Https
Https

Https

Disowned
Disowned

Disowned

The
The

The

Disowne
Disowne

Disowne

black person
 black person

black person

you there
 you there

you there

scatter
 scatter

scatter

faces
 faces

faces

feb
 feb

feb

days
 days

days

🔥 | Latest

diaspora: OUL vladislava: mylistofthangs: Antique Jewish wedding rings.  These are absolutely gorgeous. Some info: Antique Jewish wedding bands are stellar examples of the artistry of jewelry making. The rings are made of a metal circle, molded to fit the would-be owner, topped with an architectural feature resembling a house. The goldsmith would then engrave something on the exterior of the “house”; engravings were also commonly hidden inside, in which case the “house” – or bezel – would slide open. The engraving would usually read Mazal Tov, or the Hebrew initials M.T. The rings’ houses varied in design from castle-like, to square, round or hexagonal. The structures were representations of either the Holy Temple or synagogues in the diaspora. Large in diameter and heavy due to the architectural features, many of the rings are practically unwearable. Morgan ponders the question as well, saying that there is no conclusive evidence, either in Jewish tradition or in the Christian documentation recording Jewish practices, of such rings ever having been worn. Trading in gold, jewels and precious stones was the trade of choice by wealthy Jewish merchants for hundreds of years. The memoir portrait of Gluckel of Hamlen, the daughter of a gold merchant of those times, depicts a wedding ring embroidered in gold thread, hanging from a necklace, which may have been the way the rings were worn after the wedding ceremony.  Jewish wedding bands are unique and although many of them are magnificent and expensive, none have stones set in them. The rings are devoid of their classical focal point due to a rabbinical ordinance barring setting gemstones in wedding bands, or engraving them with hallmarks – the latter first appearing in the 19th century. Also, Jewish goldsmiths were not allowed to join guilds and mark their creations until circa that time. (via)
diaspora: OUL
vladislava:

mylistofthangs:

Antique Jewish wedding rings. 

These are absolutely gorgeous.
Some info:

Antique Jewish wedding bands are stellar examples of the artistry of jewelry making. The rings are made of a metal circle, molded to fit the would-be owner, topped with an architectural feature resembling a house. The goldsmith would then engrave something on the exterior of the “house”; engravings were also commonly hidden inside, in which case the “house” – or bezel – would slide open. The engraving would usually read Mazal Tov, or the Hebrew initials M.T.

The rings’ houses varied in design from castle-like, to square, round or hexagonal. The structures were representations of either the Holy Temple or synagogues in the diaspora.
Large in diameter and heavy due to the architectural features, many of the rings are practically unwearable. Morgan ponders the question as well, saying that there is no conclusive evidence, either in Jewish tradition or in the Christian documentation recording Jewish practices, of such rings ever having been worn.
Trading in gold, jewels and precious stones was the trade of choice by wealthy Jewish merchants for hundreds of years. The memoir portrait of Gluckel of Hamlen, the daughter of a gold merchant of those times, depicts a wedding ring embroidered in gold thread, hanging from a necklace, which may have been the way the rings were worn after the wedding ceremony. 
Jewish wedding bands are unique and although many of them are magnificent and expensive, none have stones set in them. The rings are devoid of their classical focal point due to a rabbinical ordinance barring setting gemstones in wedding bands, or engraving them with hallmarks – the latter first appearing in the 19th century. Also, Jewish goldsmiths were not allowed to join guilds and mark their creations until circa that time. (via)

vladislava: mylistofthangs: Antique Jewish wedding rings.  These are absolutely gorgeous. Some info: Antique Jewish wedding bands are...

