos that do good conservation work, most of the significant conservation work is not from zoos but other organizations that work with wildlife and natural habitats. Most animals in captivity are not even classified as endangered, with the priority of Zoos being in getting hold of animals popular with visitors, rather than those who face extinction. When it comes to breeding programs (and breeding animals in captivity aren’t the best way to help in conservation)   zoos do spend plenty of money on these programs however half of the animals being bred by Zoos are not classed as endangered in the wild and 25% are not threatened species but ones popular with visitors. It’s also actually massively more expensive to keep animals captive in zoos than to protect equivalent numbers of them in the wild! When it comes to the research, few Zoos actually support meaningful scientific research (with fewer employing scientists with full-time research jobs) and of those that do employ scientists its common for these scientists to study free-living animals rather than those within the zoo. Due to the nature of any research that does take place in zoos, the results of this research also generates little information about how to best conserve species in the wild as studies of captive animals have limited benefits to animals in the wild and animals brought up in captivity are less likely to survive in the wild if reintroduced as they often don’t have the natural behaviors needed for survival in the wild. More effective methods of habitat preservation and species conservations would be a multipronged approach tackling habitat loss and climate change, investing in conservation programs in the wild, education, working with local communities, seriously addressing poaching etc. and also to move away from the Zoo model towards more ethical and effective models of species conservation. 
Just a few of the other ethical issues with Zoos include surplus animals, who, when grow older, and are less attractive to patrons, will often be sold or killed. Animals who breed frequently also are sometimes sold to game farms and ranches where hunters pay to kill them and other surplus animals are sometimes sold to roadside zoos,, private individuals, animal dealers, or to laboratories for experimentation purposes. The animals not sold often end up being fed to other zoo animals. In terms of the health of these captive animals, many develop health conditions and mental health problems such as Zoochosis. Of course, a major problem with zoos as well is that the animals who live there are kept in enclosures that don’t allow them to live their lives in a natural way and don’t compare with the natural habitat the animals were meant to be in. Zoo animals have to spend day after day, week after week, year after year in the exact same enclosure. This makes their lives very monotonous. Take elephants, for example, elephants in the wild, are used to traveling many miles a day in herds of about ten related adults and their offspring but in zoos are usually kept in pairs or even isolated in incredibly small enclosures compared to what they are used to in the wild. Elephants kept in zoos often show many signs of being mental distress and the average lifespan of elephants in zoos is around 16-18 years, instead of the 50-70 years they can live in the wild.


I’m just going to copy paste your response when people ask me what I’m going to school for. I’m very pro zoo and I want animals in their natural habitat just as much.

This is genuinely quite an interesting discussion.

mysharona1987: little-butch-crouton: severelynerdysheep: somehavegonemissing: spookyboyfelix: princess-nakamoto: mysharona1987: N...

