I Think I Do
I Think I Do

I Think I Do

What People Think
What People Think

What People Think

Getting Out Of Hand
Getting Out Of Hand

Getting Out Of Hand

out-of-hand
out-of-hand

out-of-hand

gets-out-of-hand
gets-out-of-hand

gets-out-of-hand

people are talking
 people are talking

people are talking

think of you
 think of you

think of you

yours
yours

yours

highness
highness

highness

get out
get out

get out

🔥 | Latest

Bitch, Bodies , and Comfortable: sophie @pixievalkyrie Follow oh if only there was an example of a character who wears a"skimpy"outfit who is very comfortable in her sexuality and exposure instead of unwillingly being put in uncomfortable situations because of horny developers 8:19 AM- 23 Feb 2018 398 Retweets 1,059 Likes 923l 398 1.1K sophie @pixievalkyrie 24h Wanna know why Bayonetta being so over-the-top sexual works? it's consent! it's that easy!!! that's literally it!!! Bayonetta is never uncomfortable with her oversexualization because she relishes in it sophie @pixievalkyrie 24h Girls owning their bodies and being sexy is not the problem. Girls being put in situations where they're obviously uncomfortable with the situation for comedic effect or because of horny developers is the problem. trilllizard666: sindri42: videogamesincolor: niambi: batzendrick: I feel like this deserves to be shared. this is hilarious because…Bayonetta is a fictional character who therefore cannot consent to anything you geeks…she “owns” her sexuality because she’s written that way??…like…yall are really so comical. I crack up every time folk try to use Bayonetta as a counter-argument against critiques of hyper-sexualized female characters in video games. Like stop, fam. Bayonetta is literally just the power fantasy OC of the female character designer. The director wrote the original script for a “traditional” witch, elderly, crook nose, pointy hat, shapeless robes, etc. Then Mari Shimaazaki, this lady: stepped up and basically said ‘okay but what if instead of that dumb thing we used this awesome bitch I just drew’. Bayonetta was not designed by a man. She was directly contrary to the intentions of the men in charge. But once they saw how awesome she was, being a sexy badass totally on her own terms whilst not giving a shit what they thought, they submitted. Today it’s generally agreed throughout the company and much of the industry that it couldn’t have happened any other way, that only a woman could have made a female action hero as successful as Bayonetta. If she’d been designed to appeal to the audience, that would have been fundamentally contrary to who she is and probably nowhere near as successful. But since she originated as a personal power fantasy, as this woman’s idealized self, that feeling of existing for her own goals and her own pleasure and not giving a flying fuck about how anybody else saw her shone through and Bayonetta became more popular than she ever could have been if she was just trying to please others. Additional fun fact: all the frankly ridiculous dance moves she uses? Those are the result of giving the mocap actress an open stage and telling her to do whatever she felt like. the earliest drafts were even shot down for being too overtly sexual for the director’s tastes the MALE director, Hideki Kamiya
Bitch, Bodies , and Comfortable: sophie
 @pixievalkyrie
 Follow
 oh if only there was an example of a
 character who wears a"skimpy"outfit
 who is very comfortable in her sexuality
 and exposure instead of unwillingly
 being put in uncomfortable situations
 because of horny developers
 8:19 AM- 23 Feb 2018
 398 Retweets 1,059 Likes
 923l 398
 1.1K
 sophie @pixievalkyrie 24h
 Wanna know why Bayonetta being so over-the-top sexual works? it's consent! it's
 that easy!!! that's literally it!!! Bayonetta is never uncomfortable with her
 oversexualization because she relishes in it
 sophie @pixievalkyrie 24h
 Girls owning their bodies and being sexy is not the problem. Girls being put in
 situations where they're obviously uncomfortable with the situation for comedic
 effect or because of horny developers is the problem.
trilllizard666:
sindri42:

videogamesincolor:

niambi:

batzendrick:
I feel like this deserves to be shared.
this is hilarious because…Bayonetta is a fictional character who therefore cannot consent to anything you geeks…she “owns” her sexuality because she’s written that way??…like…yall are really so comical.

I crack up every time folk try to use Bayonetta as a counter-argument against critiques of hyper-sexualized female characters in video games. Like stop, fam.

