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🔥 | Latest

80s, Apparently, and Books: ladylisa: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: stripedsilverfeline: anti-clerical: ramirezbundydahmer: When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969. This should be required learning, internationally.  You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten.  Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now.  Make it stop?  I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling. My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable.  I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them. @mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account. It is a thin little book. When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin. Why there wasn’t other books like it. Other first hand accounts. By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore. Further reading: I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended) This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany. Apparently, this wasnt taught in schools in the 70s-80s, cuz when I mentioned it to my mom, she had no idea that gays were held in concentration camps. She thought it was just jewish people.
80s, Apparently, and Books: ladylisa:
gemfyre:

lauralandons:

thereadersmuse:

jehovahhthickness:

lightning-st0rm:

pearlmito:

smootymormonhelldream:

stripedsilverfeline:

anti-clerical:

ramirezbundydahmer:

When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969.

This should be required learning, internationally. 

You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten. 
Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now. 
Make it stop? 

I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling.

My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable. 

I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them.

@mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf

Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account.
It is a thin little book.
When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin.
Why there wasn’t other books like it.
Other first hand accounts.
By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore.

Further reading:
I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel
An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck
The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant
Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington
Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended)

This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany.


Apparently, this wasnt taught in schools in the 70s-80s, cuz when I mentioned it to my mom, she had no idea that gays were held in concentration camps. She thought it was just jewish people.

ladylisa: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: stripedsilverf...

Books, Crime, and Ironic: nonbinarysapphic: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: stripedsilverfeline: anti-clerical: ramirezbundydahmer: When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969. This should be required learning, internationally.  You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten.  Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now.  Make it stop?  I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling. My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable.  I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them. @mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account. It is a thin little book. When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin. Why there wasn’t other books like it. Other first hand accounts. By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore. Further reading: I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended) This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany. can i just say i was literately in a genocide and holocaust class and i didnt even learn this
Books, Crime, and Ironic: nonbinarysapphic:

gemfyre:

lauralandons:

thereadersmuse:

jehovahhthickness:

lightning-st0rm:

pearlmito:

smootymormonhelldream:

stripedsilverfeline:

anti-clerical:

ramirezbundydahmer:

When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969.

This should be required learning, internationally. 

You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten. 
Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now. 
Make it stop? 

I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling.

My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable. 

I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them.

@mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf

Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account.
It is a thin little book.
When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin.
Why there wasn’t other books like it.
Other first hand accounts.
By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore.

Further reading:
I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel
An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck
The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant
Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington
Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended)

This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later - if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why - because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany.


can i just say i was literately in a genocide and holocaust class and i didnt even learn this

nonbinarysapphic: gemfyre: lauralandons: thereadersmuse: jehovahhthickness: lightning-st0rm: pearlmito: smootymormonhelldream: strip...

Black History Month, Children, and Life: <p>Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor</p> <p>Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. </p> <p>While Georgia had harsh laws against the education of slaves, Susie attended two secret schools taught by black women as a young girl and learned the rudiments of literacy. Later she was educated by two white youths who knowingly broke the law. In April 1862 She and many other African Americans fled to St. Simons Island, occupied at the time by Union forces. While there, her education became known and she was asked to teach at a freedman&rsquo;s school, teaching freed slave children how to read. At night, many adults would also come to her, eager to learn. She eventually married a black Union soldier and served in the army as a nurse, as well as educating the soldiers. </p> <p>For more information, visit this website: <a href="http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912">http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912</a></p>
Black History Month, Children, and Life: <p>Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor</p>

<p>Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. </p>

<p>While Georgia had harsh laws against the education of slaves, Susie attended two secret schools taught by black women as a young girl and learned the rudiments of literacy. Later she was educated by two white youths who knowingly broke the law. In April 1862 She and many other African Americans fled to St. Simons Island, occupied at the time by Union forces. While there, her education became known and she was asked to teach at a freedman&rsquo;s school, teaching freed slave children how to read. At night, many adults would also come to her, eager to learn. She eventually married a black Union soldier and served in the army as a nurse, as well as educating the soldiers. </p>

<p>For more information, visit this website: <a href="http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912">http://m.georgiaencyclopedia.org/articles/history-archaeology/susie-king-taylor-1848-1912</a></p>

Black history month day 4: Susie King Taylor Susie Baker King Taylor was an Army nurse in the Civil War, and the first African American to ...