Pairs: i want! to sit! in a lap! and i want! to do they have to be attached I love your need to make everything cute sounds creepy I love that Well I's funny how you can make everything sound creepy/wrong but the things that you like Make this creepy: Skittles are very good it depends where you put them you challenged a god Make this creepy: An instrumental cover of a well-known song plays from another room. It starts slow rhythm inconsistent, like a child struggling with a hand-played music box. It is the unmistakable tune of Despacito, played on an old circus organ. You open your eyes slowly and squint up at a single, flickering bulb. Your head aches. How did you get here? The music throbs against the bathroom's crumbling tile walls. You are standing in front of a ceramic sink, the bowl chipped and yellowed with age. You have no memory of this place. The music speeds up. Your hands are stained with something dark and rotting. A strange taste lingers in your mouth. How did you get here? You lean towards the mirror. Your face is haggard, your eyes bloodshot. Your reflection leans forward and whispers, "Despacito can you do llike wearing glasses Most people have never seen me without my glasses. I wear them all the time. All day, at home, in bed, even in the bath sometimes. I pretty much only take them off to shower or sleep. And even then I keep them within arm's reach. Igot my first pair in middle school, and it changed my life. I've switched styles plenty of times over the years, Right now I own three pairs, not including my backups and prescription sunglasses. I'm always paranoid about losing or breaking the ones I'm wearing. Most people would be surprised to find out my eyesight isn't even that bad. ReallyI only need corrective lenses for distance. I could manage most things without them. But I like wearing glasses Not that it can't be frustrating at times Eyeglasses are always getting smudged or dirty. I have to clean mine constantly. They're fragile, and can be scratched or bent. They fall off, go askew, steam up, and collect water drops when it rains. You have to keep a protective case on hand, and a soft cloth, and glass cleaner. They can be a lot of trouble. Honestly, contact lenses would be so much more convenient I did try to switch, once. I bought a box of those new disposable contacts. And it was great at first-just put them on and go. It was freeing. My eyes adjusted quickly-no itching or redness. It didn't even feel that strange not having something on my face for the first time in years. I really thought they were going to work. They didn't, in the end. Maybe it's something about the material, the difference between actual glass versus whatever polymer the contacts were made from. Maybe it has to do with lens shape, or distance. Maybe it's even just psychological-something to do with the fact that glasses just feel more protective. I had hoped now that I was older, perhaps I wouldn't need protection. Perhaps they wouldn't come after me the way they did when I was a child. I was wrong. Glasses stop the dark things from moving you see. If I don't wear them, I start seeing the things again. Out of the corners of my eyes. In the shadows of the room. Glasses are the only thing I've found that keeps them still. And that's important. Because you see, the things aren't just moving-theyre moving closer Gaud it's past 1 am please Sometimes I just think Gaud is moved by the full and pure force of f people's minds ucking up other why the flip do u think i spend so much time on this hellsite 57,107 notes They challenged a god. They will pay for their hubris
Pairs: i want! to sit! in a lap! and i want! to
 do they have to be attached
 I love your need to make everything cute
 sounds creepy I love that
 Well I's funny how you can make
 everything sound creepy/wrong but the
 things that you like
 Make this creepy:
 Skittles are very good
 it depends where you put them
 you challenged a god
 Make this creepy:
 An instrumental cover of a well-known song
 plays from another room. It starts slow
 rhythm inconsistent, like a child struggling
 with a hand-played music box. It is the
 unmistakable tune of Despacito, played on an
 old circus organ. You open your eyes slowly
 and squint up at a single, flickering bulb. Your
 head aches. How did you get here?
 The music throbs against the bathroom's
 crumbling tile walls. You are standing in
 front of a ceramic sink, the bowl chipped and
 yellowed with age. You have no memory of
 this place. The music speeds up. Your hands
 are stained with something dark and rotting.
 A strange taste lingers in your mouth. How
 did you get here?
 You lean towards the mirror. Your face is
 haggard, your eyes bloodshot.
 Your reflection leans forward and
 whispers, "Despacito
 can you do
 llike wearing glasses
 Most people have never seen me without my
 glasses. I wear them all the time. All day, at
 home, in bed, even in the bath sometimes.
 I pretty much only take them off to shower
 or sleep. And even then I keep them within
 arm's reach.
 Igot my first pair in middle school, and it
 changed my life. I've switched styles plenty
 of times over the years, Right now I own
 three pairs, not including my backups and
 prescription sunglasses. I'm always paranoid
 about losing or breaking the ones I'm wearing.
 Most people would be surprised to find out
 my eyesight isn't even that bad. ReallyI only
 need corrective lenses for distance. I could
 manage most things without them. But I
 like wearing glasses
 Not that it can't be frustrating at times
 Eyeglasses are always getting smudged or
 dirty. I have to clean mine constantly. They're
 fragile, and can be scratched or bent. They
 fall off, go askew, steam up, and collect
 water drops when it rains. You have to keep a
 protective case on hand, and a soft cloth, and
 glass cleaner. They can be a lot of trouble.
 Honestly, contact lenses would be so much
 more convenient
 I did try to switch, once. I bought a box of
 those new disposable contacts. And it was
 great at first-just put them on and go. It was
 freeing. My eyes adjusted quickly-no itching
 or redness. It didn't even feel that strange
 not having something on my face for the
 first time in years.
 I really thought they were going to work. They
 didn't, in the end. Maybe it's something about
 the material, the difference between actual
 glass versus whatever polymer the contacts
 were made from. Maybe it has to do with
 lens shape, or distance. Maybe it's even just
 psychological-something to do with the fact
 that glasses just feel more protective. I had
 hoped now that I was older, perhaps I wouldn't
 need protection. Perhaps they wouldn't
 come after me the way they did when I was
 a child. I was wrong.
 Glasses stop the dark things from moving
 you see. If I don't wear them, I start seeing the
 things again. Out of the corners of my eyes.
 In the shadows of the room. Glasses are the
 only thing I've found that keeps them still.
 And that's important. Because you see,
 the things aren't just moving-theyre
 moving closer
 Gaud it's past 1 am please
 Sometimes I just think Gaud is moved by
 the full and pure force of f
 people's minds
 ucking up other
 why the flip do u think i spend so much
 time on this hellsite
 57,107 notes
They challenged a god. They will pay for their hubris