Bayonetta is literally just the power fantasy OC of the female character designer. The director wrote the original script for a “traditional” witch, elderly, crook nose, pointy hat, shapeless robes, etc. Then Mari Shimaazaki, this lady:
stepped up and basically said ‘okay but what if instead of that dumb thing we used this awesome bitch I just drew’. Bayonetta was not designed by a man. She was directly contrary to the intentions of the men in charge. But once they saw how awesome she was, being a sexy badass totally on her own terms whilst not giving a shit what they thought, they submitted.
Today it’s generally agreed throughout the company and much of the industry that it couldn’t have happened any other way, that only a woman could have made a female action hero as successful as Bayonetta. If she’d been designed to appeal to the audience, that would have been fundamentally contrary to who she is and probably nowhere near as successful. But since she originated as a personal power fantasy, as this woman’s idealized self, that feeling of existing for her own goals and her own pleasure and not giving a flying fuck about how anybody else saw her shone through and Bayonetta became more popular than she ever could have been if she was just trying to please others.
Additional fun fact: all the frankly ridiculous dance moves she uses? Those are the result of giving the mocap actress an open stage and telling her to do whatever she felt like.


the earliest drafts were even shot down for being too overtly sexual for the director’s tastes
the MALE director, Hideki Kamiya

trilllizard666: sindri42: videogamesincolor: niambi: batzendrick: I feel like this deserves to be shared. this is hilarious because…Bayon...

Being Alone, Fuck You, and Love: inspectorwired movie tropes that will never get old to me .a thing happens +two people exchanging money in the back fourth wall breaking "give up all your weapons" and that one guy that spends the entire evening taking his weights worth out his pockets a terribly loud crash meowing/ car sirens heard offscreen alternatively: a terribly loud crash and one of the characters going "oops" in the most casual voice e ."fuck you" "well if you insist" nerdgasrnz #alternatively alternatively: *terribly loud crash w/ sirens and cat screeching"#person:"off camera" 'I'M OKAY, (via @zenlida) wearevengeancenowN character being all "you expect me to do X?" Gilligan Cut to character doing X susiephone the squad gets captured and interrogated separately, and they're all . people completely missing the completely unsubtle, very visible . alternatively, people absolutely seeing the completely unsubtle, very . bonus points if it's a beleaguered minimum wage employee who just telling equally terrible, completely contradictory lies dangerous thing in the room with them visible dangerous thing in the room with them and just not giving a shit goes about their business like "yep same shit as always" someone pretending they don't know another character is eavesdropping, only to casually reveal at the end of the scene that they know (leaving* "tell tom that he can come out now" "tom drops from the ceiling in spy gear, irritated') choosing to deal with the villain by just leaving them alone in a room with another character . . the "hands go down" trope . example: "any questions?" everyone's hands go up "...that AREN'T sarcastic" *everyone's hands go down scanlan how could all y'all forget "ACT NATURALI" librarian-amy Mallory Ortberg @mallelis 26 Dec 2015 I'm a simple woman, with simple tastes. If a movie features a plucky pilot shouting "we've got company" when enemies attack, I will watch it t3878 2.7K Mallory Ortberg # L-Follow FICTIONALACE: we've got company ME, chortling like a baron: oho but these are not guests but unwelcome enemies, DELIGHTFUL, this pleases us derinthemadscientist These are all great but let's not forget two characters giving extremely biased flashbacks to the same event that each paint the other as an incompetent loon stunt-muppet i would like to respectfully add: scenes where a character walks into a room, sees something scary, and turns around and walks out with no reaction or change of expression Source: inspectorwired Tropes we love
Being Alone, Fuck You, and Love: inspectorwired
 movie tropes that will never get old to me
 .a thing happens +two people exchanging money in the back
 fourth wall breaking
 "give up all your weapons" and that one guy that spends the entire
 evening taking his weights worth out his pockets
 a terribly loud crash meowing/ car sirens heard offscreen
 alternatively: a terribly loud crash and one of the characters going "oops"
 in the most casual voice
 e
 ."fuck you" "well if you insist"
 nerdgasrnz
 #alternatively alternatively: *terribly loud crash w/ sirens and cat
 screeching"#person:"off camera" 'I'M OKAY, (via @zenlida)
 wearevengeancenowN
 character being all "you expect me to do X?" Gilligan Cut to character doing X
 susiephone
 the squad gets captured and interrogated separately, and they're all
 . people completely missing the completely unsubtle, very visible
 . alternatively, people absolutely seeing the completely unsubtle, very
 . bonus points if it's a beleaguered minimum wage employee who just
 telling equally terrible, completely contradictory lies
 dangerous thing in the room with them
 visible dangerous thing in the room with them and just not giving a shit
 goes about their business like "yep same shit as always"
 someone pretending they don't know another character is
 eavesdropping, only to casually reveal at the end of the scene that they
 know (leaving* "tell tom that he can come out now" "tom drops from the
 ceiling in spy gear, irritated')
 choosing to deal with the villain by just leaving them alone in a room with
 another character
 .
 . the "hands go down" trope
 . example: "any questions?" everyone's hands go up "...that AREN'T
 sarcastic" *everyone's hands go down
 scanlan
 how could all y'all forget "ACT NATURALI"
 librarian-amy
 Mallory Ortberg @mallelis 26 Dec 2015
 I'm a simple woman, with simple tastes. If a movie features a plucky pilot
 shouting "we've got company" when enemies attack, I will watch it
 t3878
 2.7K
 Mallory Ortberg
 #
 L-Follow
 FICTIONALACE: we've got company
 ME, chortling like a baron: oho but these are
 not guests but unwelcome enemies,
 DELIGHTFUL, this pleases us
 derinthemadscientist
 These are all great but let's not forget two characters giving extremely biased
 flashbacks to the same event that each paint the other as an incompetent loon
 stunt-muppet
 i would like to respectfully add: scenes where a character walks into a room,
 sees something scary, and turns around and walks out with no reaction or
 change of expression
 Source: inspectorwired
Tropes we love

