Omg Why
Omg Why

Omg Why

For Now
For Now

For Now

no consequences
 no consequences

no consequences

mess up
 mess up

mess up

mistake
 mistake

mistake

sponges
 sponges

sponges

stay up
 stay up

stay up

deliver
 deliver

deliver

drawers
 drawers

drawers

homed
homed

homed

🔥 | Latest

Consequences: what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.
Consequences: what-even-is-thiss:

bobcatdump:

jaskiegg:

mellomaia:

aphony-cree:

beyoncescock:

gahdamnpunk:

Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making


THANK YOU

I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.”
The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner
If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents 
People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings

Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents.
When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. 
I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.



God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent

“I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this



The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. 
A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.”
I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future.
Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that.
My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad.
To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time.
It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.

what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychologica...

Consequences: what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making THANK YOU I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.” The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents. When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious. God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent “I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.” I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future. Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that. My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad. To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time. It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.
Consequences: what-even-is-thiss:

bobcatdump:

jaskiegg:

mellomaia:

aphony-cree:

beyoncescock:

gahdamnpunk:

Honestly!!! This is just psychological trauma in the making


THANK YOU

I’ve asked parents about this and they always say they are teaching the child responsibility and “respect for other people’s things.” If I point out that the child accidentally broke their own toy they always say “I bought them that toy” or “my sister gave that to them.”
The problem is that parents view all possessions as not really belonging to the child. A part of them always seems to think that the adult who provided the money is the real owner
If a parent breaks a dish they see it as breaking something that already belonged to them, but if a child breaks it they see it as the child breaking something that belonged to the parents 
People raising children need to realize that household possessions belong to the entire household. If everyone has to use that plate then it belongs to everyone and anyone can have a forgivable accident with it. It’s okay to deem certain possessions as just yours and ask everyone in the house to respect that, but extend the same respect to your child’s belongings

Big mood. I know most of these are talking about little little kids, but here’s a tale from middle school. I had forgotten to charge my phone one night, and this was back when cell phones used to beep loudly when they were low on battery. I kept hearing the noise throughout the afternoon and not recognizing what it was because I’d never heard it before. When I finally did realize what it was, I was in science class and my fellow classmates were making presentations. I reached into my bag to try to turn off the phone, and then the low-battery sound went off, loud enough for the teacher to hear it. She confiscated my phone in front of everyone, and I didn’t get it back until after the weekend because it was a Friday. I was really embarrassed, especially to tell my parents.
When I got my phone back that Monday, my teacher said it was important for me to learn this lesson now since in college they wouldn’t tolerate phones going off. Fast forward to when I was in college, any time someone’s phone went off, either the professor would tell them to turn it off, or they would say, “Oh, my bad,” and turn it off themselves, and everyone would move on. I even had a professor who danced around while someone’s phone went off, and it was a welcome moment of levity during the lecture. 
I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.



God I’ve been reading these posts for a while and each time I am struck with the realization that certainly not all parents were supposed to be a parent

“I say all this to say, one of the worst aspects of being a child/teen was adults assuming my intentions were malicious.”YES this



The problem is, even if families are forgiving the culture around children still effects the child. I use myself as proof of that. 
A few times between the ages of 4 and 18 I broke things. I broke my grandma’s favorite Christmas ornament. Her first question was: “Are you hurt?” and when I apologized profusely she said “I’m just glad you weren’t hurt.”
I broke a few plates. I broke a couple glasses. Every time my dad’s first response was “Did you get cut?” the second step was cleaning up the broken bits, and the third was a discussion of what led to me breaking it and how I could avoid doing that in the future.
Same with spills. Same with stains. My biggest “punishment” from my immediate family was being taught how to clean up the mess I made and being shown in detail how to avoid the same mistake in the future if it was avoidable. There were consequences for my actions, but they were the direct result of those actions and nothing much beyond that.
My family tried so hard to teach me how to deal with accidents in a healthy way. They were patient. They treated every slip-up as a learning opportunity. They showed me a lot of love. The other adults still got to me. Teachers still punished and publicly shamed me and other students for our mess-ups. Extended family members outside of my small supportive circle still yelled at me. My friends’ parents still got mad.
To the point where whenever I messed up my first instinct was that my dad or grandparents were going to punish me, or yell at me, or hit me, even though they never did. They just didn’t. They always responded with patience and an attitude of “I’m glad you’re safe and I want to help you learn from this.” And I was still afraid of messing up. Mortified. Expecting the worst every time.
It’s like… we need to change the culture around this, man. Completely.

