Lived
Lived

Lived

These
These

These

Do Not Tap On Glass
Do Not Tap On Glass

Do Not Tap On Glass

Friendly
Friendly

Friendly

Tourist
Tourist

Tourist

Majesticity
Majesticity

Majesticity

Waaah
Waaah

Waaah

natural
natural

natural

observers
 observers

observers

glassing
 glassing

glassing

🔥 | Latest

habitat: Slowly the paper towels and toilet paper start to reappear in their natural habitat, I think we can all agree; the earth is healing.
habitat: Slowly the paper towels and toilet paper start to reappear in their natural habitat, I think we can all agree; the earth is healing.

Slowly the paper towels and toilet paper start to reappear in their natural habitat, I think we can all agree; the earth is healing.

habitat: Slowly the paper towels and toilet paper start to reappear in their natural habitat, I think we can all agree; the earth is healing.
habitat: Slowly the paper towels and toilet paper start to reappear in their natural habitat, I think we can all agree; the earth is healing.

Slowly the paper towels and toilet paper start to reappear in their natural habitat, I think we can all agree; the earth is healing.

habitat: Engineers in their natural habitat
habitat: Engineers in their natural habitat

Engineers in their natural habitat

habitat: Stingray in it’s natural habitat
habitat: Stingray in it’s natural habitat

Stingray in it’s natural habitat

habitat: An extremely rare Doggopotamus in his natural habitat
habitat: An extremely rare Doggopotamus in his natural habitat

An extremely rare Doggopotamus in his natural habitat

habitat: (Ja)ded @thefathippy 20h maooo000 Judy Harris Yesterday at 5:04 PM. 0+ Why the zoo charge us to look at animals they stole? this ain't even yall shit Sharon @MySharona1987 Replying to @thefathippy To be fair, they are doing a lot to help pandas screw. 4:56 AM- 11 Jul 2018 mysharona1987: little-butch-crouton: severelynerdysheep: somehavegonemissing: spookyboyfelix: princess-nakamoto: mysharona1987: No, seriously: I do think zoos do a *lot* of good. Much of the time. It’s not necessarily a Seaworld situation. Yeah a lot of animals don’t even have habitats anymore anyway. So zoos are just giving them a home. Even if people come to see them nearly everyday, its better then being kicked out of their habitat eventually by man. The funds from zoos are often used to feed the animals anyway (most zoos are non profit they cant use that money for people) if you pay to go to the zoo you are paying to keep those animals alive Zoos also educate people about animals, allowing for people to fall in love with the weird and wonderful. They help promote habitat preservation and putting a stop to poaching. Please don’t dismiss zoos, they’re not the same places as they used to be in the 1800s, or even the mid 1900s. So while Zoos are absolutely miles better than they were historical, there are still many serious issues. In terms of education, while I totally get why most people believe that zoos teach people (children especially) about how to protect animals and their habitats and are great places of education, this is not actually the case. In reality viewing captive animals in zoos only teaches people how animals react to boredom, depression, and stress in captive situations. The most effective methods of education in zoos come via presenting videos, documentaries, interactive modules, graphic displays, and computer simulations. which all show animals in their natural environments and do not require any animals to actually be kept in zoos. In terms of the work Zoos to in regards to species conservation and habitat preservation, zoos really are not effective, especially compared to other conservation and preservation work. While there are zoos that do good conservation work, most of the significant conservation work is not from zoos but other organizations that work with wildlife and natural habitats. Most animals in captivity are not even classified as endangered, with the priority of Zoos being in getting hold of animals popular with visitors, rather than those who face extinction. When it comes to breeding programs (and breeding animals in captivity aren’t the best way to help in conservation)   zoos do spend plenty of money on these programs however half of the animals being bred by Zoos are not classed as endangered in the wild and 25% are not threatened species but ones popular with visitors. It’s also actually massively more expensive to keep animals captive in zoos than to protect equivalent numbers of them in the wild! When it comes to the research, few Zoos actually support meaningful scientific research (with fewer employing scientists with full-time research jobs) and of those that do employ scientists its common for these scientists to study free-living animals rather than those within the zoo. Due to the nature of any research that does take place in zoos, the results of this research also generates little information about how to best conserve species in the wild as studies of captive animals have limited benefits to animals in the wild and animals brought up in captivity are less likely to survive in the wild if reintroduced as they often don’t have the natural behaviors needed for survival in the wild. More effective methods of habitat preservation and species conservations would be a multipronged approach tackling habitat loss and climate change, investing in conservation programs in the wild, education, working with local communities, seriously addressing poaching etc. and also to move away from the Zoo model towards more ethical and effective models of species conservation.  Just a few of the other ethical issues with Zoos include surplus animals, who, when grow older, and are less attractive to patrons, will often be sold or killed. Animals who breed frequently also are sometimes sold to game farms and ranches where hunters pay to kill them and other surplus animals are sometimes sold to roadside zoos,, private individuals, animal dealers, or to laboratories for experimentation purposes. The animals not sold often end up being fed to other zoo animals. In terms of the health of these captive animals, many develop health conditions and mental health problems such as Zoochosis. Of course, a major problem with zoos as well is that the animals who live there are kept in enclosures that don’t allow them to live their lives in a natural way and don’t compare with the natural habitat the animals were meant to be in. Zoo animals have to spend day after day, week after week, year after year in the exact same enclosure. This makes their lives very monotonous. Take elephants, for example, elephants in the wild, are used to traveling many miles a day in herds of about ten related adults and their offspring but in zoos are usually kept in pairs or even isolated in incredibly small enclosures compared to what they are used to in the wild. Elephants kept in zoos often show many signs of being mental distress and the average lifespan of elephants in zoos is around 16-18 years, instead of the 50-70 years they can live in the wild. I’m just going to copy paste your response when people ask me what I’m going to school for. I’m very pro zoo and I want animals in their natural habitat just as much. This is genuinely quite an interesting discussion.
habitat: (Ja)ded @thefathippy 20h
 maooo000
 Judy Harris
 Yesterday at 5:04 PM.
 0+
 Why the zoo charge us to
 look at animals they stole?
 this ain't even yall shit
 Sharon
 @MySharona1987
 Replying to @thefathippy
 To be fair, they are doing a lot to help pandas
 screw.
 4:56 AM- 11 Jul 2018
mysharona1987:

little-butch-crouton:
severelynerdysheep:

somehavegonemissing:

spookyboyfelix:

princess-nakamoto:


mysharona1987:


No, seriously: I do think zoos do a *lot* of good. Much of the time.
It’s not necessarily a Seaworld situation.


Yeah a lot of animals don’t even have habitats anymore anyway. So zoos are just giving them a home. Even if people come to see them nearly everyday, its better then being kicked out of their habitat eventually by man.


The funds from zoos are often used to feed the animals anyway (most zoos are non profit they cant use that money for people) if you pay to go to the zoo you are paying to keep those animals alive

Zoos also educate people about animals, allowing for people to fall in love with the weird and wonderful.  They help promote habitat preservation and putting a stop to poaching. Please don’t dismiss zoos, they’re not the same places as they used to be in the 1800s, or even the mid 1900s. 

So while Zoos are absolutely miles better than they were historical, there are still many serious issues. In terms of education, while I totally get why most people believe that zoos teach people (children especially) about how to protect animals and their habitats and are great places of education, this is not actually the case. In reality viewing captive animals in zoos only teaches people how animals react to boredom, depression, and stress in captive situations. The most effective methods of education in zoos come via presenting videos, documentaries, interactive modules, graphic displays, and computer simulations. which all show animals in their natural environments and do not require any animals to actually be kept in zoos.
In terms of the work Zoos to in regards to species conservation and habitat preservation, zoos really are not effective, especially compared to other conservation and preservation work. While there are zoos that do good conservation work, most of the significant conservation work is not from zoos but other organizations that work with wildlife and natural habitats. Most animals in captivity are not even classified as endangered, with the priority of Zoos being in getting hold of animals popular with visitors, rather than those who face extinction. When it comes to breeding programs (and breeding animals in captivity aren’t the best way to help in conservation)   zoos do spend plenty of money on these programs however half of the animals being bred by Zoos are not classed as endangered in the wild and 25% are not threatened species but ones popular with visitors. It’s also actually massively more expensive to keep animals captive in zoos than to protect equivalent numbers of them in the wild! When it comes to the research, few Zoos actually support meaningful scientific research (with fewer employing scientists with full-time research jobs) and of those that do employ scientists its common for these scientists to study free-living animals rather than those within the zoo. Due to the nature of any research that does take place in zoos, the results of this research also generates little information about how to best conserve species in the wild as studies of captive animals have limited benefits to animals in the wild and animals brought up in captivity are less likely to survive in the wild if reintroduced as they often don’t have the natural behaviors needed for survival in the wild. More effective methods of habitat preservation and species conservations would be a multipronged approach tackling habitat loss and climate change, investing in conservation programs in the wild, education, working with local communities, seriously addressing poaching etc. and also to move away from the Zoo model towards more ethical and effective models of species conservation. 
Just a few of the other ethical issues with Zoos include surplus animals, who, when grow older, and are less attractive to patrons, will often be sold or killed. Animals who breed frequently also are sometimes sold to game farms and ranches where hunters pay to kill them and other surplus animals are sometimes sold to roadside zoos,, private individuals, animal dealers, or to laboratories for experimentation purposes. The animals not sold often end up being fed to other zoo animals. In terms of the health of these captive animals, many develop health conditions and mental health problems such as Zoochosis. Of course, a major problem with zoos as well is that the animals who live there are kept in enclosures that don’t allow them to live their lives in a natural way and don’t compare with the natural habitat the animals were meant to be in. Zoo animals have to spend day after day, week after week, year after year in the exact same enclosure. This makes their lives very monotonous. Take elephants, for example, elephants in the wild, are used to traveling many miles a day in herds of about ten related adults and their offspring but in zoos are usually kept in pairs or even isolated in incredibly small enclosures compared to what they are used to in the wild. Elephants kept in zoos often show many signs of being mental distress and the average lifespan of elephants in zoos is around 16-18 years, instead of the 50-70 years they can live in the wild.