Tropes we love

Carrie Fisher, Dove, and Drinking: BECA TRBECA% F LM FEST VAL ECA FİLM FESTIVAL VAL FE TRIBECA FİLM FESTIVAL RBECA FILM TR BECA FILM FEST VAL FESTIVAL ︶ vox: To Carrie Fisher, a woman who knew the power of accepting yourself without apology Carrie Fisher spent a lifetime fighting people’s expectations and found a new hope in not giving a shit what I, you, or anyone else thought of her — which is exactly why I’ve always thought the world of her. My introduction to Fisher was the same as most people’s: staring up at a screen in wide-eyed admiration and wonder as her steely Princess Leia took Star Wars by storm and sheer force of will. She was a 19-year-old thrown into the twin chaoses of deep space and Hollywood, and she proved a shining star in both. But as I grew older and dove deeper into Fisher’s history and ongoing career, I discovered a life overflowing with wit, advocacy, and incredible strength. As she would be the first to tell you, Fisher’s life co-starred a devastating cocktail of addiction and mental illness. Thrust into the most competitive Hollywood echelons before she was 20 — and having grown up around it, being the daughter of singer Eddie Fisher and actress Debbie Reynolds — she absorbed whatever chemicals she could to get by, not believing the doctors who told her that her addictions were exacerbated by a form of manic depression. (She was later diagnosed as bipolar.) In 1987, with the benefit of hindsight, Fisher wrote in her semi-autobiographical novel Postcards from the Edge about the horrors of being trapped inside your own mind while outside pressures do everything they can to cave in the walls. “I shot through my 20s like a luminous thread through a dark needle, blazing toward my destination,” she wrote. “Nowhere.” But in real life, Carrie Fisher wasn’t just going somewhere, she was going somewhere meaningful and funny and relentlessly smart. She came out of her turbulent 20s determined to forge a new path, one that defied anyone to look at her and see a girl in a gold bikini while conveniently ignoring its accompanying chains. (Fisher famously hated that stupid “outfit,” no matter how many adolescent fantasies it inspired. When promoting 2015’s The Force Awakens, she even made sure to remind everyone that the Slave Leia bikini was for a slave, “a prisoner of a giant testicle.”) Carrie Fisher wrote her way out of her own horror, from Postcards from the Edge in 1987 to her wickedly funny one-woman show Wishful Drinking in 2006, to her journal compilation The Princess Diarist, published just a month ago. All along the way, she was open about her struggles and mental health in a way that few dared — and she was funny while she did it. You don’t have to look any further than her Twitter bio — “there’s no room for demons when you’re self-possessed” — to understand exactly who Carrie Fisher was. She was crucially, completely unashamed of who she was, talking openly about her mental breaks, the psychotic episodes that would send her careening and land her in clinics. She made it clear that while she knew her brain could be an insidious Trojan horse determined to make her life hell from the inside out, she was able to persevere by accepting that reality as fact. “I am mentally ill. I can say that. I am not ashamed of that,” Fisher told Sawyer in that 2000 interview. “I survived that, I’m still surviving it, but bring it on. Better me than you.” Carrie Fisher took on the dark forces inside and surrounding her by finding something precious to hold onto, something to humanize, something to laugh about. She stormed through her chaotic mind and world to forge an unapologetic life, inspiring countless others — like me, and maybe even you — to do the same.
Carrie Fisher, Dove, and Drinking: BECA
 TRBECA%
 F LM
 FEST VAL
 ECA
