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My Photos: flawisth: more of my photos here
My Photos: flawisth:

more of my photos here

flawisth: more of my photos here

My Photos: I took grad photos with my boyfriend of the time, and after learning about our breakup, my aunt “fixed” my photos.
My Photos: I took grad photos with my boyfriend of the time, and after learning about our breakup, my aunt “fixed” my photos.

I took grad photos with my boyfriend of the time, and after learning about our breakup, my aunt “fixed” my photos.

My Photos: makaveli-immortalized: Tupac Shakur with Chi Modu Over the years, people have always said that my images of Tupac let them see a side of him beyond the Thug Life image, more about the human being. Before he was loved by the world, he was a young man trying to make his way in a society that is extremely cruel to the less fortunate. He made it his mission to speak for those in his community who needed to hear “keep your head up!” As I travel the globe, I’m amazed at how many people have told me that Tupac saved their lives. His words and passion inspired a generation, and these pictures that we created together help to keep that inspiration alive. It’s always sad when people die young, but if you leave behind the kind of legacy that Tupac did, you never actually die. You remain forever in the hearts and minds of people for generations to come. I knew that about him when we first spent time together in Atlanta, Georgia back in 1994. We both knew the importance of images and we set out to do a thorough job, not knowing what the future would hold. He died two years after that meeting in Atlanta, but his words and these images are all part of his lasting legacy. When I met him on location in Atlanta in ’94 he was quite cooperative and a really nice guy. It was a shoot for The Source magazine, and he arrived early. Tupac was the ultimate professional, and he respected my time and my skills. The public might not know that about him. They think he was just this crazy guy who had no real limits, but he completely understood who he was, and if he understood what you brought to the table, he was easy to deal with. In fact, we got along great. I think a lot of people want to buy into the ‘thug life’ image and the younger side of him, because he was still a young man. Let’s be clear, you kind of forget the ages of these folks. To be so prolific and so young, and have so much power — it’s hard to imagine Even with all the childishness — which I believe was age appropriate in a lot of ways—when you throw power and money in there, even with all that, he had a lot of care and love for his community and for the less fortunate. He always spoke on behalf of black people who were struggling. Even though he wrote songs that many would consider typical hip-hop party music, he also included a lot of black empowerment in his lyrics — “Brenda’s Got a Baby,” “Dear Mama” — which I believe is why women liked him. They loved him because he was real and he cared. We knew the silly side of him too, but who isn’t silly at the age of twenty five? So that never surprised me when he did the zany stuff. He was young and full of power in a world that’s biased against blacks, so what do you expect? Normally when I would see Tupac, I would always think of him being on blast — excited and moving at a hundred miles an hour. But when I first met him he wasn’t really like that. It’s funny how everyone always thinks about Tupac and the ladies, but I never really saw him chasing women that much. He was much more focused on his mission. I think that’s what made him stand out so much from his peers. Because while everybody was partying, this man was trying to make sure he created his legacy. And so here we are decades later talking about the man as if he’s still around. I don’t think you can take lightly the fact that this is two decades later and we’re still talking about this man. After we finished his first Source cover shoot in Atlanta, we went back to his home in Stone Mountain, GA to hang out. He called me aside and showed me his entire gun collection in his bedroom—all his AKs, banana clips, Glocks, everything. Then he moved a picture on the wall in his bedroom, revealing a bullet hole. This was from when he fired a shot in his bedroom because he was on probation and prohibited from going to the firing range. We all laughed afterwards. We would’ve all been in our 40s together, but he never got to his 40s, he didn’t even see his 30s with us. So that’s quite a body of work and experience that he put in during his short time on this Earth. He was one of the few stars who could cross over without compromising his roots. Tupac wasn’t going to compromise, that wasn’t him, but Versace still wanted to use him for their campaign. It’s funny when I see rappers trying to do that sort of thing. I think when you start to move in those commercial circles they make you change yourself to fit. You lose your authenticity, but Tupac wouldn’t allow that of himself. He took the streets with him wherever he went. The portrait shots of Tupac, like the one that’s on the cover of the book, were actually done with a 4x5 camera, which is a view camera. It’s the camera where you put the curtain over your head to focus. It’s large format. It sits on a tripod, and you put the film in, come out from behind the camera, you click it, then you switch the film. Kind of like the old style cameras. At that session in Atlanta, I photographed Tupac with my 4x5 with no assistant. It was just me and his people. When you shoot using a 4x5 you’re really very close to the subject. I was no more than three or four feet from him. I’m there but the gap between us is the camera, even though I’m right there with them. When you’re that close to someone frame after frame, that’s really how they get to know you. You’re almost breathing on each other, and I’m telling him, ‘Lift your head, bring your eyes down.’ I’m giving him instructions so he can look better. Once you spend hours with someone like that, you know them forever. I’m looking at every pore on your face. I’m on your team. In doing that first photo shoot in 4x5, I think that’s what made Tupac so comfortable with me because I was looking in his eyes, he was looking in mine at the same time, and real recognizes real. Once we got to that place we were cool. He gave me pictures he didn’t give anybody else and he said, ‘These are for you, Chi.’ Everybody knows the Thug Life Tupac, and we know that well. But they don’t know the Tupac in the quiet moments. Like that picture of him tying his bandana over his head, the profile shot. That’s an outtake. He was fixing his bandana with a cigarette in his mouth but he was relaxed enough around me where I could just photograph him. As a result you see a picture of a much more gentle Tupac. For me gentle and soft are not the same thing. Tupac was gentle but you wouldn’t dare step to him. He was prepared to take it where it needed to go. He wasn’t afraid. That’s who he was to me, and we got along from the first time we met. We were cool, so I got access to him that no one else could get. Tupac wanted me to shoot his album Me Against the World, he told me to get in touch with the art director in New York. By the time I went there to meet, they had already given the assignment to someone else. What’s funny is I had already taken what would later become the most iconic imagery of Tupac. So when you look at the more famous portraits of Tupac like him tying his bandanna and the Rolling Stone cover, I had already created those pictures before I went to meet the art director to discuss the album. No one knew at the time that the photos I took of him would be the images people remember and not the ones they used on the album. In a way you end up getting your justice if you wait long enough When I set out to take these photographs I knew they were important. I wanted to make sure the images stayed within the community. I wanted to make sure the person who created them was from the community. Historically that never really happens. Most of the visuals of the greats are owned and controlled by other people. That’s tricky because then they can put their interpretation on it. But when you look at my photographs, I’m there with them. I’m one of them even though I’m an observer. I was close enough to live it and I had the skills to document and record it. I had four sessions with him, and since we were close he let me in close. It’s friends hanging out with friends and there just happened to be a camera present. You can see the closeness and the warmth because I didn’t really look at my subjects as just celebrities. I saw them as young black guys like me. It allowed me to get closer and it allowed them to be comfortable and just be who they were. I offered no judgment. I was just there to document and make people look good. Even though I was the creator of these images, I’ve always felt more like the caretaker of them, because he was the world’s Tupac, not just my photo subject. He burned bright when he was here and his flame continues to glow. Thank you for being the voice of the voiceless, Tupac. Rest in peace, brother. Excerpted from Tupac Shakur: Uncategorized by Chi Modu, a 200-page hardcover book featuring over 100 powerful images of Tupac Shakur.
My Photos: makaveli-immortalized:
Tupac Shakur with Chi Modu
Over
 the years, people have always said that my images of Tupac let them see
 a side of him beyond the Thug Life image, more about the human being. 
Before he was loved by the world, he was a young man trying to make his 
way in a society that is extremely cruel to the less fortunate. He made 
it his mission to speak for those in his community who needed to hear 
“keep your head up!” As I travel the globe, I’m amazed at how many 
people have told me that Tupac saved their lives. His words and passion 
inspired a generation, and these pictures that we created together help 
to keep that inspiration alive.
It’s
 always sad when people die young, but if you leave behind the kind of 
legacy that Tupac did, you never actually die. You remain forever in the
 hearts and minds of people for generations to come. I knew that about 
him when we first spent time together in Atlanta, Georgia back in 1994. 
We both knew the importance of images and we set out to do a thorough 
job, not knowing what the future would hold. He died two years after 
that meeting in Atlanta, but his words and these images are all part of 
his lasting legacy.
When I met him on location in Atlanta in ’94 he was quite cooperative and a really nice guy. It was a shoot for The Source
 magazine, and he arrived early. Tupac was the ultimate professional, 
and he respected my time and my skills. The public might not know that 
about him. They think he was just this crazy guy who had no real limits,
 but he completely understood who he was, and if he understood what you 
brought to the table, he was easy to deal with. In fact, we got along 
great. I think a lot of people want to buy into the ‘thug life’ image 
and the younger side of him, because he was still a young man. Let’s be 
clear, you kind of forget the ages of these folks. To be so prolific and
 so young, and have so much power — it’s hard to imagine
Even
 with all the childishness — which I believe was age appropriate in a 
lot of ways—when you throw power and money in there, even with all that,
 he had a lot of care and love for his community and for the less 
fortunate. He always spoke on behalf of black people who were 
struggling.
Even
 though he wrote songs that many would consider typical hip-hop party 
music, he also included a lot of black empowerment in his 
lyrics — “Brenda’s Got a Baby,” “Dear Mama” — which I believe is why 
women liked him. They loved him because he was real and he cared. We 
knew the silly side of him too, but who isn’t silly at the age of twenty
 five? So that never surprised me when he did the zany stuff. He was 
young and full of power in a world that’s biased against blacks, so what
 do you expect?
Normally
 when I would see Tupac, I would always think of him being on 