I’m just going to copy paste your response when people ask me what I’m going to school for. I’m very pro zoo and I want animals in their natural habitat just as much.

This is genuinely quite an interesting discussion.

mysharona1987: little-butch-crouton: severelynerdysheep: somehavegonemissing: spookyboyfelix: princess-nakamoto: mysharona1987: N...

habitat: THE POCKET ENCY CLOPEDIA OF INDOOR PLANTS IN COLOR A. Nicolaisen urdy, have 10 erect trunk with site,shieland holes. From the stems, large Philodendron scander Growth: Vigorous clim while very small on en leaves on long ield-like leaves unches of hanging aerial roots are formed. Older plants may, under favour Sweetheart Vine able conditions in conservatories or Habitat: West Indies. hothouses, develop large, calla-like G inforescences with white spathes. Later, with pointed, heart-shap s with dots and pale yellow and pale ultivated as a young plant and en. C carded when the bottom leaves are d, its value as an ornamental plant i s debatable e: Best in a warm greenhouse, o good in a room after careful har ing off. Thrives for a time in dee g off. Thom after caou but aromatic edible fruits appear, which de. Requires a lot of space. 1S grow to lengths of 30 cr have a taste similar to that of a pine- specimens. New leave brown and almost trans Use: Decorative room plant, requiring a lot of space. Suitable for trellising to l: Soilless mixture or light leaf mould ding: 3 grams per litre (1 oz. per ter: Should be kept moist all the year ht: Never direct sunlight. Thrives in Use: Well suited as cli alls, doorways and large windows. Soil: Soilless mixture with added peat. pH Feeding: 3 gram gallon) every Fertiliser sh moist soil trellises or walls or as a plant, also as a ground rvatories. An amusin s to allow the pla enveloped in mois soil on) every week (March-October). nd. Will not stand drying out. dy rooms, halls or staircases. t: Poor growth if temperature falls w minimum 15° C. (60° F.) during er st attractive and amount in t ss mixture rams per Frequent spraying. especially in lit positions, the spots and edges. Heat: Normal room temp not less than 12° C. (55° F Air: Syringe during gro up to very good centrall he Re-potting: Every 3 orA years Propagation: By cuttig top shoots with the aerial roots atta hed. They should be planted in equal arts of soilless mi:x ее ai otting: Every spring, in spacious agation: By cuttings in a green in an enclosed atmosphere, with e Mealy bug, red spider mite ially when the growing point is ri it e and sand, and must be kept moist and warm Varieties: borsig ina (but correctly Monstera pertus, which has smaller eaves and mor aerial roots than the type, and grows ore rapidly and vigor- ously. Can al be used in smaller rooms. This is e variety illustrated. NOTE: Aerial pots, which--like ordin ary rootss ve as ducts for transmit The sap in the leaves and stems is nous varieties: There are many hybrids this and other species with a variation in the distribution of en rs in the leaves. See also below. enbachia leopoldii
habitat: THE POCKET
 ENCY CLOPEDIA OF
 INDOOR PLANTS
 IN COLOR
 A. Nicolaisen