 FİLM
 FESTIVAL
 VAL
 FE
 TRIBECA
 FİLM
 FESTIVAL
 RBECA
 FILM
 TR BECA
 FILM
 FEST VAL
 FESTIVAL ︶
vox:
To Carrie Fisher, a woman who knew the power of accepting yourself without apology
Carrie Fisher spent a lifetime fighting people’s expectations and found a new hope in not giving a shit what I, you, or anyone else thought of her — which is exactly why I’ve always thought the world of her.
My introduction to Fisher was the same as most people’s: staring up at a screen in wide-eyed admiration and wonder as her steely Princess Leia took Star Wars by storm and sheer force of will. She was a 19-year-old thrown into the twin chaoses of deep space and Hollywood, and she proved a shining star in both.
But as I grew older and dove deeper into Fisher’s history and ongoing career, I discovered a life overflowing with wit, advocacy, and incredible strength.
As she would be the first to tell you, Fisher’s life co-starred a devastating cocktail of addiction and mental illness. Thrust into the most competitive Hollywood echelons before she was 20 — and having grown up around it, being the daughter of singer Eddie Fisher and actress Debbie Reynolds — she absorbed whatever chemicals she could to get by, not believing the doctors who told her that her addictions were exacerbated by a form of manic depression. (She was later diagnosed as bipolar.)
In 1987, with the benefit of hindsight, Fisher wrote in her semi-autobiographical novel Postcards from the Edge about the horrors of being trapped inside your own mind while outside pressures do everything they can to cave in the walls. “I shot through my 20s like a luminous thread through a dark needle, blazing toward my destination,” she wrote. “Nowhere.”
But in real life, Carrie Fisher wasn’t just going somewhere, she was going somewhere meaningful and funny and relentlessly smart. She came out of her turbulent 20s determined to forge a new path, one that defied anyone to look at her and see a girl in a gold bikini while conveniently ignoring its accompanying chains.
(Fisher famously hated that stupid “outfit,” no matter how many adolescent fantasies it inspired. When promoting 2015’s The Force Awakens, she even made sure to remind everyone that the Slave Leia bikini was for a slave, “a prisoner of a giant testicle.”)
Carrie Fisher wrote her way out of her own horror, from Postcards from the Edge in 1987 to her wickedly funny one-woman show Wishful Drinking in 2006, to her journal compilation The Princess Diarist, published just a month ago.
All along the way, she was open about her struggles and mental health in a way that few dared — and she was funny while she did it. You don’t have to look any further than her Twitter bio — “there’s no room for demons when you’re self-possessed” — to understand exactly who Carrie Fisher was.
She was crucially, completely unashamed of who she was, talking openly about her mental breaks, the psychotic episodes that would send her careening and land her in clinics. She made it clear that while she knew her brain could be an insidious Trojan horse determined to make her life hell from the inside out, she was able to persevere by accepting that reality as fact.
“I am mentally ill. I can say that. I am not ashamed of that,” Fisher told Sawyer in that 2000 interview. “I survived that, I’m still surviving it, but bring it on. Better me than you.”
Carrie Fisher took on the dark forces inside and surrounding her by finding something precious to hold onto, something to humanize, something to laugh about. She stormed through her chaotic mind and world to forge an unapologetic life, inspiring countless others — like me, and maybe even you — to do the same.

vox: To Carrie Fisher, a woman who knew the power of accepting yourself without apology Carrie Fisher spent a lifetime fighting people’s exp...