diaspora: strongblacklead Liked by chance_perdomo and 8,854 others strongblacklead A warlock with the face of an angel. @chance-perdomo #caos Comments bigbrotherzook He ain't black 5d 1 like Reply Hide replies chance-perdomo # @bigbrotherzook Sorry my lack of gold chains & grills are misleading to your limited concept of blackness 5d 406 likes Reply View previous replies (26) bigbrotherzook @duffboy3 i could care less about how "black" he is but he isn't lol.. that all I'm saying 5d Reply colorsandfruit @bigbrotherzook u can't tell anyone how black they are. If you have African DNA and a black parent then you are black period. U commenting on his blackness means nothing because his hair strands say black. This whole thread is you justifying how he isn't black when you could be using your energy somewhere else. No matter what you say he's perceived as black and has a black parent so he's black. It's not a matter of opinion it's fact. r U might as well delete your comment because you're gonna continue to be dragged. 5d 23 likes Reply bigbrotherzook @colorsandfruit girl shit up and stay in a woman's place, this does not concern you. 5d 1 like Reply chance_perdomo Alrighty, imma just get it out of the way. "Chains & grills" comment was supposed to be in poor taste 1: this is the stereotype perpetuated by societal remnants of archaic colonial- thinking. There is no set "book- cover" with which to judge the African diaspora & their descendants 2: @bigbrotherzook 's comments shit on & divide members of the community much like the "colonial masters" would want. THE CYCLE PERPETUATES Prove my Blackness? it's Very reminiscent of Trump's obsession with Obama's Birth certificate, no? clear something up for you: I AM a Black child, raised by a Latina Mother, educated in a VERY white society. Always one of 5 "black kids" in all of my schools. Seen as black by their community, seen as white in my own cause I didn't "act black", had lighter pigmentation & didn't do the dance the colonial masters would have wanted. For refusing to perpetuate poisonous ideologies & archaic beliefs. Call me biracial by all means, it's really no sweat off my back - imma do me, be me & you can call me whatever helps you sleep better. What I have qualms with is your divisive mentality perpetuating the problem. & please don't ever disrespect a woman not even in the comments Not only is that shitty as a Man...but it perpetuates the "black men ain't shit" narrative. 4d 94 likes Reply ambrosechance:
diaspora: strongblacklead
 Liked by chance_perdomo and 8,854 others
 strongblacklead A warlock with the face of an angel.
 @chance-perdomo #caos

 Comments
 bigbrotherzook He ain't black
 5d 1 like Reply
 Hide replies
 chance-perdomo #
 @bigbrotherzook Sorry my lack of
 gold chains & grills are misleading
 to your limited concept of blackness
 5d 406 likes Reply

 View previous replies (26)
 bigbrotherzook @duffboy3 i could
 care less about how "black" he is
 but he isn't lol.. that all I'm saying
 5d Reply
 colorsandfruit @bigbrotherzook u
 can't tell anyone how black they
 are. If you have African DNA and a
 black parent then you are black
 period. U commenting on his
 blackness means nothing because
 his hair strands say black. This
 whole thread is you justifying how
 he isn't black when you could be
 using your energy somewhere else.
 No matter what you say he's
 perceived as black and has a black
 parent so he's black. It's not a
 matter of opinion it's fact. r U
 might as well delete your comment
 because you're gonna continue to
 be dragged.
 5d 23 likes Reply
 bigbrotherzook @colorsandfruit girl
 shit up and stay in a woman's place,
 this does not concern you.
 5d 1 like Reply

 chance_perdomo Alrighty, imma
 just get it out of the way. "Chains &
 grills" comment was supposed to
 be in poor taste 1: this is the
 stereotype perpetuated by societal
 remnants of archaic colonial-
 thinking. There is no set "book-
 cover" with which to judge the
 African diaspora & their
 descendants
 2: @bigbrotherzook 's comments
 shit on & divide members of the
 community much like the "colonial
 masters" would want. THE
 CYCLE PERPETUATES Prove
 my Blackness? it's Very reminiscent
 of Trump's obsession with Obama's
 Birth certificate, no?
 clear something up for you: I AM a
 Black child, raised by a Latina
 Mother, educated in a VERY white
 society. Always one of 5 "black
 kids" in all of my schools. Seen as
 black by their community, seen as
 white in my own cause I didn't "act
 black", had lighter pigmentation &
 didn't do the dance the colonial
 masters would have wanted. For
 refusing to perpetuate poisonous
 ideologies & archaic beliefs. Call me
 biracial by all means, it's really no
 sweat off my back - imma do me,
 be me & you can call me whatever
 helps you sleep better. What I have
 qualms with is your divisive

 mentality perpetuating the problem.
 & please don't ever disrespect a
 woman not even in the comments
 Not only is that shitty as a Man...but
 it perpetuates the "black men ain't
 shit" narrative.
 4d 94 likes Reply
ambrosechance:

ambrosechance:

diaspora: I wasn't called racist until I start expressing how much I appreciate black girls Deep down this resonates with all women of African diaspora reading this. Maybe all women, as all women are oppressed to varying degrees. This resonates because love is the deepest & highest vibration within our lives. So why do African women give the most but receive the least globally? Many reasons, racism & sexism being two of them. African women are so brilliant & so beautiful that the insecure men of the world feel the need to control them. I have spent the time in Ethiopia speaking to women whenever I could. I asked them all the same Question. "What's it like to be an African woman in this world?" All said that it's hard because if they "look good" they are judged on their "looks" not on the content of their character. If they don't "look good" then there are less opportunities for them economically. Either way it's a struggle because men own basically everything. Military Banks Schools Food Water Media Music Law Land Business Politics Medicine Literature and even the "Beauty" industry... Men use every opportunity to oppress, profit from & downpress the woman. African women face racism from non Africans, Classism, colourism & Sexism from all. Women are generally more emotionally intelligent than men, they use the right brain & the left brain. Many men are conditioned & rewarded when they just use the left brain & the reptilian (order following, fight or flight brain So from birth women have been told something derogatory by men & by other women controlled by men. You have been told your life's purpose is to fit in & get a man for marriage. Men have been told your life's purpose is to excel & find a woman who supports your goals. I am writing this with gender privilege so more people will read this than if I was a woman. How I look is a bonus, but not my perceived soul contribution to the human experience. So I will use this platform to speak up for women. Working with women who are victims of oppression & sexual violence has shown me that women are generally better human beings than men. So love them properly, leave them room to grow and then support them. Respect chakabars
diaspora: I wasn't called racist until I start
 expressing how much I appreciate
 black girls
Deep down this resonates with all women of African diaspora reading this. Maybe all women, as all women are oppressed to varying degrees. This resonates because love is the deepest & highest vibration within our lives. So why do African women give the most but receive the least globally? Many reasons, racism & sexism being two of them. African women are so brilliant & so beautiful that the insecure men of the world feel the need to control them. I have spent the time in Ethiopia speaking to women whenever I could. I asked them all the same Question. "What's it like to be an African woman in this world?" All said that it's hard because if they "look good" they are judged on their "looks" not on the content of their character. If they don't "look good" then there are less opportunities for them economically. Either way it's a struggle because men own basically everything. Military Banks Schools Food Water Media Music Law Land Business Politics Medicine Literature and even the "Beauty" industry... Men use every opportunity to oppress, profit from & downpress the woman. African women face racism from non Africans, Classism, colourism & Sexism from all. Women are generally more emotionally intelligent than men, they use the right brain & the left brain. Many men are conditioned & rewarded when they just use the left brain & the reptilian (order following, fight or flight brain So from birth women have been told something derogatory by men & by other women controlled by men. You have been told your life's purpose is to fit in & get a man for marriage. Men have been told your life's purpose is to excel & find a woman who supports your goals. I am writing this with gender privilege so more people will read this than if I was a woman. How I look is a bonus, but not my perceived soul contribution to the human experience. So I will use this platform to speak up for women. Working with women who are victims of oppression & sexual violence has shown me that women are generally better human beings than men. So love them properly, leave them room to grow and then support them. Respect chakabars

Deep down this resonates with all women of African diaspora reading this. Maybe all women, as all women are oppressed to varying degrees....