blast — excited and moving at a hundred miles an hour. But when I first 
met him he wasn’t really like that. It’s funny how everyone always 
thinks about Tupac and the ladies, but I never really saw him chasing 
women that much. He was much more focused on his mission. I think that’s
 what made him stand out so much from his peers. Because while everybody
 was partying, this man was trying to make sure he created his legacy. 
And so here we are decades later talking about the man as if he’s still 
around. I don’t think you can take lightly the fact that this is two 
decades later and we’re still talking about this man.
After we finished his first Source
 cover shoot in Atlanta, we went back to his home in Stone Mountain, GA 
to hang out. He called me aside and showed me his entire gun collection 
in his bedroom—all his AKs, banana clips, Glocks, everything. Then he 
moved a picture on the wall in his bedroom, revealing a bullet hole. 
This was from when he fired a shot in his bedroom because he was on 
probation and prohibited from going to the firing range. We all laughed 
afterwards.
We
 would’ve all been in our 40s together, but he never got to his 40s, he 
didn’t even see his 30s with us. So that’s quite a body of work and 
experience that he put in during his short time on this Earth.
He
 was one of the few stars who could cross over without compromising his 
roots. Tupac wasn’t going to compromise, that wasn’t him, but Versace 
still wanted to use him for their campaign. It’s funny when I see 
rappers trying to do that sort of thing. I think when you start to move 
in those commercial circles they make you change yourself to fit. You 
lose your authenticity, but Tupac wouldn’t allow that of himself. He 
took the streets with him wherever he went.
The
 portrait shots of Tupac, like the one that’s on the cover of the book, 
were actually done with a 4x5 camera, which is a view camera. It’s the 
camera where you put the curtain over your head to focus. It’s large 
format. It sits on a tripod, and you put the film in, come out from 
behind the camera, you click it, then you switch the film. Kind of like 
the old style cameras. At that session in Atlanta, I photographed Tupac 
with my 4x5 with no assistant. It was just me and his people. When you 
shoot using a 4x5 you’re really very close to the subject. I was no more
 than three or four feet from him. I’m there but the gap between us is 
the camera, even though I’m right there with them. When you’re that 
close to someone frame after frame, that’s really how they get to know 
you. You’re almost breathing on each other, and I’m telling him, ‘Lift 
your head, bring your eyes down.’ I’m giving him instructions so he can 
look better.
Once
 you spend hours with someone like that, you know them forever. I’m 
looking at every pore on your face. I’m on your team. In doing that 
first photo shoot in 4x5, I think that’s what made Tupac so comfortable 
with me because I was looking in his eyes, he was looking in mine at the
 same time, and real recognizes real. Once we got to that place we were 
cool. He gave me pictures he didn’t give anybody else and he said, 
‘These are for you, Chi.’
Everybody knows the Thug Life
 Tupac, and we know that well. But they don’t know the Tupac in the 
quiet moments. Like that picture of him tying his bandana over his head,
 the profile shot. That’s an outtake. He was fixing his bandana with a 
cigarette in his mouth but he was relaxed enough around me where I could
 just photograph him.
As
 a result you see a picture of a much more gentle Tupac. For me gentle 
and soft are not the same thing. Tupac was gentle but you wouldn’t dare 
step to him. He was prepared to take it where it needed to go. He wasn’t
 afraid. That’s who he was to me, and we got along from the first time 
we met. We were cool, so I got access to him that no one else could get.
Tupac wanted me to shoot his album Me Against the World, he
 told me to get in touch with the art director in New York. By the time I
 went there to meet, they had already given the assignment to someone 
else. What’s funny is I had already taken what would later become the 
most iconic imagery of Tupac. So when you look at the more famous 
portraits of Tupac like him tying his bandanna and the Rolling Stone
 cover, I had already created those pictures before I went to meet the 
art director to discuss the album. No one knew at the time that the 
photos I took of him would be the images people remember and not the 
ones they used on the album. In a way you end up getting your justice if
 you wait long enough
When I set out to take
 these photographs I knew they were important. I wanted to make sure the
 images stayed within the community. I wanted to make sure the person 
who created them was from the community. Historically that never really 
happens. Most of the visuals of the greats are owned and controlled by 
other people. That’s tricky because then they can put their 
interpretation on it. But when you look at my photographs, I’m there 
with them. I’m one of them even though I’m an observer. I was close 
enough to live it and I had the skills to document and record it.
I
 had four sessions with him, and since we were close he let me in close.
 It’s friends hanging out with friends and there just happened to be a 
camera present. You can see the closeness and the warmth because I 
didn’t really look at my subjects as just celebrities. I saw them as 
young black guys like me. It allowed me to get closer and it allowed 
them to be comfortable and just be who they were. I offered no judgment.
 I was just there to document and make people look good.
Even though I was the creator of these images, I’ve always felt more like the caretaker of them, because he was the world’s
 Tupac, not just my photo subject. He burned bright when he was here and
 his flame continues to glow. Thank you for being the voice of the 
voiceless, Tupac. Rest in peace, brother.
Excerpted from Tupac Shakur: Uncategorized by Chi Modu, a 200-page hardcover book featuring over 100 powerful images of Tupac Shakur.