what-even-is-thiss: bobcatdump: jaskiegg: mellomaia: aphony-cree: beyoncescock: gahdamnpunk: Honestly!!! This is just psychologica...

Consequences: They’ve caused some rather unintended consequences this year
Consequences: They’ve caused some rather unintended consequences this year

They’ve caused some rather unintended consequences this year

Consequences: Do the right thing or face the consequences (via /r/BlackPeopleTwitter)
Consequences: Do the right thing or face the consequences (via /r/BlackPeopleTwitter)

Do the right thing or face the consequences (via /r/BlackPeopleTwitter)

Consequences: Do the right thing or face the consequences by Kelmo7 MORE MEMES
Consequences: Do the right thing or face the consequences by Kelmo7
MORE MEMES

Do the right thing or face the consequences by Kelmo7 MORE MEMES

Consequences: Do the right thing or face the consequences
Consequences: Do the right thing or face the consequences

Do the right thing or face the consequences

Consequences: quecksilvereyes: blackqueerblog: Some parents really don’t understand the difference between actual discipline and hurting your kids. This teaches a kid nothing except needing to hide what makes them happy because they’re scared their parents will destroy it. also????? wake up your kid if they don’t hear their alarm????? dont do this???? I get the point on needing to be able to wake up by himself, but 1 - alarms don’t promote that either and 2 - he’s 9.If he’s sleeping in, especially at a younger age? There’s something wrong. Kids tend to wale up early, have high energy, etc. He’s either unable to sleep at night due to the monotony of the day not taking up enough energy, or being in lockdown has been affecting his mental health, which will make him more tired, or maybe he’s feeling ill and sees no reason to mention it because it won’t affect anything, or who knows what else. Don’t punish your kid for sleeping late, make sure they’re okay and maybe, if they feel they need more sleep, add an extra hour on in the morning or something. Saying that if he doesn’t wake up on time there will be consequences, which will stress him out and stop him sleeping, maybe even motivating him to stay up all night instead of risking oversleeping. We don’t have control over when we wake up, and if he’s sleeping through alarms, something needs to change. Maybe even changing the sound will help, but you gotta try and find a solution to whatever is causing him to oversleep, not make him feel bad for it and, in the process, lose his trust.Also, just so you know, postive reinforcement (giving a reward) and negative reinforcement (temoving something bad - such as painkillers removing a headache) work miles better than punishment (destroying something they love and are proud of).
Consequences: quecksilvereyes:

blackqueerblog:
Some parents really don’t understand the difference between actual discipline and hurting your kids.

This teaches a kid nothing except needing to hide what makes them happy because they’re scared their parents will destroy it.




also????? wake up your kid if they don’t hear their alarm????? dont do this????