 urdy,
 have
 10
 erect trunk with
 site,shieland holes. From the stems, large Philodendron scander
 Growth: Vigorous clim
 while very small on
 en leaves on long
 ield-like leaves
 unches of hanging aerial roots are
 formed. Older plants may, under favour Sweetheart Vine
 able conditions in conservatories or Habitat: West Indies.
 hothouses, develop large, calla-like G
 inforescences with white spathes. Later, with pointed, heart-shap
 s with dots and
 pale yellow and pale
 ultivated as a young plant and
 en. C
 carded when the bottom leaves are
 d, its value as an ornamental plant i
 s debatable
 e: Best in a warm greenhouse,
 o good in a room after careful har
 ing off. Thrives for a time in dee
 g off. Thom after caou but aromatic edible fruits appear, which
 de. Requires a lot of space.
 1S
 grow to lengths of 30 cr
 have a taste similar to that of a pine-
 specimens. New leave
 brown and almost trans
 Use: Decorative room plant, requiring a
 lot of space. Suitable for trellising to
 l: Soilless mixture or light leaf mould
 ding: 3 grams per litre (1 oz. per
 ter: Should be kept moist all the year
 ht: Never direct sunlight. Thrives in
 Use: Well suited as cli
 alls, doorways and large windows.
 Soil: Soilless mixture
 with added peat. pH
 Feeding: 3 gram
 gallon) every
 Fertiliser sh
 moist soil
 trellises or walls or as a
 plant, also as a ground
 rvatories. An amusin
 s to allow the pla
 enveloped in mois
 soil
 on) every week (March-October).
 nd. Will not stand drying out.
 dy rooms, halls or staircases.
 t: Poor growth if temperature falls
 w minimum 15° C. (60° F.) during
 er
 st attractive and
 amount in t
 ss mixture
 rams per
 Frequent spraying. especially in
 lit positions, the
 spots and edges.
 Heat: Normal room temp
 not less than 12° C. (55° F
 Air: Syringe during gro
 up to very good centrall he
 Re-potting: Every 3 orA years
 Propagation: By cuttig top shoots with
 the aerial roots atta hed. They should
 be planted in equal arts of soilless mi:x
 ее
 ai
 otting: Every spring, in spacious
 agation:
 By cuttings in a green
 in an enclosed atmosphere, with
 e
 Mealy bug, red spider mite
 ially when the growing point is
 ri
 it
 e and sand, and must be kept moist
 and warm
 Varieties: borsig ina (but correctly
 Monstera pertus, which has smaller
 eaves and mor aerial roots than the
 type, and grows ore rapidly and vigor-
 ously. Can al be used in smaller
 rooms. This is e variety illustrated.
 NOTE: Aerial pots, which--like ordin
 ary rootss ve as ducts for transmit
 The sap in the leaves and stems is
 nous
 varieties: There are many hybrids
 this and other species with a
 variation in the distribution of
 en
 rs in the leaves. See also below.
 enbachia leopoldii
habitat: . Outdoor cats face danger from cars, disease, predators and cruel humans Domestic cats DO NOT belong outdoors as they're not a natural part of our ecosystem. They're a genetically modified species & a non-native, invasive predator Cats kill up to 3.7 billion birds 20.7 billion mammals, 800 million lizards and 300 million frogs every year. . Domestic pets like dogs & ferrets & even exotic pets like snakes & lizards do not roam free & hunt outside. Why should cats? A 2011 study indicates that cats have caused the extinction of 33 species of birds, mammals and reptiles kaijutegu: fantasticbeastsandhowtokeepthem: wildlife-rehabilitator: hotcommunist: withgoldenfire: hotcommunist: findchaos: wildlife-rehabilitator: Some of you may have seen my reply to a post and the ask I received about outdoor cats, so here is a little infographic about outdoor cats. Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cast outside. No exceptions. Nope, I don’t care if Muffles is super-special and adventurous. Nope, still don’t care that it’s different where you live. Please refer to the original bullet points.  (*gets ready to hit ‘Block’ on a thousand angry cat owners*) this is a mess have you gobshites genuinely never fucking heard of farm cats jesus wept, if i never see another fucking townie animal rights activist it’ll be too fucking soon. the current political system we live under doesn’t give a fuck about nature. wildlife charities have had a huge downward swoop in donations due to the recession caused by the powers that be, fracking is being done on national parks and nature reserves, roads are hastily built through wildlife rich areas and adequate warning signage is not provided… but no, it’s us ordinary people and our pesky outdoor cats that are the cause of…extinct….species…? really? is this the hill u want to die on OP??? get back 2 me I’m not refuting that humans kill far more animals than cats do, but over a billion animals are killed annually in the US by outdoor cats. That’s also a huge problem. I’m also aware that wildlife rescue organizations are losing donations - I’m the vice president and co-founder of a 501©(3) non-profit organization and not only do we scrape by on small donations while dozens of animals come in a month, many of which are injured by cats. We just had to euthanize a yearling squirrel because it was mauled by a cat and had full hind-end paralysis from the attack. Believe me, I understand. “An estimated 60 to 88 million cats are owned in the US and an estimated 60 million more are feral… While loss of habitat is the primary cause of extinction, cats are responsible for the extinction of 33 species of birds worldwide. Cats kill an estimated 480 million birds per year (assuming eight birds killed per feral cat per year.)” That is a grossly conservative number, and only accounts for feral cats, not outdoor pets. And that’s just birds. Plus the other wildlife that are killed by cats annually. Here’s another resource, a smaller scale research program called Kitty Cams: “Hunting cats captured an average of 2 items during seven days of roaming. Carolina anoles (small lizards) were the most common prey species followed by Woodland Voles (small mammals). Only one of the vertebrates captured was a non-native species (a House Mouse).” From the same group: “44% of cats were witnessed stalking or chasing prey; 30% captured wildlife.” An article from Mental Floss, sources listed at the bottom of the article:  “84 million House cats in the United States 4 to 18 Birds killed by a typical house cat every year 8 to 21 Small mammals killed by a typical house cat every year 30 million to 80 million Free-roaming, feral cats estimated to be living in the United States. They either survive alone or live in colonies. In Washington, D.C., for example, there are estimated to be some 300 outdoor cat colonies. 23 to 46 Birds killed by each feral cat every year 129 to 338 Small mammals killed by each feral cat every year 1.4 billion to 3.7 billion Total birds killed by America’s cats every year 15 Percentage of all bird deaths estimated to come at the hands — er, paws — of cats 6.9 billion to 20.7 billion Total small mammals killed by cats every year” From a report on ABC News: “Cats are responsible for the deaths of 1.4 to 3.7 billion birds and 6.9 to 20.7 billion mammals every year, according to research conducted by the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.” From the American Bird Conservancy: “If we extrapolate the results of this study across the country and include feral cats, we find that cats are likely killing more than 4 billion animals per year, including at least 500 million birds.” (Also you’re putting your cat in unnecessary danger from tons of different threats by letting them outside unsupervised. So even if you don’t wanna give a shit about wildlife, maybe try giving a shit about your cat’s health life.) (Also farm cats are often not treated well, not provided with proper veterinary care, and there are other options for rodent control that doesn’t put other wildlife in as much danger) also consider: this is 100% something that you, as an individual, can do to mitigate some of the natural disaster that is the anthropocene. We’re on track to lose something like 80% of global biodiversity by the end of the century, and there’s almost nothing that your average citizen can do about it. But keeping your cats inside to help preserve local biodiversity and mitigating the damage that ferals do is actually something that you can do. 
habitat: . Outdoor cats face danger
 from cars, disease, predators
 and cruel humans
 Domestic cats DO NOT
 belong outdoors as they're
 not a natural part of our
 ecosystem. They're a
 genetically modified species
 & a non-native, invasive
 predator
 Cats kill up to 3.7 billion birds
 20.7 billion mammals,
 800 million lizards and 300
 million frogs every year.
 . Domestic pets like dogs
 & ferrets & even exotic pets
 like snakes & lizards do not
 roam free & hunt outside.
 Why should cats?
 A 2011 study indicates
 that cats have caused the
 extinction of 33 species of
 birds, mammals and reptiles
kaijutegu:

fantasticbeastsandhowtokeepthem:

wildlife-rehabilitator:

hotcommunist:

withgoldenfire:

hotcommunist:

findchaos:

wildlife-rehabilitator:

Some of you may have seen my reply to a post and the ask I received about outdoor cats, so here is a little infographic about outdoor cats.

Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cats outside.Don’t let your cast outside.
No exceptions. Nope, I don’t care if Muffles is super-special and adventurous. Nope, still don’t care that it’s different where you live. Please refer to the original bullet points. 
(*gets ready to hit ‘Block’ on a thousand angry cat owners*)

this is a mess

have you gobshites genuinely never fucking heard of farm cats jesus wept, if i never see another fucking townie animal rights activist it’ll be too fucking soon.

the current political system we live under doesn’t give a fuck about nature. wildlife charities have had a huge downward swoop in donations due to the recession caused by the powers that be, fracking is being done on national parks and nature reserves, roads are hastily built through wildlife rich areas and adequate warning signage is not provided…
but no, it’s us ordinary people and our pesky outdoor cats that are the cause of…extinct….species…? really? is this the hill u want to die on OP??? get back 2 me


I’m not refuting that humans kill far more animals than cats do, but over a billion animals are killed annually in the US by outdoor cats. That’s also a huge problem. I’m also aware that wildlife rescue organizations are losing donations - I’m the vice president and co-founder of a 501©(3) non-profit organization and not only do we scrape by on small donations while dozens of animals come in a month, many of which are injured by cats. We just had to euthanize a yearling squirrel because it was mauled by a cat and had full hind-end paralysis from the attack. Believe me, I understand.
“An estimated 60 to 88 million cats are owned in the US and an estimated 60 million more are feral… While loss of habitat is the primary cause of extinction, cats are responsible for the extinction of 33 species of birds worldwide. Cats kill an estimated 480 million birds per year (assuming eight birds killed per feral cat per year.)” That is a grossly conservative number, and only accounts for feral cats, not outdoor pets. And that’s just birds. Plus the other wildlife that are killed by cats annually.
Here’s another resource, a smaller scale research program called Kitty Cams: “Hunting cats captured an average of 2 items during seven days of roaming. Carolina anoles (small lizards) were the most common prey species followed by Woodland Voles (small mammals). Only one of the vertebrates captured was a non-native species (a House Mouse).” From the same group: “44% of cats were
witnessed stalking or
chasing prey; 30% captured
wildlife.”


An article from Mental Floss, sources listed at the bottom of the article: 


“84 million House cats in the United States
4 to 18 Birds killed by a typical house cat every year
8 to 21 Small mammals killed by a typical house cat every year
30 million to 80 million Free-roaming, feral cats estimated to be living in the United States. They either survive alone or live in colonies. In Washington, D.C., for example, there are estimated to be some 300 outdoor cat colonies.
23 to 46 Birds killed by each feral cat every year
129 to 338 Small mammals killed by each feral cat every year
1.4 billion to 3.7 billion Total birds killed by America’s cats every year
15 Percentage of all bird deaths estimated to come at the hands — er, paws — of cats
6.9 billion to 20.7 billion Total small mammals killed by cats every year”
From a report on ABC News: “Cats are responsible for the deaths of 1.4 to 3.7 billion birds and 6.9 to 20.7 billion mammals every year, according to research conducted by the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.”


From the American Bird Conservancy: “If we extrapolate the results of this study across the country and include feral cats, we find that cats are likely killing more than 4 billion animals per year, including at least 500 million birds.” 



(Also you’re putting your cat in unnecessary danger from tons of different threats by letting them outside unsupervised. So even if you don’t wanna give a shit about wildlife, maybe try giving a shit about your cat’s health  life.)
(Also farm cats are often not treated well, not provided with proper veterinary care, and there are other options for rodent control that doesn’t put other wildlife in as much danger)

also consider: this is 100% something that you, as an individual, can do to mitigate some of the natural disaster that is the anthropocene. We’re on track to lose something like 80% of global biodiversity by the end of the century, and there’s almost nothing that your average citizen can do about it. But keeping your cats inside to help preserve local biodiversity and mitigating the damage that ferals do is actually something that you can do. 

kaijutegu: fantasticbeastsandhowtokeepthem: wildlife-rehabilitator: hotcommunist: withgoldenfire: hotcommunist: findchaos: wildlif...

habitat: nncharlesz: monobeartheater: ripppedfuel: thelightofnight: nicoffeine: OH MY GOSH I have two hands and three foods. Oh poor little dude I HAVE NEVER SEEN AN ANIMAL LOOK MORE DISTRESSED Okay, head’s up. This little critter is called a slow loris. NEVER TAKE ONE AS A PET. They’ve experienced a boom in popularity as pets in parts of Asia and then the rest of the world, and this is not okay.  Why? A) They’re endangered B) They’re venomous. The only known venomous primate, to be exact. They store it in their inner arms.They’ll get in defensive posture, suck the venom from their glands, and them bite. And the bite can kill a human. (Seriously, one nipped Lady Gaga in Feb 2014 when she thought it would be a good idea to use one in a music video. They dropped that idea, thankfully.) C) They’re endangered directly BECAUSE OF THE EXOTIC PET TRADE D) When the poachers trap them, THEY CLIP THEIR FUCKING TEETH TO MAKE THEM “MANAGEABLE.” Many slow loris’ will die before ever being sold because of complications with HAVING THEIR FUCKING TEETH CLIPPED. (There’s a reason the loris’ in the videos are only eating soft foods…) E) The exotic pet trade on slow loris’ BOOMed because of youtube videos like the one above. You wanna help these adorable looking critters? International Animal Rescue: ‘Adopt’ a Slow Loris Little Fireface Project And please make it very clear to everyone who thinks these videos are cute, that the animal in question has been stolen from it’s natural habitat and horrifically abused just so it could be a “cute” pet.
habitat: nncharlesz:

monobeartheater:

ripppedfuel:

thelightofnight:

nicoffeine:

OH MY GOSH

I have two hands and three foods.