diaspora: build, don't talk Miscommunication is the greatest distance between two people, between two cultures between a person and their culture, a people and their lands. So many of us have been scattered, so many of us are living out our lives where we don't belong. I'm talking about the Africans in diaspora, those who know that they are African but have never been back. Those who have a sense of belonging to a place that they have never been, may never get to. You know deep down that you don't belong in Europe, or the Americas, you might say that we moved there from Africa hundreds of years ago through trade and settled there peacefully. You might say that you were taken there by force, either way if you are African, African is your home. I know you are scared, many of us speak a colonised tongue, don't know our own cultures and if your ancestors were enslaved, as mine were, you might not know where in Africa you are from. But please if you can travel there, got to a place that you have never been but you are from. Sit down with your people there and eat food, learn the languages, learn the cultures, take your children there so they aren't scared of home. Make children there who will grow up in their culture amongst their people. Different cultures and languages should be celebrated not feared. It's okay that when the different birds all go down to the watering hole to drink, they all leave with the same birds that they came with. It's not division just the balance in which we were created. Africa is for Africans, I believe that. The only people who will say it is not, are people who aren't African and want a piece of Africa for themselves. All peoples should travel and drink together, but leave when you are finished unless you have been welcomed. Unless you are going to be useful to the people and the cultures of the lands. If you are African and reading this it's time to go and visit your home for the first time. Don't have fear in your heart, you should never fear home, the only people who have created a fear of your home are those who aren't supposed to be there... chakabars ❤️🖤💚
diaspora: build, don't talk
Miscommunication is the greatest distance between two people, between two cultures between a person and their culture, a people and their lands. So many of us have been scattered, so many of us are living out our lives where we don't belong. I'm talking about the Africans in diaspora, those who know that they are African but have never been back. Those who have a sense of belonging to a place that they have never been, may never get to. You know deep down that you don't belong in Europe, or the Americas, you might say that we moved there from Africa hundreds of years ago through trade and settled there peacefully. You might say that you were taken there by force, either way if you are African, African is your home. I know you are scared, many of us speak a colonised tongue, don't know our own cultures and if your ancestors were enslaved, as mine were, you might not know where in Africa you are from. But please if you can travel there, got to a place that you have never been but you are from. Sit down with your people there and eat food, learn the languages, learn the cultures, take your children there so they aren't scared of home. Make children there who will grow up in their culture amongst their people. Different cultures and languages should be celebrated not feared. It's okay that when the different birds all go down to the watering hole to drink, they all leave with the same birds that they came with. It's not division just the balance in which we were created. Africa is for Africans, I believe that. The only people who will say it is not, are people who aren't African and want a piece of Africa for themselves. All peoples should travel and drink together, but leave when you are finished unless you have been welcomed. Unless you are going to be useful to the people and the cultures of the lands. If you are African and reading this it's time to go and visit your home for the first time. Don't have fear in your heart, you should never fear home, the only people who have created a fear of your home are those who aren't supposed to be there... chakabars ❤️🖤💚

Miscommunication is the greatest distance between two people, between two cultures between a person and their culture, a people and their...

diaspora: Why do I like you? I don't have an answer for that but I guess it's just the vibes you give me, the smiles you put on my face, the laughs I get from talking to you, and just the fact that you can make me think of you even if we aren't talking at that moment. I honestly cannot say there's an answer to that, but I will say that you are the reason I am happy each and every day Miscommunication is the greatest distance between two people, between two cultures between a person and their culture, a people and their lands. So many of us have been scattered, so many of us are living out our lives where we don't belong. I'm talking about the Africans in diaspora, those who know that they are African but have never been back. Those who have a sense of belonging to a place that they have never been, may never get to. You know deep down that you don't belong in Europe, or the Americas, you might say that we moved there from Africa hundreds of years ago through trade and settled there peacefully. You might say that you were taken there by force, either way if you are African, African is your home. I know you are scared, many of us speak a colonised tongue, don't know our own cultures and if your ancestors were enslaved, as mine were, you might not know where in Africa you are from. But please if you can travel there, got to a place that you have never been but you are from. Sit down with your people there and eat food, learn the languages, learn the cultures, take your children there so they aren't scared of home. Make children there who will grow up in their culture amongst their people. Different cultures and languages should be celebrated not feared. It's okay that when the different birds all go down to the watering hole to drink, they all leave with the same birds that they came with. It's not division just the balance in which we were created. Africa is for Africans, I believe that. The only people who will say it is not, are people who aren't African and want a piece of Africa for themselves. All peoples should travel and drink together, but leave when you are finished unless you have been welcomed. Unless you are going to be useful to the people and the cultures of the lands. If you are African and reading this it's time to go and visit your home for the first time. Don't have fear in your heart, you should never fear home, the only people who have created a fear of your home are those who aren't supposed to be there... chakabars
diaspora: Why do I like you?
 I don't have an answer for that
 but I guess it's just the vibes you
 give me, the smiles you put on my
 face, the laughs I get from talking
 to you, and just the fact that you
 can make me think of you even if
 we aren't talking at that moment.
 I honestly cannot say there's an
 answer to that, but I will say that
 you are the reason I am happy
 each and every day
Miscommunication is the greatest distance between two people, between two cultures between a person and their culture, a people and their lands. So many of us have been scattered, so many of us are living out our lives where we don't belong. I'm talking about the Africans in diaspora, those who know that they are African but have never been back. Those who have a sense of belonging to a place that they have never been, may never get to. You know deep down that you don't belong in Europe, or the Americas, you might say that we moved there from Africa hundreds of years ago through trade and settled there peacefully. You might say that you were taken there by force, either way if you are African, African is your home. I know you are scared, many of us speak a colonised tongue, don't know our own cultures and if your ancestors were enslaved, as mine were, you might not know where in Africa you are from. But please if you can travel there, got to a place that you have never been but you are from. Sit down with your people there and eat food, learn the languages, learn the cultures, take your children there so they aren't scared of home. Make children there who will grow up in their culture amongst their people. Different cultures and languages should be celebrated not feared. It's okay that when the different birds all go down to the watering hole to drink, they all leave with the same birds that they came with. It's not division just the balance in which we were created. Africa is for Africans, I believe that. The only people who will say it is not, are people who aren't African and want a piece of Africa for themselves. All peoples should travel and drink together, but leave when you are finished unless you have been welcomed. Unless you are going to be useful to the people and the cultures of the lands. If you are African and reading this it's time to go and visit your home for the first time. Don't have fear in your heart, you should never fear home, the only people who have created a fear of your home are those who aren't supposed to be there... chakabars