makaveli-immortalized: Tupac Shakur with Chi Modu Over the years, people have always said that my images of Tupac let them see a side o...

My Photos: your muse @MuseMiski FollowV Instagram deleted my picture- read below. Ig musegold musegold musegold I took this last November, in a moment of celebration for finally finding pants that fit both my waist and hips. This celebration was cut short when enough ppl reported it for @instagram to take it down. Usually I wouldn't address this- but here's the thing: I'm covered from head to toe, and yet my picture was seen as "inappropriate" enough to get deleted. My whole life l've struggled w/ body image issues & only in recent years have I come to appreciate my curvy body. Being a curvy Muslim woman hasn't been a easy journey. l've been made aware my whole life that my body takes up too much space and evokes negativity from mean aunties and men alike. If my hips weren't as wide, would my picture have ever been taken down? Probably not. This is the double standard in the Muslim community, as well as beyond the Muslim community. Curvy is tacitly seen as immodest-- sexualized by default-- so my photos as a curvy hijabi consumed and seen as obscene. For centuries now, men have been policing women on how they should act, dress, speak, etc and this incident is just another example. I don't believe in comparing myself to other women, because they're not my competition, but the harsh reality is that it's easier to be a slimmer hijabi wearing this same outfit. I'm tired of being told I shouldn't wear certain things because I'm not a size 4-6, a size range l haven't fit in since elementary school Growing up I never saw anyone that looked like me in the media and I definitely didn't see a black, curvy, hijabi-- and still haven't to this day. Representation is important to me Seeing women like Serena Williams, Ashley Graham, etc., feel beautiful in their skin is a inspiration to all in a world that tells women the opposite. I come from a community where ppl who look like me are not visible and are constantly shamed. This is my body & I'm not hiding it anymore to make others comfortable. Love yours 1 MINUTE AGO RETWEETS LIKES 2,459 4,706 ghettablasta:This young woman deserves a standing ovation. 
My Photos: your muse
 @MuseMiski
 FollowV
 Instagram deleted my picture- read below. Ig
 musegold

