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Crime, Bears, and Best: U.S. Code> Title 18> Part I> Chapter 115 S 2381 Traitor Law and Legal Definition 18 U.S. Code 2381 Treason US Code Notes A person who is guilty of treason is known as a traitor. Treason is punishable by death if a traitor levies war against his state or country or supports its enemies, giving them aid and comfort. A traitor shall be convicted on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in an open court. pr next Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war aga comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 807; Pub. L. 103-322, title XXXIII, S 330016(2)(), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2148.) them or adhe to their enemies, giving them aid and l'he U.S. impeachment process can result in the removal but not the criminal punishment - of a U.S. public official who would cause substantial harm: "The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribe or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors." U.S. Const. Art. II The special phrase "high Crimes and Misdemeanors" is lifted directly from ancient British impeachment law and forms the cornerstone of the U.S. impeachment process. It is a term (legally, a "term of art") that bears no resemblance to what we know as "crimes" or "misdemeanors" today, It requires no charging of a crime, no intent to do a wrong, and no lawbreaking. When presenting a case for impeachment, Congress may charge civil officers as acting with intent, treachery, criminal misconduct, and law-breaking, but the Constitution requires no proof of such none -in order to mpeach ec 61 Ford said: We best capture the meaning of the phrase "high... Misdemeanors" when we think ofit as referring to breaches of fiduciary duty. High misdemeanors are not limited to commission of crimes, but they do not include mere political differences. While violations of the criminal law provide grounds for impeachment, high misdemeanors encompass breaches of the duties of loyalty, good faith, and care and of the obligations to account and to follow instructions (including the law and Constitution) when administering one's office. What, then, is an impeachable offense? The only honest answer is that an impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history conviction results from whatever offense or offenses two-thirds of the other body considers to be sufficiently serious to require removal of the accused from office ....
Crime, Bears, and Best: U.S. Code> Title 18> Part I> Chapter 115 S 2381
 Traitor Law and Legal Definition
 18 U.S. Code 2381 Treason
 US Code
 Notes
 A person who is guilty of treason is known as a traitor. Treason is
 punishable by death if a traitor levies war against his state or
 country or supports its enemies, giving them aid and comfort. A
 traitor shall be convicted on the testimony of two witnesses to the
 same overt act, or on confession in an open court.
 pr
 next
 Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war
 aga
 comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of
 treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less
 than five years and fined under this title but not less than
 $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the
 United States
 (June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 807; Pub. L. 103-322, title
 XXXIII, S 330016(2)(), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2148.)
 them or adhe
 to their enemies, giving them aid and
 l'he U.S. impeachment process can result in the removal but
 not the criminal punishment - of a U.S. public official who
 would cause substantial harm: "The President, Vice President
 and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from
 Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribe
 or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors." U.S. Const. Art. II
 The special phrase "high Crimes and Misdemeanors" is lifted
 directly from ancient British impeachment law and forms the
 cornerstone of the U.S. impeachment process. It is a term
 (legally, a "term of art") that bears no resemblance to what we
 know as "crimes" or "misdemeanors" today, It requires no
 charging of a crime, no intent to do a wrong, and no
 lawbreaking. When presenting a case for impeachment,
 Congress may charge civil officers as acting with intent,
 treachery, criminal misconduct, and law-breaking, but the
 Constitution requires no proof of such none -in order to
 mpeach
 ec
 61 Ford said:
 We best capture the meaning of the phrase "high... Misdemeanors" when we think
 ofit as referring to breaches of fiduciary duty. High misdemeanors are not limited to
 commission of crimes, but they do not include mere political differences. While
 violations of the criminal law provide grounds for impeachment, high
 misdemeanors encompass breaches of the duties of loyalty, good faith, and care
 and of the obligations to account and to follow instructions (including the law and
 Constitution) when administering one's office.
 What, then, is an impeachable offense? The only honest answer is that
 an impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of
 Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history
 conviction results from whatever offense or offenses two-thirds of the
 other body considers to be sufficiently serious to require removal of the
 accused from office
 ....