Miscommunication is the greatest distance between two people, between two cultures between a person and their culture, a people and their...

diaspora: The woman you're becoming will cost you people, relationships, spaces and material things. Choose her over everything. In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars
diaspora: The woman you're becoming will cost
 you people, relationships, spaces and
 material things. Choose her over
 everything.
In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars

In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that th...

diaspora: Diaspora Blues "So, here you are too foreign for home too foreign for here. never enough for both." ljeoma Umebinyuo It's important that I write to you, to teach you what I'm learning... As an African raised in europe, Africa was always "that other place", where I belong but I'm not from. I don't speak an African language I don't have any living relatives in Africa I didn't know any African cultures and the Europeans that stole me from there, have tried to keep me disconnected ever since. I must congratulate them, they have done really well. Even to the point where you have Africans in the UK calling themselves British. Africans in the Americas calling themselves American, and and so forth... Many of us Dislocated Africans see ourselves as other, we know we don't belong in European governed countries & we think that we don't belong in African countries. Europeans still profit heavily from this disconnect, they created laws to make stealing from Africa legal and to make us think that Africa is a scary far away place, where they eat children and have sex with animals. In Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 during a particularly harsh winter, the English that went there, murdered dismembered and ate a 14 year old child. In Finland, Romania and Hungary it is still legal to have sex with animals. Not saying Africa is perfect but don't just believe the media Hype. Africans globally, if you have a passport, go and visit your mother Africa, start to invest, start identifying yourselves as African. There is a difference between identity and nationality. Start investing, start moving, build with your brothers and sisters. Not everyone is going to welcome you with open arms, but you won't be murdered by the police because of the colour of your skin... chakabars
diaspora: Diaspora Blues
 "So, here you are
 too foreign for home
 too foreign for here.
 never enough for both."
 ljeoma Umebinyuo
It's important that I write to you, to teach you what I'm learning... As an African raised in europe, Africa was always "that other place", where I belong but I'm not from. I don't speak an African language I don't have any living relatives in Africa I didn't know any African cultures and the Europeans that stole me from there, have tried to keep me disconnected ever since. I must congratulate them, they have done really well. Even to the point where you have Africans in the UK calling themselves British. Africans in the Americas calling themselves American, and and so forth... Many of us Dislocated Africans see ourselves as other, we know we don't belong in European governed countries & we think that we don't belong in African countries. Europeans still profit heavily from this disconnect, they created laws to make stealing from Africa legal and to make us think that Africa is a scary far away place, where they eat children and have sex with animals. In Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 during a particularly harsh winter, the English that went there, murdered dismembered and ate a 14 year old child. In Finland, Romania and Hungary it is still legal to have sex with animals. Not saying Africa is perfect but don't just believe the media Hype. Africans globally, if you have a passport, go and visit your mother Africa, start to invest, start identifying yourselves as African. There is a difference between identity and nationality. Start investing, start moving, build with your brothers and sisters. Not everyone is going to welcome you with open arms, but you won't be murdered by the police because of the colour of your skin... chakabars

It's important that I write to you, to teach you what I'm learning... As an African raised in europe, Africa was always "that other place...

diaspora: esa Training with the Squad, tell @kendalljenner I said thank you for solving the Systemic & institutional racism & the police brutality that Africans in diaspora face daily with sugar.
diaspora: esa
Training with the Squad, tell @kendalljenner I said thank you for solving the Systemic & institutional racism & the police brutality that Africans in diaspora face daily with sugar.