I get the point on needing to be able to wake up by himself, but 1 - alarms don’t promote that either and 2 - he’s 9.If he’s sleeping in, especially at a younger age? There’s something wrong. Kids tend to wale up early, have high energy, etc. He’s either unable to sleep at night due to the monotony of the day not taking up enough energy, or being in lockdown has been affecting his mental health, which will make him more tired, or maybe he’s feeling ill and sees no reason to mention it because it won’t affect anything, or who knows what else. Don’t punish your kid for sleeping late, make sure they’re okay and maybe, if they feel they need more sleep, add an extra hour on in the morning or something. Saying that if he doesn’t wake up on time there will be consequences, which will stress him out and stop him sleeping, maybe even motivating him to stay up all night instead of risking oversleeping. We don’t have control over when we wake up, and if he’s sleeping through alarms, something needs to change. Maybe even changing the sound will help, but you gotta try and find a solution to whatever is causing him to oversleep, not make him feel bad for it and, in the process, lose his trust.Also, just so you know, postive reinforcement (giving a reward) and negative reinforcement (temoving something bad - such as painkillers removing a headache) work miles better than punishment (destroying something they love and are proud of).

quecksilvereyes: blackqueerblog: Some parents really don’t understand the difference between actual discipline and hurting your kids. T...

Consequences: There are always consequences to the truth
Consequences: There are always consequences to the truth

There are always consequences to the truth

Consequences: We see places doing this, we’re seeing the consequences, we saw the exact same thing happen a century ago, and yet we can’t seem to learn.
Consequences: We see places doing this, we’re seeing the consequences, we saw the exact same thing happen a century ago, and yet we can’t seem to learn.

We see places doing this, we’re seeing the consequences, we saw the exact same thing happen a century ago, and yet we can’t seem to learn.

Consequences: Maybe if she didn't abuse her cats on stream, be an overall asshole, and have no consequences until now we wouldn't have a problem with her.
Consequences: Maybe if she didn't abuse her cats on stream, be an overall asshole, and have no consequences until now we wouldn't have a problem with her.

Maybe if she didn't abuse her cats on stream, be an overall asshole, and have no consequences until now we wouldn't have a problem with her.

Consequences: I guess actions really do have consequences
Consequences: I guess actions really do have consequences

I guess actions really do have consequences

Consequences: Consequences never mentions dragons.
Consequences: Consequences never mentions dragons.

Consequences never mentions dragons.

Consequences: I read consequences after seeing a meme of it and too slapped my knee.
Consequences: I read consequences after seeing a meme of it and too slapped my knee.

I read consequences after seeing a meme of it and too slapped my knee.

Consequences: Your actions will have consequences
Consequences: Your actions will have consequences

Your actions will have consequences

Consequences: Killer is so much fun.. but i’m too mentally weak to take the consequences, might even stop.
Consequences: Killer is so much fun.. but i’m too mentally weak to take the consequences, might even stop.

Killer is so much fun.. but i’m too mentally weak to take the consequences, might even stop.

Consequences: Doesn’t it suck how this follows you into adulthood except with real consequences?
Consequences: Doesn’t it suck how this follows you into adulthood except with real consequences?

Doesn’t it suck how this follows you into adulthood except with real consequences?

Consequences: The Consequences for Improperly Disposing of Your Dead Iguana
Consequences: The Consequences for Improperly Disposing of Your Dead Iguana

The Consequences for Improperly Disposing of Your Dead Iguana

Consequences: how was i supposed to know that there'd be consequences for my actions??
Consequences: how was i supposed to know that there'd be consequences for my actions??

how was i supposed to know that there'd be consequences for my actions??

Consequences: Who would've guessed actions have consequences?
Consequences: Who would've guessed actions have consequences?

Who would've guessed actions have consequences?

Consequences: Your actions will have consequences
Consequences: Your actions will have consequences

Your actions will have consequences

Consequences: In FF7R, after chapter 12 the 3D midgar map will accurately represent the consequences of the past event.
Consequences: In FF7R, after chapter 12 the 3D midgar map will accurately represent the consequences of the past event.

In FF7R, after chapter 12 the 3D midgar map will accurately represent the consequences of the past event.