Oh poor little dude

I HAVE NEVER SEEN AN ANIMAL LOOK MORE DISTRESSED

Okay, head’s up. This little critter is called a slow loris. NEVER TAKE ONE AS A PET. They’ve experienced a boom in popularity as pets in parts of Asia and then the rest of the world, and this is not okay. 
Why?
A) They’re endangered
B) They’re venomous. The only known venomous primate, to be exact. They store it in their inner arms.They’ll get in defensive posture, suck the venom from their glands, and them bite. And the bite can kill a human. (Seriously, one nipped Lady Gaga in Feb 2014 when she thought it would be a good idea to use one in a music video. They dropped that idea, thankfully.)
C) They’re endangered directly BECAUSE OF THE EXOTIC PET TRADE
D) When the poachers trap them, THEY CLIP THEIR FUCKING TEETH TO MAKE THEM “MANAGEABLE.” Many slow loris’ will die before ever being sold because of complications with HAVING THEIR FUCKING TEETH CLIPPED. (There’s a reason the loris’ in the videos are only eating soft foods…)
E) The exotic pet trade on slow loris’ BOOMed because of youtube videos like the one above.
You wanna help these adorable looking critters?
International Animal Rescue: ‘Adopt’ a Slow Loris
Little Fireface Project
And please make it very clear to everyone who thinks these videos are cute, that the animal in question has been stolen from it’s natural habitat and horrifically abused just so it could be a “cute” pet.

nncharlesz: monobeartheater: ripppedfuel: thelightofnight: nicoffeine: OH MY GOSH I have two hands and three foods. Oh poor little...

habitat: oo Verizon 2:03 PM Q Search Heathans Dan Yesterday at 10:08 AM- Today at work I found some Wild Corndogs growing in their natural habitat. This was real exciting for me as I have never picked fresh corndogs before, but I have no idea how to tel when they are ripe as they tasted horrible no matter how much mustard I put on them 22.5K Shares Like Share News Feed Requests Messenger Notifications More prancingtrashcan: cynicowl: randomdaisy: limbovulture: @randomdaisy dear herbologist what the fok is this corn dog plant OH MY GOODNESS I SAW THIS ON TWITTER AND I WAS LIKE “OH NO…. DUDE… DUDE NO” this plant is, in fact, a cattail (Typha genus, probably either Typha latifolia or Typha angustifolia). what’s ironic about this person’s encounter is that almost every single part of the cattail is edible– the rhizomes are starchy and, although tough, can be made into a nutritious flour; the stems can be peeled and used like asparagus; the pollen can be gathered and used to extend or supplement flour; and even the green flower spikes can be boiled and eaten like corn-on-the-cob, so this person sort of had the right idea. the thing is, what this person has in their photo is a BROWN flower spike, meaning that it’s starting to go to seed and is probably a tasteless mouthful of either fiber or fluff. regardless of whether the post is a joke or serious, out of all the edible parts of the cattail, op managed to pick one of the ONLY parts of the plant that isn’t. and i still can’t get over that. As a side note, rubbing that part of the plant makes an absolutely ridiculous amount of fluff come out (which is how it disperses the seeds). I highly recommend it but it’s probably best to do that when no one else is around are you saying i can jack off this plant and it will nut
habitat: oo Verizon
 2:03 PM
 Q Search
 Heathans Dan
 Yesterday at 10:08 AM-
 Today at work I found some Wild Corndogs growing in their
 natural habitat. This was real exciting for me as I have never
 picked fresh corndogs before, but I have no idea how to tel
 when they are ripe as they tasted horrible no matter how
 much mustard I put on them
 22.5K Shares
 Like
 Share
 News Feed
 Requests
 Messenger
 Notifications
 More
prancingtrashcan:


cynicowl:

randomdaisy:

limbovulture:

@randomdaisy dear herbologist what the fok is this corn dog plant

OH MY GOODNESS I SAW THIS ON TWITTER AND I WAS LIKE “OH NO…. DUDE… DUDE NO”


this plant is, in fact, a cattail (Typha genus, probably either Typha latifolia or Typha angustifolia).  what’s ironic about this person’s encounter is that almost every single part of the cattail is edible– the rhizomes are starchy and, although tough, can be made into a nutritious flour; the stems can be peeled and used like asparagus; the pollen can be gathered and used to extend or supplement flour; and even the green flower spikes can be boiled and eaten like corn-on-the-cob, so this person sort of had the right idea.


the thing is, what this person has in their photo is a BROWN flower spike, meaning that it’s starting to go to seed and is probably a tasteless mouthful of either fiber or fluff.  regardless of whether the post is a joke or serious, out of all the edible parts of the cattail, op managed to pick one of the ONLY parts of the plant that isn’t.  and i still can’t get over that. 