Training with the Squad, tell @kendalljenner I said thank you for solving the Systemic & institutional racism & the police brutality that...

diaspora: Because you need the cutest girl you have seen wearing orange, on your timeline D Qchakabars In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars
diaspora: Because you need the cutest girl you have
 seen wearing orange, on your timeline D
 Qchakabars
In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars

In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that th...

diaspora: The only thing that separates many of us isalanguage and a boat ride... Ochakabars It's important that we show solidarity with Africans everywhere. ❤🖤💚 Wherever we are we face similar problems under oppressive, non African governance. Not that there aren't problems with African governments, but I'm not talking about that right now. Africans didn't steal us and scatter us across the globe. Africans didn't disproportionately imprison us, rape our cultures, force languages and religions upon us, tell us that we are ugly, not good enough for them, at the same time as impersonating our music, stealing our resources and forcing us to work for free. So if you are African in Brazil or Australia, the Caribbean, India, China, North, Central or South America then you are my family. You could be in Europe, or in Thailand. You could live in west Papua and you are my sister, you are my brother, your children are my children. I have been given privileges, but I don't believe that just because I was born in a particular land, or had a different up bringing I am any less African. Just because you came out of a vagina on a next land doesn't mean I don't care about you. An African elephant born in a zoo in Colombia is still an African elephant. Let us not pretend that Africa (A massive continent, with thousands of languages-dialects and cultures is some homogeneous land where everyone gets along. But let us remember that it is us everywhere and we all have to face adversity just for existing. This is how we help one another, by remembering that we need each other to grow. We need to grow and advance humanity because if you have been given a phone, then you have more power than many of the people around the world who look just like you. We need to trust each other, we need to love each other, we need to put our money together, we need to grow together so that we can rise as a people. The time is now, don't be that person who could have done something to change the situations of your people, but just watched or decided it wasn't your problem. Start local then act global. If you are a dislocated African in the diaspora, then learn your history and visit African countries. Take your money & your mind there, invest there, sort out the infrastructure,
diaspora: The only thing that separates many of us
 isalanguage and a boat ride...
 Ochakabars
It's important that we show solidarity with Africans everywhere. ❤🖤💚 Wherever we are we face similar problems under oppressive, non African governance. Not that there aren't problems with African governments, but I'm not talking about that right now. Africans didn't steal us and scatter us across the globe. Africans didn't disproportionately imprison us, rape our cultures, force languages and religions upon us, tell us that we are ugly, not good enough for them, at the same time as impersonating our music, stealing our resources and forcing us to work for free. So if you are African in Brazil or Australia, the Caribbean, India, China, North, Central or South America then you are my family. You could be in Europe, or in Thailand. You could live in west Papua and you are my sister, you are my brother, your children are my children. I have been given privileges, but I don't believe that just because I was born in a particular land, or had a different up bringing I am any less African. Just because you came out of a vagina on a next land doesn't mean I don't care about you. An African elephant born in a zoo in Colombia is still an African elephant. Let us not pretend that Africa (A massive continent, with thousands of languages-dialects and cultures is some homogeneous land where everyone gets along. But let us remember that it is us everywhere and we all have to face adversity just for existing. This is how we help one another, by remembering that we need each other to grow. We need to grow and advance humanity because if you have been given a phone, then you have more power than many of the people around the world who look just like you. We need to trust each other, we need to love each other, we need to put our money together, we need to grow together so that we can rise as a people. The time is now, don't be that person who could have done something to change the situations of your people, but just watched or decided it wasn't your problem. Start local then act global. If you are a dislocated African in the diaspora, then learn your history and visit African countries. Take your money & your mind there, invest there, sort out the infrastructure,

It's important that we show solidarity with Africans everywhere. ❤🖤💚 Wherever we are we face similar problems under oppressive, non Afric...

diaspora: BLACK GIRLS ARE THE DEFINITION oF NATIONAL GREATNESS BLACKTIVIST In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars
diaspora: BLACK GIRLS ARE THE DEFINITION
 oF NATIONAL GREATNESS
 BLACKTIVIST
In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars

In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that th...

diaspora: A man that refuses to learn from a woman is a fool A woman who has nothing to teach him, even more so. In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars
diaspora: A man that refuses to learn from a
 woman is a fool A woman who has
 nothing to teach him, even more so.
In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that the greatest women of the African diaspora were singers, or actors, sports stars or sex symbols. They never told me about the African queen Nefertiti who ruled alongside Akhenaten during the eighteenth dynasty. Nefertiti means, “The beautiful one has arrived.” They never told me that societies or civilisations where matriarchy was the dominant system, have had more peace than patriarchy. Or about Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" who fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism. Or the Nupe women warriors called Isadshi-Koseshi who fought as fiercely as the men, opposing invasions of the Fulbe conquerers who raided the Nupe for cattles and slaves, especially women. Betty Shabazz, educator and civil rights advocate. Coretta Scott King was an American author, activist, and civil rights leader. Nanny of the Maroons, the obeah-woman from Ghana who went to Jamaica to be a high priestess and leader of her people, (never having been a slave). Nanny led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. Bell hooks, author, feminist and social activist. Or Angela Davis Black panther leader. Rosa parks the human rights activist. Brave Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, politician and South African rights activist, who fought against the evil Dutch police, when they thought it was okay to shoot Africans in the face, just because they were Black. These colonisers calling themselves Africans! Harriet Tubman freed slaves via the underground rail roads, Mary Seacole had her legacy copied by Florence nightingale. Assata shakur is still the only women on the FBIs most wanted list because she represents black power. I could go on all day as there are so many great role model women, why anybody is bothered about porn star types I'll never know. Please understand African women I love you and I value you. You are the most oppressed beings on the planet, yet you remain beautiful and I thank you. chakabars

In school the only thing I got taught about African women, is that they were enslaved and took to the Americas. I always got told that th...

diaspora: When the movie over but you sneekin to the next-one e Diaspora You gotta be slick when doing this shit. I remember it was me, @aka.quan & Gerald all chilling at His grandma crib. I wasn't trying to stay at her crib tho cause it smelled like Vix and oatmeal. We decided to go the movies but what's the point of going if we not smacked. Daquan always coming in clutch and brought some purp for us to blow. Me and Daquan gone after a few pulls when I see Gerald choking like puff daddy after the first puff. Nigga had baby lungs. That's strike 1. We Baked and decided to go the movies. We get to the theater and this nigga Gerald left his wallet on the bus. At this point I'm ready to choke slam this nigga through the counter on some undertaker shit. That was strike 2. I pay for his ticket & we go see Robo Cop. We not even 10 minutes in when Quan brought up a interesting point. We don't fvck with the Cops.. so we hit the dip to see another movie. @Aka.quan sneaks out first then Gerald but he tripped, and my cup of Grape soda spilled. Smh such a waste of the precious grape drink. We left the movie looking for another one when I see DAQUAN talking to some jada Fire looking bitch. niggas always tryna get Pvssy at the wrong time. We bout to sneak to the next movie when some Terry Cruz looking security guard starts rushing us. Homeboy went from daquan to sonic real quick. Me and Gerald booked it too when all of a sudden this Nigga dolphin dived on some Black ops shit that was strike 3.. Smh niqqa thought this was zombies.. he so childish. Me and Daquan bounced. the SavageBrothers haven't been to that theater since.
diaspora: When the movie over but
 you sneekin to the next-one
 e Diaspora
You gotta be slick when doing this shit. I remember it was me, @aka.quan & Gerald all chilling at His grandma crib. I wasn't trying to stay at her crib tho cause it smelled like Vix and oatmeal. We decided to go the movies but what's the point of going if we not smacked. Daquan always coming in clutch and brought some purp for us to blow. Me and Daquan gone after a few pulls when I see Gerald choking like puff daddy after the first puff. Nigga had baby lungs. That's strike 1. We Baked and decided to go the movies. We get to the theater and this nigga Gerald left his wallet on the bus. At this point I'm ready to choke slam this nigga through the counter on some undertaker shit. That was strike 2. I pay for his ticket & we go see Robo Cop. We not even 10 minutes in when Quan brought up a interesting point. We don't fvck with the Cops.. so we hit the dip to see another movie. @Aka.quan sneaks out first then Gerald but he tripped, and my cup of Grape soda spilled. Smh such a waste of the precious grape drink. We left the movie looking for another one when I see DAQUAN talking to some jada Fire looking bitch. niggas always tryna get Pvssy at the wrong time. We bout to sneak to the next movie when some Terry Cruz looking security guard starts rushing us. Homeboy went from daquan to sonic real quick. Me and Gerald booked it too when all of a sudden this Nigga dolphin dived on some Black ops shit that was strike 3.. Smh niqqa thought this was zombies.. he so childish. Me and Daquan bounced. the SavageBrothers haven't been to that theater since.