 musegold

 musegold I took this last November, in a moment of
 celebration for finally finding pants that fit both my waist
 and hips. This celebration was cut short when enough ppl
 reported it for @instagram to take it down. Usually I
 wouldn't address this- but here's the thing: I'm covered
 from head to toe, and yet my picture was seen as
 "inappropriate" enough to get deleted. My whole life l've
 struggled w/ body image issues & only in recent years have
 I come to appreciate my curvy body. Being a curvy Muslim
 woman hasn't been a easy journey. l've been made aware
 my whole life that my body takes up too much space and
 evokes negativity from mean aunties and men alike. If my
 hips weren't as wide, would my picture have ever been
 taken down? Probably not. This is the double standard in
 the Muslim community, as well as beyond the Muslim
 community. Curvy is tacitly seen as immodest-- sexualized
 by default-- so my photos as a curvy hijabi consumed and
 seen as obscene. For centuries now, men have been
 policing women on how they should act, dress, speak, etc
 and this incident is just another example. I don't believe in
 comparing myself to other women, because they're not my
 competition, but the harsh reality is that it's easier to be a
 slimmer hijabi wearing this same outfit. I'm tired of being
 told I shouldn't wear certain things because I'm not a size
 4-6, a size range l haven't fit in since elementary school
 Growing up I never saw anyone that looked like me in the
 media and I definitely didn't see a black, curvy, hijabi-- and
 still haven't to this day. Representation is important to me
 Seeing women like Serena Williams, Ashley Graham, etc.,
 feel beautiful in their skin is a inspiration to all in a world
 that tells women the opposite. I come from a community
 where ppl who look like me are not visible and are
 constantly shamed. This is my body & I'm not hiding it
 anymore to make others comfortable. Love yours
 1 MINUTE AGO

 RETWEETS
 LIKES
 2,459 4,706
ghettablasta:This young woman deserves a standing ovation. 

ghettablasta:This young woman deserves a standing ovation. 

My Photos: My Ex is a.... Hoe Foreshore <p>Going through my photos I found one of my Ex-girlfriend via /r/memes <a href="http://ift.tt/2lUVxSx">http://ift.tt/2lUVxSx</a></p>
My Photos: My Ex is a....
 Hoe Foreshore
<p>Going through my photos I found one of my Ex-girlfriend via /r/memes <a href="http://ift.tt/2lUVxSx">http://ift.tt/2lUVxSx</a></p>

<p>Going through my photos I found one of my Ex-girlfriend via /r/memes <a href="http://ift.tt/2lUVxSx">http://ift.tt/2lUVxSx</a></p>

My Photos: 8 merylstreepismymom: This was my photo on grindr and I got banned
My Photos: 8
merylstreepismymom:

This was my photo on grindr and I got banned

merylstreepismymom: This was my photo on grindr and I got banned

My Photos: 8 merylstreepismymom: This was my photo on grindr and I got banned
My Photos: 8
merylstreepismymom:

This was my photo on grindr and I got banned

merylstreepismymom: This was my photo on grindr and I got banned