Consequences: Wordy but im pissed that theres basically no consequences for reposting
Consequences: Wordy but im pissed that theres basically no consequences for reposting

Wordy but im pissed that theres basically no consequences for reposting

Consequences: Panic Buyers are dealing with the consequences
Consequences: Panic Buyers are dealing with the consequences

Panic Buyers are dealing with the consequences

Consequences: Eliminating sex indeed has....dire consequences for the Milky Way.
Consequences: Eliminating sex indeed has....dire consequences for the Milky Way.

Eliminating sex indeed has....dire consequences for the Milky Way.

Consequences: My last post suffered the consequences
Consequences: My last post suffered the consequences

My last post suffered the consequences

Consequences: Unintended consequences...
Consequences: Unintended consequences...

Unintended consequences...

Consequences: I knew the consequences but am still surprised by the outcome.
Consequences: I knew the consequences but am still surprised by the outcome.

I knew the consequences but am still surprised by the outcome.

Consequences: When will you learn that your actions have consequences.
Consequences: When will you learn that your actions have consequences.

When will you learn that your actions have consequences.

Consequences: Unfortunate Confidence with Consequences
Consequences: Unfortunate Confidence with Consequences

Unfortunate Confidence with Consequences

Consequences: Thanks, I hate the inevitable consequences of bad food choices
Consequences: Thanks, I hate the inevitable consequences of bad food choices

Thanks, I hate the inevitable consequences of bad food choices

Consequences: When will you learn THAT YOUR ACTIONS HAVE CONSEQUENCES!!!
Consequences: When will you learn THAT YOUR ACTIONS HAVE CONSEQUENCES!!!

When will you learn THAT YOUR ACTIONS HAVE CONSEQUENCES!!!

Consequences: Not paying bills should have no consequences...
Consequences: Not paying bills should have no consequences...

Not paying bills should have no consequences...

Consequences: I got a knockoff piece, mine didn't come with no consequences
Consequences: I got a knockoff piece, mine didn't come with no consequences

I got a knockoff piece, mine didn't come with no consequences

Consequences: If you ever feel like you aren't doing too hot at a game... well here is the last summary from my Dishonored 2 "live with the consequences run" mission.
Consequences: If you ever feel like you aren't doing too hot at a game... well here is the last summary from my Dishonored 2 "live with the consequences run" mission.

If you ever feel like you aren't doing too hot at a game... well here is the last summary from my Dishonored 2 "live with the consequence...

Consequences: Mess with danny devito and you better be prepared for the consequences.
Consequences: Mess with danny devito and you better be prepared for the consequences.

Mess with danny devito and you better be prepared for the consequences.

Consequences: SLPT .Make bold choices without fear of consequences
Consequences: SLPT .Make bold choices without fear of consequences

SLPT .Make bold choices without fear of consequences

Consequences: “ if you don’t do the things we supposed to do the consequences could be-“
Consequences: “ if you don’t do the things we supposed to do the consequences could be-“

“ if you don’t do the things we supposed to do the consequences could be-“

Consequences: Your actions have consequences
Consequences: Your actions have consequences

Your actions have consequences

Consequences: PRAISE THE LORD OF BALL OR SUFFER THE CONSEQUENCES
Consequences: PRAISE THE LORD OF BALL OR SUFFER THE CONSEQUENCES

PRAISE THE LORD OF BALL OR SUFFER THE CONSEQUENCES

Consequences: The pewdiepie invasion and it’s consequences have been a disaster for the Reddit race
Consequences: The pewdiepie invasion and it’s consequences have been a disaster for the Reddit race

The pewdiepie invasion and it’s consequences have been a disaster for the Reddit race

Consequences: Unforeseen Consequences
Consequences: Unforeseen Consequences

Unforeseen Consequences

Consequences: Tiger Kings biggest problem is white people can do anything without consequences!
Consequences: Tiger Kings biggest problem is white people can do anything without consequences!

Tiger Kings biggest problem is white people can do anything without consequences!

Consequences: When undocumented code has major consequences
Consequences: When undocumented code has major consequences

When undocumented code has major consequences