You gotta be slick when doing this shit. I remember it was me, @aka.quan & Gerald all chilling at His grandma crib. I wasn't trying to st...

diaspora: dynamicafrica: A Brief History of Cumbia and its African Roots. Like many dance and music styles that have emerged and have been popularized throughout Latin America, and in Latin American diaspora communities, Cumbia has its backbone and roots in the culture, traditions and practices of the enslaved Africans brought to this region of the world. Although there are many forms of cumbia ranging from cumbia Peruana and cumbia Argentina, to cumbia Chilena and cumbia Mexicana (named after the respective countries they emerged from), the heart and origins of traditional cumbian music and culture lie mostly in Colombia’s Afro-Colombian community. Many musicians, dancers, and historians say that cumbia’s percussion represents the African influence, its melodies and use of the gaita or caña de millo (cane flute) represents the Native Colombian influence, and the dress represents the Spanish influence. Birthed from a cultural style of music known as Folclor Colombiano (Colombian folklore music played by Afro-Colombian musicians), Cumbia has developed to become an amalgamation of musical and cultural blends that reflect the mixed cultural heritage of Colombia. The very word ‘cumbia’ is said to have come from the word “cumbé” which was (and continues to be) a dance form Guinea. In 17th century Colombia, enslaved Africans (mostly from West Africa) would carry out a type of courtship dance that, altered by various influences throughout the years, began being referred to as ‘cumbia’ in the 1800s. Where it began using mostly West African percussion and vocal styles, Amerindian and Spanish instruments, clothing and other cultural traits, as it progressed began to become a more widepsread practice, new adapations of the original form of cumbia were birthed. Cumbia has since become reinvented in both style and sound, leading it become the backbone for various other Latin American music styles.  (continue reading at Global Conversation, Discover Colombia, Grupo Fantasia) Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud viva Colombia! 
diaspora: dynamicafrica:

A Brief History of Cumbia and its African Roots.
Like many dance and music styles that have emerged and have been popularized throughout Latin America, and in Latin American diaspora communities, Cumbia has its backbone and roots in the culture, traditions and practices of the enslaved Africans brought to this region of the world.
Although there are many forms of cumbia ranging from cumbia Peruana and cumbia Argentina, to cumbia Chilena and cumbia Mexicana (named after the respective countries they emerged from), the heart and origins of traditional cumbian music and culture lie mostly in Colombia’s Afro-Colombian community. Many musicians, dancers, and historians say that cumbia’s percussion represents the African influence, its melodies and use of the gaita or caña de millo (cane flute) represents the Native Colombian influence, and the dress represents the Spanish influence. 
Birthed from a cultural style of music known as Folclor Colombiano (Colombian folklore music played by Afro-Colombian musicians), Cumbia has developed to become an amalgamation of musical and cultural blends that reflect the mixed cultural heritage of Colombia. The very word ‘cumbia’ is said to have come from the word “cumbé” which was (and continues to be) a dance form Guinea. In 17th century Colombia, enslaved Africans (mostly from West Africa) would carry out a type of courtship dance that, altered by various influences throughout the years, began being referred to as ‘cumbia’ in the 1800s.
Where it began using mostly West African percussion and vocal styles, Amerindian and Spanish instruments, clothing and other cultural traits, as it progressed began to become a more widepsread practice, new adapations of the original form of cumbia were birthed. Cumbia has since become reinvented in both style and sound, leading it become the backbone for various other Latin American music styles. 
(continue reading at Global Conversation, Discover Colombia, Grupo Fantasia)
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud


viva Colombia! 

dynamicafrica: A Brief History of Cumbia and its African Roots. Like many dance and music styles that have emerged and have been popular...