They challenged a god. They will pay for their hubris

Pairs: New York Times bestselling author SANDRAHILL k Times bestselling author HILL continues her sexy Deadly Angels series, as a Viking vangel's otherworldly mission pairs him with a beautiful chef who whets his thousand-year-old appetite... Once guilty of the deadly sin of gluttony, thousand- year-old Viking vampire angel Cnut Sigurdsson is now a lean, mean, vampire-devil fighting machine. His new side-job? No biggie: just ridding the world of a threat called ISIS while keeping the evil Lucipires (demon vampires) at bay. So when chef drea Stewart hires him to rescue her sister from a cult recruiting terrorists at a Montana dude ranch, vangel turns cowboy. Yeehaw! The too-tempting mortal insists on accompanying him, surprising Cnut with her bravery at every turn. But with terrorists stalking the ranch in demon- oid form, Cnut teletransports Andrea and himself out of danger-accidentally into the tenth-century Norselands. Suddenly, they have to find their way back to the future to save her family and the world.. and to satisfy their insatiable attraction. vonVomance DISCOVER GREAT AUTHORS EXCLUSIVE OFFERS, AND MORE AT HC.COM Paranormal Romance ISBN 978-0-06-235654-3 50799 AVONBOOKS Win free prizes, get exclusive content, and more-scan with a QR App now! 9780062 356543 USA $7.99/$9.99 CAN island-delver-go: secretsinthemargin: I was out with a friend tonight doing one of my fave things. Reading the backs of romance novels aloud. Found this gem. This is honestly the most wild sounding romance novel I have ever seen and thought it might brighten someone’s day.
Pairs: New York Times bestselling author SANDRAHILL
 k Times bestselling author
 HILL
 continues her sexy Deadly Angels series, as a Viking
 vangel's otherworldly mission pairs him with a beautiful
 chef who whets his thousand-year-old appetite...
 Once guilty of the deadly sin of gluttony, thousand-
 year-old Viking vampire angel Cnut Sigurdsson is
 now a lean, mean, vampire-devil fighting machine.
 His new side-job? No biggie: just ridding the
 world of a threat called ISIS while keeping the evil
 Lucipires (demon vampires) at bay. So when chef
 drea Stewart hires him to rescue her sister from
 a cult recruiting terrorists at a Montana dude ranch,
 vangel turns cowboy. Yeehaw!
 The too-tempting mortal insists on accompanying
 him, surprising Cnut with her bravery at every turn.
 But with terrorists stalking the ranch in demon-
 oid form, Cnut teletransports Andrea and himself
 out of danger-accidentally into the tenth-century
 Norselands. Suddenly, they have to find their way
 back to the future to save her family and the world..
 and to satisfy their insatiable attraction.
 vonVomance
 DISCOVER GREAT AUTHORS
 EXCLUSIVE OFFERS, AND MORE AT HC.COM
 Paranormal Romance
 ISBN 978-0-06-235654-3
 50799
 AVONBOOKS
 Win free prizes, get exclusive content,
 and more-scan with a QR App now!
 9780062 356543
 USA $7.99/$9.99 CAN
island-delver-go:
secretsinthemargin:

I was out with a friend tonight doing one of my fave things. Reading the backs of romance novels aloud. Found this gem.

This is honestly the most wild sounding romance novel I have ever seen and thought it might brighten someone’s day.

island-delver-go: secretsinthemargin: I was out with a friend tonight doing one of my fave things. Reading the backs of romance novels a...