Anaconda, Bad, and Christmas: 2016 READING CHALLENGE A book with more than 500 pagesA book you can finish in a day A classic romance A book that became a movie A book published this year A book with a number in the title A book written by someone under 30 A book with nonhuman characters A funny book A book by a female author A mystery or thriller A book with a one-word title A book of short stories A book set in a different country A nonfiction book A popular author's first book A book from an author you love A book with antonyms in the title A book set somewhere you've always wanted to visit aA book that came out the year you were bonn A book with bad reviews A trilogy A book from your childhood A book with a love triangle A book set in the future A book set in high school A book with a color in the title A book that made you cry A book with magic A graphic novel A book by an author you've never that you haven't read yet A book a friend recommended A Pulitzer Prize-winning book A book based on a true story A book at the bottom of your read before A book you own but have never read A book that takes place in your hometown A book that was originally written in a different language A book set during Christmas A book written by an author with your to-read list A book your mom loves A book that scares you A book more than 100 years old A book based entirely on its cover A book you were supposed to read in same initials A play A banned book A book based on or turned into a TV show A book you started but never finished school but didn't A memoir <p>True Challenge.</p>
Anaconda, Bad, and Christmas: 2016
 READING
 CHALLENGE
 A book with more than 500 pagesA book you can finish in a day
 A classic romance
 A book that became a movie
 A book published this year
 A book with a number in the title
 A book written by someone under 30
 A book with nonhuman characters
 A funny book
 A book by a female author
 A mystery or thriller
 A book with a one-word title
 A book of short stories
 A book set in a different country
 A nonfiction book
 A popular author's first book
 A book from an author you love
 A book with antonyms in the title
 A book set somewhere you've always
 wanted to visit
 aA book that came out the year you
 were bonn
 A book with bad reviews
 A trilogy
 A book from your childhood
 A book with a love triangle
 A book set in the future
 A book set in high school
 A book with a color in the title
 A book that made you cry
 A book with magic
 A graphic novel
 A book by an author you've never
 that you haven't read yet
 A book a friend recommended
 A Pulitzer Prize-winning book
 A book based on a true story
 A book at the bottom of your
 read before
 A book you own but have never read
 A book that takes place in your hometown
 A book that was originally written in a
 different language
 A book set during Christmas
 A book written by an author with your
 to-read list
 A book your mom loves
 A book that scares you
 A book more than 100 years old
 A book based entirely on its cover
 A book you were supposed to read in
 same initials
 A play
 A banned book
 A book based on or turned into a TV show
 A book you started but never finished
 school but didn't
 A memoir
<p>True Challenge.</p>

True Challenge.

Africa, Amazon, and Arguing: The tive Most Common fiction Oriting mistakes amandaonwriting: The Five Most Common Fiction Writing Mistakes I have run my course, Writers Write, for 10 years. I have learned so much from teaching novelists to dream their books into life. After seeing more than 130 graduates published, I have identified these as being the most common mistakes made by debut writers.  Beginner writers all want to write their life story in the form of a novel. Almost every writer who comes through the school thinks they have a life story so compelling that an editor won’t be able to resist it. Starting a query letter with, ‘This novel is based on my life,’ means the dreaded slush pile! Even if your mother sold you to gypsies to feed her heroin habit, or your father let his father molest you, your story is not unique. I promise you they’ve heard it all. See a therapist. Then write a novel. Or write a memoir. But learn how to do it so that it is not an indulgence. Chris van Wyk’s Shirley, Goodness Mercy, Alexandra Fuller’s Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight and Peter Godwin’s Mukiwa are good examples of memoirs. Beginners have no antagonist. If you develop well-constructed protagonists and antagonists, who SPEAK and ARGUE and FIGHT, you will be able to write a book. How can you write a novel, which is generally 360 pages long, without a villain? Who will your hero fight to achieve his goal? The other characters – love interests and friends - are not important for the plot. They are important to show a protagonist’s life, goals, motivations, and feelings without you telling your reader what they are.  Beginner writers have no plot. Beginner writers either stop at about 20 000 words or carry on until they reach 120 000 or more! Most novels are 80 000 words. Either way, these writers don’t have a plot. Most first time authors ramble on philosophically until they have told the story. They are writing an essay, not a novel. This is called telling. Never tell. Beginners do not have enough dialogue. In modern fiction you have to show. The narrator style of writing has all but disappeared. One way to get around this problem is to use dialogue. Modern novels contain 60-70% dialogue. I suggest that writers make friends with this writing tool.  Beginner writers hang on to an idea for a novel that is no longer popular. All writers have a story from long ago, mostly high school, which they won’t let go. I ask these writers to go to their nearest good bookshop and look at the new releases. I tell them to do some research on Amazon. Would their book fit in either of these places? Family sagas written by authors like Barbara Taylor Bradford in the 1980s do not sell now. Nor do cosy mysteries a la Agatha Christie, or historical adventures like those written by Wilbur Smith – unless you are Wilbur Smith. These writers need to let go, do some research and write fiction that readers want to read, and that publishers will buy.  Why I believe in Writers Write  I have watched people struggle as they decide whether or not they need to attend a writing course. After many rejections and lots of reflection, they join.  Writing teachers and mentors, and writing courses, have been popular for longer than most people know.  Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) lectures creative writing, as do Wally Lamb (She’s Come Undone) and Janet Fitch (White Oleander). South African writers like Andre Brink and J.M. Coetzee have lectured creative writing. When I interviewed Marina Lewycka (A Short History of Tractors in the Ukranian) she revealed that a writing course was her secret to becoming published. Charlaine Harris was discovered on a writing course. Writing support groups have also helped many writers. Consider Gertrude Stein, who sacrificed much of her own career to mentor the likes of F Scott Fitzgerald, T S Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway.  Don’t ever be afraid to learn. The most successful novelists have always looked for help when they’ve needed it.  I hope this helps. If you want to enrol on Amanda’s course, Writers Write, email neo@writerswrite.co.za   by Amanda Patterson From Writers Write
Africa, Amazon, and Arguing: The tive Most Common fiction
 Oriting mistakes
amandaonwriting:

The Five Most Common Fiction Writing Mistakes
I have run my course, Writers Write, for 10 years. I have learned so much from teaching novelists to dream their books into life. After seeing more than 130 graduates published, I have identified these as being the most common mistakes made by debut writers. 
Beginner writers all want to write their life story in the form of a novel. Almost every writer who comes through the school thinks they have a life story so compelling that an editor won’t be able to resist it. Starting a query letter with, ‘This novel is based on my life,’ means the dreaded slush pile! Even if your mother sold you to gypsies to feed her heroin habit, or your father let his father molest you, your story is not unique. I promise you they’ve heard it all. See a therapist. Then write a novel. Or write a memoir. But learn how to do it so that it is not an indulgence. Chris van Wyk’s Shirley, Goodness  Mercy, Alexandra Fuller’s Don’t Let’s Go To The Dogs Tonight and Peter Godwin’s Mukiwa are good examples of memoirs.
Beginners have no antagonist. If you develop well-constructed protagonists and antagonists, who SPEAK and ARGUE and FIGHT, you will be able to write a book. How can you write a novel, which is generally 360 pages long, without a villain? Who will your hero fight to achieve his goal? The other characters – love interests and friends - are not important for the plot. They are important to show a protagonist’s life, goals, motivations, and feelings without you telling your reader what they are. 
Beginner writers have no plot. Beginner writers either stop at about 20 000 words or carry on until they reach 120 000 or more! Most novels are 80 000 words. Either way, these writers don’t have a plot. Most first time authors ramble on philosophically until they have told the story. They are writing an essay, not a novel. This is called telling. Never tell.
Beginners do not have enough dialogue. In modern fiction you have to show. The narrator style of writing has all but disappeared. One way to get around this problem is to use dialogue. Modern novels contain 60-70% dialogue. I suggest that writers make friends with this writing tool. 
Beginner writers hang on to an idea for a novel that is no longer popular. All writers have a story from long ago, mostly high school, which they won’t let go. I ask these writers to go to their nearest good bookshop and look at the new releases. I tell them to do some research on Amazon. Would their book fit in either of these places? Family sagas written by authors like Barbara Taylor Bradford in the 1980s do not sell now. Nor do cosy mysteries a la Agatha Christie, or historical adventures like those written by Wilbur Smith – unless you are Wilbur Smith. These writers need to let go, do some research and write fiction that readers want to read, and that publishers will buy. 
Why I believe in Writers Write 
I have watched people struggle as they decide whether or not they need to attend a writing course. After many rejections and lots of reflection, they join. 
Writing teachers and mentors, and writing courses, have been popular for longer than most people know. 
Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) lectures creative writing, as do Wally Lamb (She’s Come Undone) and Janet Fitch (White Oleander). South African writers like Andre Brink and J.M. Coetzee have lectured creative writing.
When I interviewed Marina Lewycka (A Short History of Tractors in the Ukranian) she revealed that a writing course was her secret to becoming published. Charlaine Harris was discovered on a writing course.
Writing support groups have also helped many writers. Consider Gertrude Stein, who sacrificed much of her own career to mentor the likes of F Scott Fitzgerald, T S Eliot, Ezra Pound, James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway. 
Don’t ever be afraid to learn. The most successful novelists have always looked for help when they’ve needed it. 
I hope this helps.
If you want to enrol on Amanda’s course, Writers Write, email neo@writerswrite.co.za 
 by Amanda Patterson
From Writers Write

amandaonwriting: The Five Most Common Fiction Writing Mistakes I have run my course, Writers Write, for 10 years. I have learned so much fr...