As a side note, rubbing that part of the plant makes an absolutely ridiculous amount of fluff come out (which is how it disperses the seeds). I highly recommend it but it’s probably best to do that when no one else is around





are you saying i can jack off this plant and it will nut

prancingtrashcan: cynicowl: randomdaisy: limbovulture: @randomdaisy dear herbologist what the fok is this corn dog plant OH MY GOOD...

habitat: brucebannersbadmanners It occurred to me that the T-rex (we really need an official name for her) from the original Jurassic Park only killed one human in the movie, and it was that shitty lawyer who abandoned the kids anyway, so he had it coming. She wasn't in the second or third film as those took place on the other island. She was, however, in Jurassic World where (spoilers) she saved everyone's asses, JUST like she did at the end of the first film. So let's do a tally here. Humans Killed: 1 Humans Saved: 8 + 1 velociraptor In conclusion the T-rex is the real protagonist of the series thank you. raptorix Of course!! She was the pride and joy of the park. She probably had an audience when she hatched. She imprinted on people, not dinosaurs. Her whole life she was given her proteins handed to her, she has never had to really hunt to survive. She is like a captive-bred tiger. She probably had favorite human handlers. She could tell which humans were the nasty one Reframe the movie where Rexy (that's what l'm calling her) is just as scared as the humans that the power went out, that things were falling apart. She was exploring outside her habitat. She wanted to play with the jeeps. Maybe she wanted to help get the small human out of jeep? Be free, tiny humans! Come back, tiny humans! Don't fall off the cliff, tiny humans! The lawyer smelled bad. Rexy really disliked his smell. He tried to hide it on the toilet, but her nose easily found him. He didn't taste as good as goat, though. His stinky clothes gave her a stomach ache for days. Rexy tried to figure out where the humans went. She found them at the visitors center. And when she got there, a rude raptor wanted to pick a fight with her. No! Get off my bak. What is this thing falling on me??? Someone bring me a goat I'm hungry True Protagonist
habitat: brucebannersbadmanners
 It occurred to me that the T-rex (we really need an official
 name for her) from the original Jurassic Park only killed one
 human in the movie, and it was that shitty lawyer who
 abandoned the kids anyway, so he had it coming. She wasn't
 in the second or third film as those took place on the other
 island. She was, however, in Jurassic World where (spoilers)
 she saved everyone's asses, JUST like she did at the end of
 the first film. So let's do a tally here.
 Humans Killed: 1
 Humans Saved: 8 + 1 velociraptor
 In conclusion the T-rex is the real protagonist of the series
 thank you.
 raptorix
 Of course!!
 She was the pride and joy of the park. She probably had an
 audience when she hatched. She imprinted on people, not
 dinosaurs. Her whole life she was given her proteins handed
 to her, she has never had to really hunt to survive. She is like
 a captive-bred tiger. She probably had favorite human
 handlers. She could tell which humans were the nasty one
 Reframe the movie where Rexy (that's what l'm calling her) is
 just as scared as the humans that the power went out, that
 things were falling apart.
 She was exploring outside her habitat. She wanted to play
 with the jeeps. Maybe she wanted to help get the small
 human out of jeep? Be free, tiny humans! Come back, tiny
 humans! Don't fall off the cliff, tiny humans!
 The lawyer smelled bad. Rexy really disliked his smell. He
 tried to hide it on the toilet, but her nose easily found him. He
 didn't taste as good as goat, though. His stinky clothes gave
 her a stomach ache for days.
 Rexy tried to figure out where the humans went. She found
 them at the visitors center. And when she got there, a rude
 raptor wanted to pick a fight with her. No! Get off my bak.
 What is this thing falling on me??? Someone bring me a goat
 I'm hungry
True Protagonist

True Protagonist

habitat: Seadog in natural habitat. We have these on land too, but we call them land seadogs.
habitat: Seadog in natural habitat. We have these on land too, but we call them land seadogs.

Seadog in natural habitat. We have these on land too, but we call them land seadogs.